Andrew James premium bread now £59.99 identical to Lakelands bread maker plus 17892 Best Buy which
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Andrew James premium bread now £59.99 identical to Lakelands bread maker plus 17892 Best Buy which

29
Found 26th Jun 2016
The Andrew James Breadmaker comes with integrated scales and has £10 off with free delivery. This is an identical model to the Lakeland Breadmaker plus 17892 that Which? experts voted the Best Buy, however Lakeland charge £130 for theirs!
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That's expensive bread, premium or not! :-)
Original Poster
Dyslexic_Dog

That's expensive bread, premium or not! :-)



We would usually buy a fresh loaf everyday...£365 that's a premium!
This machine will pay for itself in two months.
you still need to buy the mix to make the bread.
It would be waste of money, space and health if you buy bread maker and buy ordinary bread mix or flour.
Everyone has different reasons why they bake their own bread, but i think main should be avoiding bleached fine milled four , which covers majority of the market in UK. They dont mention this in ingredient section because its considered to be an industry standard. Same story with bleached (very unhealthy) white sugar.
To bake healthy (or rather not poisinuos) loaf will cost you considerably more than to buy ordinary one in a shop.
The only way to bake healthy is to bake your own... in a breadmaker or oven
You know what goes in.. and you can regulate everything to suit your taste or health wise
Loads of fabulous recipes out there on the net... the best resturants don't buy in for cheap price...
they bake there own for taste... Shop bought is cheaper...but it's now classed with the zombie processed foods.;)
Edited by: "cburns" 26th Jun 2016
Happy to be educated here, can I have a reliable source to read about whether the legal bleaches used in the UK are harmful to us?

Mind you I much prefer a nice brown seeded loaf myself anyway
Love my breadmaker and it does work out cheaper baking your own. Plus no additives.
If you have a gluten problem then it's a must have.
I do mostly a 50% unbleached strong white and 50% wholemeal mix. Works out about 40p for a 500g loaf.
Haven't had my machine long so haven't experimented much but there's loads of different recipes to be tried.
I've started to use real butter again instead of so called healthy spreads. Nom nom.
LetoKynes

Happy to be educated here, can I have a reliable source to read about … Happy to be educated here, can I have a reliable source to read about whether the legal bleaches used in the UK are harmful to us? Mind you I much prefer a nice brown seeded loaf myself anyway


Have a look in mercola.com for more info about bleached flour, but..
It depends what you consider to be realiable source, i hope it is not NHS or govermental structures which are owned by coorparate business and big pharma.
Logic and common sense (and definitely not common belief) is your friend. There are relugalions which say that flour has to be certain nutrition value and if it loose it during the process (heat, chlorine baths, etc), then they are required to add artificiall iron, vitamins, etc. aif they do - it is more likely it was processed and bleached. For example in ASDA all flour has been... check yourself
I have learned techniques which they use to condition masses and eating flour products comes in top 5 on the list together with coffee, alkohol, cigaretts, tablets, junk food on Hollywood propaganda mashine.
Fordss

Have a look in mercola.com for more info about bleached flour, but..It … Have a look in mercola.com for more info about bleached flour, but..It depends what you consider to be realiable source, i hope it is not NHS or govermental structures which are owned by coorparate business and big pharma. Logic and common sense (and definitely not common belief) is your friend. There are relugalions which say that flour has to be certain nutrition value and if it loose it during the process (heat, chlorine baths, etc), then they are required to add artificiall iron, vitamins, etc. aif they do - it is more likely it was processed and bleached. For example in ASDA all flour has been... check yourself :)I have learned techniques which they use to condition masses and eating flour products comes in top 5 on the list together with coffee, alkohol, cigaretts, tablets, junk food on Hollywood propaganda mashine.



Don't forget to mention the shape changing lizard men!
I have a breadmaker and think it's great as I can decide what ingredients go in, but I don't think it's cheaper than buying bread in the shop.
A deal about a breadmaker had turned into deluded conspiracists saying the NHS and government can't be trusted because they read it on some website.

Wrap that bread in tinfoil.
SteveDave4

A deal about a breadmaker had turned into deluded conspiracists saying … A deal about a breadmaker had turned into deluded conspiracists saying the NHS and government can't be trusted because they read it on some website.Wrap that bread in tinfoil.


Ignore him. It's crack pots like him that the government uses to derail the thoughts of those seeking the truth about the Lizard men oO
Andrew James products are rubbish quality. Avoid.
For those thinking of buying a breadmaker, here's a few things I'd say:
1) Some people will end up using it every day - others will too for about a month and then it's a kitchen gadget that sits there most of the time. Some may still use it but switch to ready made packets of flour to reduce effort.
2) There are those health/purist types out there that believe that you need to source particular types of flour (unbleached) being the main reason for getting a breadmaker. That's not really true - most use normal flour. For us, the reasons are in the past being far away from the supermarket and we wanted fresh bread on some days of the week. Also nice to time it so that you wake up to fresh bread especially on colder winter days.
3) People believe that breadmaker bread tastes the absolute best - this is true to the owner of the machine, but they probably don't have confidence to put it into a bread contest. Whilst its good, supermarkets and bread manufacturers use every trick and additive (within safety guidelines) in the book to ensure your bread stays the softest and tastes best. Not saying people are lying here - some swear that their home made salad is the best and makes their bodies feel the best for the day but others think that the pizza and burger they had was better is all.
Original Poster
AMO

For those thinking of buying a breadmaker, here's a few things I'd say:1) … For those thinking of buying a breadmaker, here's a few things I'd say:1) Some people will end up using it every day - others will too for about a month and then it's a kitchen gadget that sits there most of the time. Some may still use it but switch to ready made packets of flour to reduce effort.2) There are those health/purist types out there that believe that you need to source particular types of flour (unbleached) being the main reason for getting a breadmaker. That's not really true - most use normal flour. For us, the reasons are in the past being far away from the supermarket and we wanted fresh bread on some days of the week. Also nice to time it so that you wake up to fresh bread especially on colder winter days.3) People believe that breadmaker bread tastes the absolute best - this is true to the owner of the machine, but they probably don't have confidence to put it into a bread contest. Whilst its good, supermarkets and bread manufacturers use every trick and additive (within safety guidelines) in the book to ensure your bread stays the softest and tastes best. Not saying people are lying here - some swear that their home made salad is the best and makes their bodies feel the best for the day but others think that the pizza and burger they had was better is all.



