Antec Mercury 360 All-In-One CPU Liquid Cooler £64.99 @ Amazon - PRIME EXCLUSIVE PRICE
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Antec Mercury 360 All-In-One CPU Liquid Cooler £64.99 @ Amazon - PRIME EXCLUSIVE PRICE

£64.99£79.9919%Amazon Deals
25
Found 4th Jul
Antec Mercury 360 All-In-One CPU Liquid Cooler PRIME EXCLUSIVE PRICE - cheapest I can find elsewhere is £79.99 + P&P at Scan.

Some good reviews - although it seems to favour silence over outright performance..
e.g. Review conclusion

No doubt cold votes cos its Prime Exclusive - but I think enough HUKD members have Prime membership etc...

I was going to order a Noctua air cooler - but my son convinced me to for this...
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With all these pipes and fans and heatsinks on modern PC's, I propose the time is right for a steam punk inspired one with plenty of polished brass.
I love this cooler. But be warned it's massive
Roger_Irrelevant46 m ago

With all these pipes and fans and heatsinks on modern PC's, I propose the …With all these pipes and fans and heatsinks on modern PC's, I propose the time is right for a steam punk inspired one with plenty of polished brass.


There's almost no heatpipes (other than graphics cards/CPU coolers) in modern PC's these days, and even heatsinks have massively dwindled or are non-existent. Computers use less power than ever, so not needed. And brass, as far as I know, has never been used in computers.

I'm afraid to say your steampunk party should have been held far earlier!

(Customary "You're fun at parties" comment).

As for this product, I bought one of these at £50 but the temperature results didn't blow me away and it was quite loud. Once you have delidded your CPU 99% of people won't need a radiator this big compared to even a small air cooler.
be_vigilant33 m ago

I love this cooler. But be warned it's massive


About 360 mm long i reckon
Very fair price for a 360mm AIO. I think it has been cheaper before, seem to remember about £50-£55, but only very fleetingly. That said I think this is about the going rate for this on Amazon rather than a special offer as such, certainly been that price the last few times I looked at it.

Only problem with 360mm coolers is the amount of space you need to mount them in a case. Anything less than a full tower case and forget it, even most full tower cases aren't equipped for them. I suppose one could bodge it in to an incompatible case if you are comfortable with a drill but still I'm not convinced they are a massive step up from 240mm coolers that will work with a LOT more case designs.

Personally, after owning two Corsair AIOs in years gone by I have moved back to all air cooling for my PCs, just because it takes a point of failure out of the equation (pump and piping) and modern CPUs are generally so efficient that you don't need the greatest cooling ever unless you are a hardcore overclocker or running bleeding edge Threadripper or similar CPUs...
Edited by: "ST3123" 4th Jul
Salfordgirl12 h, 32 m ago

There's almost no heatpipes (other than graphics cards/CPU coolers) in …There's almost no heatpipes (other than graphics cards/CPU coolers) in modern PC's these days, and even heatsinks have massively dwindled or are non-existent. Computers use less power than ever, so not needed. And brass, as far as I know, has never been used in computers.I'm afraid to say your steampunk party should have been held far earlier! (Customary "You're fun at parties" comment).As for this product, I bought one of these at £50 but the temperature results didn't blow me away and it was quite loud. Once you have delidded your CPU 99% of people won't need a radiator this big compared to even a small air cooler.



I’m pretty sure nearly all of that is wrong

Every half decent air cooler has heat pipes.

Heatsinks have got bigger and bigger over the years.

Computers use more power than ever at the high end (TDPs north of 150W for Threadripper and the i9s, 1080Tis are 250W).

Brass has been done (second link is a steampunk build even:

bit-tech.net/gui…/1/

bit-tech.net/rev…/3/

You still need decent cooling after delidding. In fact decent cooling is probably more important as pre-delidding you’re limited by the crap TIM that Intel use. After delidding you actually can benefit from decent cooling
Edited by: "Minstadave" 4th Jul
ST312312 m ago

Very fair price for a 360mm AIO. I think it has been cheaper before, seem …Very fair price for a 360mm AIO. I think it has been cheaper before, seem to remember about £50-£55, but only very fleetingly. That said I think this is about the going rate for this on Amazon rather than a special offer as such, certainly been that price the last few times I looked at it. Only problem with 360mm coolers is the amount of space you need to mount them in a case. Anything less than a full tower case and forget it, even most full tower cases aren't equipped for them. I suppose one could bodge it in to an incompatible case if you are comfortable with a drill but still I'm not convinced they are a massive step up from 240mm coolers that will work with a LOT more case designs. Personally, after owning two Corsair AIOs in years gone by I have moved back to all air cooling for my PCs, just because it takes a point of failure out of the equation (pump and piping) and modern CPUs are generally so efficient that you don't need the greatest cooling ever unless you are a hardcore overclocker or running bleeding edge Threadripper or similar CPUs...


I bought this a few weeks ago for a build for a work colleague and yes seems to be the going rate. Though i would say a lot of mid tower cases that have power supply basements have removable panels to fit these rads, I have a Meshify C and he has a Corsair 275R and they both do.

Just of note, these are not controllable RGB, they are only blue and the pump is supposedly changeable with temp, though I've never seen it not blue.
Minstadave4th Jul

I’m pretty sure nearly all of that is wrongEvery half decent air cooler h …I’m pretty sure nearly all of that is wrongEvery half decent air cooler has heat pipes.Heatsinks have got bigger and bigger over the years. Computers use more power than ever at the high end (TDPs north of 150W for Threadripper and the i9s, 1080Tis are 250W).Brass has been done (second link is a steampunk build even:http://bit-tech.net/guides/modding/watercooling/water-cooling-with-hardline-tubing-guide-brass-and-carbon-fibre/1/https://www.bit-tech.net/reviews/modding/mod-of-the-month/mod-of-the-month-june-2012/3/You still need decent cooking after delidding. In fact decent cooling is probably more important as pre-delidding you’re limited by the crap TIM that Intel use. After delidding you actually can benefit from decent cooling



"Every half decent aircooler has heatpipes", Tut, someone needs to learn to read. "Other than cpu coolers". Of course every aircooler has a heatpipe - I even stated as such in my post.

Heatpipes use to be on the PCH of a motherboard and on the VRM. Hell, many motherboards had inbuilt fans on these components. Today we don't.

"Heatsinks have got bigger and bigger", Heatsinks have not gotten bigger for practical reasons. Look at the PCH cooler in your motherboard. Look at the VRAM cooler on your motherboard. These are smaller than ever, some boards don't even use a heatsink at all.

Some heatsinks, such as a Noctua Nh-d15, are huge. This isn't because they need to be, it's because people care about low temperatures, even if there is no practical upside for 99% of people.

The node items are produced on has gone down - the smaller the node, the less power it generally consumes. Compare the temperature and power of a r9 290x, a 350w card, to something like a GTX 1080, 170-180w card.

"Computers use more power than ever". Not true.

On the GPU side a GTX 480, released 8 years ago, can use up to 450w of power alone. An R9 290x 350w. Even a GTX 1080ti uses less than that, around 280-300w.

On the CPU side you're right, to an extent. A threadripper 1950x has a TDP of 180 watts. A 2005 Xeon 7020 has a TDP of 165W. The only reason wattage has gone up so high is because there is a "core war", where both Amd and Intel are throwing more cores than ever before. If we compare a 4 core 8 thread CPU of today to one of the past, which do you think uses more power?

It's possible to make a computer that uses less electricity than a light bulb these days. Do you think that was possible 50 years ago? For 95% of cases computers use less power now than ever before, the only exception being professional level use (i9 etc) and some gaming examples.

It baffles me that people on here love to argue so much, considering it's a deals website. Are people really that bored that this passes as entertainment? I make an off the cuff comment and for some reason you feel the bizarre need to prove everything I said wrong - even going so far as to find a custom computer that decides to use brass for no other reason than aesthetics.

Find a hobby.
Salfordgirl15 m ago

"Every half decent aircooler has heatpipes", Tut, someone needs to learn …"Every half decent aircooler has heatpipes", Tut, someone needs to learn to read. "Other than cpu coolers". Of course every aircooler has a heatpipe - I even stated as such in my post.Heatpipes use to be on the PCH of a motherboard and on the VRM. Hell, many motherboards had inbuilt fans on these components. Today we don't."Heatsinks have got bigger and bigger", Heatsinks have not gotten bigger for practical reasons. Look at the PCH cooler in your motherboard. Look at the VRAM cooler on your motherboard. These are smaller than ever, some boards don't even use a heatsink at all.Some heatsinks, such as a Noctua Nh-d15, are huge. This isn't because they need to be, it's because people care about low temperatures, even if there is no practical upside for 99% of people.The node items are produced on has gone down - the smaller the node, the less power it generally consumes. Compare the temperature and power of a r9 290x, a 350w card, to something like a GTX 1080, 170-180w card."Computers use more power than ever". Not true. On the GPU side a GTX 480, released 8 years ago, can use up to 450w of power alone. An R9 290x 350w. Even a GTX 1080ti uses less than that, around 280-300w.On the CPU side you're right, to an extent. A threadripper 1950x has a TDP of 180 watts. A 2005 Xeon 7020 has a TDP of 165W. The only reason wattage has gone up so high is because there is a "core war", where both Amd and Intel are throwing more cores than ever before. If we compare a 4 core 8 thread CPU of today to one of the past, which do you think uses more power? It's possible to make a computer that uses less electricity than a light bulb these days. Do you think that was possible 50 years ago? For 95% of cases computers use less power now than ever before, the only exception being professional level use (i9 etc) and some gaming examples.It baffles me that people on here love to argue so much, considering it's a deals website. Are people really that bored that this passes as entertainment? I make an off the cuff comment and for some reason you feel the bizarre need to prove everything I said wrong - even going so far as to find a custom computer that decides to use brass for no other reason than aesthetics.Find a hobby.