You have far too much time on your hands;)
AMO

Whilst its good, supermarkets and bread manufacturers use every trick and … Whilst its good, supermarkets and bread manufacturers use every trick and additive (within safety guidelines) in the book to ensure your bread stays the softest and tastes best.



I don't agree here, what supermarkets and bread manufacturers do is use every trick in the book to make the most profitable bread. Unfortunately the key to nice tasting bread is to give dough plenty of time to rise and that's the first thing that goes out of the window in modern bread manufacturing because the slower your bread rises the less you can produce in any given time.

Search on the Chorelywood bread process if you want more details on how modern bread is made.
DrClifford

It would be waste of money, space and health if you buy bread maker and … It would be waste of money, space and health if you buy bread maker and buy ordinary bread mix or flour.Everyone has different reasons why they bake their own bread, but i think main should be avoiding bleached fine milled four , which covers majority of the market in UK. They dont mention this in ingredient section because its considered to be an industry standard. Same story with bleached (very unhealthy) white sugar.To bake healthy (or rather not poisinuos) loaf will cost you considerably more than to buy ordinary one in a shop.



They don't mention it because they don't use it. It's been illegal to add bleaching agents to flour in the UK and EU for almost 20 years.

I don't know where you get your information from but the white sugar isn't bleached either as pure sugar crystals are naturally colourless as a result of the molasses and such being removed.

LetoKynes

Happy to be educated here, can I have a reliable source to read about … Happy to be educated here, can I have a reliable source to read about whether the legal bleaches used in the UK are harmful to us? Mind you I much prefer a nice brown seeded loaf myself anyway



They're not used as covered by the The Bread and Flour Regulations 1998

Note that as part of these legislative changes, the use of the flour … Note that as part of these legislative changes, the use of the flour bleaching agents, e.g. chlorine and chlorine dioxide is no longer allowed. Therefore claims for the use of unbleached flour are meaningless and should be avoided.


SteveDave4

A deal about a breadmaker had turned into deluded conspiracists saying … A deal about a breadmaker had turned into deluded conspiracists saying the NHS and government can't be trusted because they read it on some website.Wrap that bread in tinfoil.



You must be new to this site.
KiNG

you still need to buy the mix to make the bread.



​don't buy bread mix, get a good flour and some yeast (I'm sure everyone has the other ingredients) and make bread superior to that processed junk that's commonly available. expensive? away and have a word with yourself
BarneyL

I don't agree here, what supermarkets and bread manufacturers do is use … I don't agree here, what supermarkets and bread manufacturers do is use every trick in the book to make the most profitable bread. Unfortunately the key to nice tasting bread is to give dough plenty of time to rise and that's the first thing that goes out of the window in modern bread manufacturing because the slower your bread rises the less you can produce in any given time.Search on the Chorelywood bread process if you want more details on how modern bread is made.



I agree, Chorleywood bread is truly awful but having used a breadmaker, this is not the same as traditional slow proving of loaves either, somewhat in-between.

If you really want very good bread, I am afraid it is more hands-on only, (OK mixing mechanically is fine, but it needs longer proving, or try a sourdough perhaps) similarly if you want good pizza dough, it's a slow rise in the fridge over a few days.
Your text here
Been making bread by hand for a few years now and it's definitely the best way if you can manage it. If not a breadmaker is definitely better than supermarket or most bakery bread as it'll still have more time to 'prove' and get flavour whilst breaking down the less great stuff in the wheat.

If in doubt use a stoneground flour as it has more nutrition as its not heated during grinding so keeps more of the goodness (much like steaming does vs. boiling).

I've found Shipton Mill and Bacheldre Watermill are really good with lots of flavour and a wide choice. Bacheldre Watermill even do a stoneground white flour.
LetoKynes

Happy to be educated here, can I have a reliable source to read about … Happy to be educated here, can I have a reliable source to read about whether the legal bleaches used in the UK are harmful to us? Mind you I much prefer a nice brown seeded loaf myself anyway



​hiya
If your'e waiting for all unnecesary harmful substances to become illegal...

Read up on fluoride, excipients in vaccines, the milk industry, meat farming.. pesticides levels.. monsanto practices .. you could go on... all legal..

I would say do your own research and read some books, that way you can make your own informed decisions. We all make our decisions based on various factors including ethics, cost, religion, green politics and even availability...

Its not always so simple... but I would say try to avoid known harmful substances where possible.
Might not have as many functions (and doesn't have the weighing scale), but I bought one of these recently and it's more than up to the job. An extra year's warranty, too - ALDI Premium Bread Maker
Edited by: "hollger" 26th Jun 2016
Can't see anywhere if it has a retractable paddle? I don't think it does sadly.
Banned
Fresh home baked bread worth every penny
Very tempted. I don't care much for baking my own bread, but the dough-making is really useful. You can make your own pizza, dim-sum, cake, noodle, amd etc! Wonder if they have a cheaper dough-making machine.
Is this bread maker easy to operate with a lizard hand? It's a hassle having to change shape to add ingredients.
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