Hang on...... didn't you start this by being the 1st to come back on the original comment??? No wonder you're baffled.....
It has been cheaper, And it's been this price for months.
Salfordgirl118 m ago

"Every half decent aircooler has heatpipes", Tut, someone needs to learn …"Every half decent aircooler has heatpipes", Tut, someone needs to learn to read. "Other than cpu coolers". Of course every aircooler has a heatpipe - I even stated as such in my post.Heatpipes use to be on the PCH of a motherboard and on the VRM. Hell, many motherboards had inbuilt fans on these components. Today we don't."Heatsinks have got bigger and bigger", Heatsinks have not gotten bigger for practical reasons. Look at the PCH cooler in your motherboard. Look at the VRAM cooler on your motherboard. These are smaller than ever, some boards don't even use a heatsink at all.Some heatsinks, such as a Noctua Nh-d15, are huge. This isn't because they need to be, it's because people care about low temperatures, even if there is no practical upside for 99% of people.The node items are produced on has gone down - the smaller the node, the less power it generally consumes. Compare the temperature and power of a r9 290x, a 350w card, to something like a GTX 1080, 170-180w card."Computers use more power than ever". Not true. On the GPU side a GTX 480, released 8 years ago, can use up to 450w of power alone. An R9 290x 350w. Even a GTX 1080ti uses less than that, around 280-300w.On the CPU side you're right, to an extent. A threadripper 1950x has a TDP of 180 watts. A 2005 Xeon 7020 has a TDP of 165W. The only reason wattage has gone up so high is because there is a "core war", where both Amd and Intel are throwing more cores than ever before. If we compare a 4 core 8 thread CPU of today to one of the past, which do you think uses more power? It's possible to make a computer that uses less electricity than a light bulb these days. Do you think that was possible 50 years ago? For 95% of cases computers use less power now than ever before, the only exception being professional level use (i9 etc) and some gaming examples.It baffles me that people on here love to argue so much, considering it's a deals website. Are people really that bored that this passes as entertainment? I make an off the cuff comment and for some reason you feel the bizarre need to prove everything I said wrong - even going so far as to find a custom computer that decides to use brass for no other reason than aesthetics.Find a hobby.


How do you write so much and yet be entirely incorrect?
Salfordgirl11 h, 17 m ago

"Every half decent aircooler has heatpipes", Tut, someone needs to learn …"Every half decent aircooler has heatpipes", Tut, someone needs to learn to read. "Other than cpu coolers". Of course every aircooler has a heatpipe - I even stated as such in my post.Heatpipes use to be on the PCH of a motherboard and on the VRM. Hell, many motherboards had inbuilt fans on these components. Today we don't."Heatsinks have got bigger and bigger", Heatsinks have not gotten bigger for practical reasons. Look at the PCH cooler in your motherboard. Look at the VRAM cooler on your motherboard. These are smaller than ever, some boards don't even use a heatsink at all.Some heatsinks, such as a Noctua Nh-d15, are huge. This isn't because they need to be, it's because people care about low temperatures, even if there is no practical upside for 99% of people.The node items are produced on has gone down - the smaller the node, the less power it generally consumes. Compare the temperature and power of a r9 290x, a 350w card, to something like a GTX 1080, 170-180w card."Computers use more power than ever". Not true. On the GPU side a GTX 480, released 8 years ago, can use up to 450w of power alone. An R9 290x 350w. Even a GTX 1080ti uses less than that, around 280-300w.On the CPU side you're right, to an extent. A threadripper 1950x has a TDP of 180 watts. A 2005 Xeon 7020 has a TDP of 165W. The only reason wattage has gone up so high is because there is a "core war", where both Amd and Intel are throwing more cores than ever before. If we compare a 4 core 8 thread CPU of today to one of the past, which do you think uses more power? It's possible to make a computer that uses less electricity than a light bulb these days. Do you think that was possible 50 years ago? For 95% of cases computers use less power now than ever before, the only exception being professional level use (i9 etc) and some gaming examples.It baffles me that people on here love to argue so much, considering it's a deals website. Are people really that bored that this passes as entertainment? I make an off the cuff comment and for some reason you feel the bizarre need to prove everything I said wrong - even going so far as to find a custom computer that decides to use brass for no other reason than aesthetics.Find a hobby.



Oh dear - Heatpipes have become more prevalent not less, that's obvious to all but a simpleton. The reason they're not on motherboards anymore is all the power hungry components are now on the CPU die, not the old fashioned northbridge which used to contain the memory controller.

Plenty of boards still use a heatpipe on the VRM. Gigabyte x470 for example. Demand on VRMs is more than ever. Threadripper 2 is going up to 250W.

Heatsinks have got bigger, as is evidenced through the progression from 80mm to 120mm and now 140mm fan support. Just look back and see what we used to use and that's obvious. Look at the size of box coolers, we used to have tiny extruded aluminium jobs and now we're getting pretty solid offerings from AMD in the form of their Wraith series.

Nodes have got smaller, transistor counts have gone up. Smaller processes make cooling harder as the heat is generated in a smaller area, so temps have gone up.

A GTX 480 never consumed 480W and a R290 never consumed 350W - you've just made these numbers up. Figures for the 290 got above 300W with a worst case scenario peak load, but then you're not comparing apples to oranges. Vega 64 will peak above 400W if you want to use worst case scenarios

You've even given examples of CPU TDP going up then tried to blame it on the "Core War" - that's been happening for years, it's progress. It's been happening since the start:

34240439-JVeis.jpg
You're probably easily baffled. It wouldn't surprise me looking at your posts.
Edited by: "Minstadave" 4th Jul
Salfordgirl12 h, 24 m ago

"Every half decent aircooler has heatpipes", Tut, someone needs to learn …"Every half decent aircooler has heatpipes", Tut, someone needs to learn to read. "Other than cpu coolers". Of course every aircooler has a heatpipe - I even stated as such in my post.Heatpipes use to be on the PCH of a motherboard and on the VRM. Hell, many motherboards had inbuilt fans on these components. Today we don't."Heatsinks have got bigger and bigger", Heatsinks have not gotten bigger for practical reasons. Look at the PCH cooler in your motherboard. Look at the VRAM cooler on your motherboard. These are smaller than ever, some boards don't even use a heatsink at all.Some heatsinks, such as a Noctua Nh-d15, are huge. This isn't because they need to be, it's because people care about low temperatures, even if there is no practical upside for 99% of people.The node items are produced on has gone down - the smaller the node, the less power it generally consumes. Compare the temperature and power of a r9 290x, a 350w card, to something like a GTX 1080, 170-180w card."Computers use more power than ever". Not true. On the GPU side a GTX 480, released 8 years ago, can use up to 450w of power alone. An R9 290x 350w. Even a GTX 1080ti uses less than that, around 280-300w.On the CPU side you're right, to an extent. A threadripper 1950x has a TDP of 180 watts. A 2005 Xeon 7020 has a TDP of 165W. The only reason wattage has gone up so high is because there is a "core war", where both Amd and Intel are throwing more cores than ever before. If we compare a 4 core 8 thread CPU of today to one of the past, which do you think uses more power? It's possible to make a computer that uses less electricity than a light bulb these days. Do you think that was possible 50 years ago? For 95% of cases computers use less power now than ever before, the only exception being professional level use (i9 etc) and some gaming examples.It baffles me that people on here love to argue so much, considering it's a deals website. Are people really that bored that this passes as entertainment? I make an off the cuff comment and for some reason you feel the bizarre need to prove everything I said wrong - even going so far as to find a custom computer that decides to use brass for no other reason than aesthetics.Find a hobby.


Yes darnit! I'm bored on my lunch break and want to argue to pass the time! :P

I'm not sure that power consumption has decreased overall, looking back pentium 4s were in the 30 to 115W range but certainly these days you get more performance per watt while our need for performance has dropped not increased as quickly so CPUs will spend less time at peak power draw. I was amazed by the Ryzen 2700X, it beats my pair of xeon e5-2670s for performance while drawing a little less than half the power.
Edited by: "CampGareth" 4th Jul
CampGareth1 h, 42 m ago

Yes darnit! I'm bored on my lunch break and want to argue to pass the …Yes darnit! I'm bored on my lunch break and want to argue to pass the time! :PI'm not sure that power consumption has decreased overall, looking back pentium 4s were in the 30 to 115W range but certainly these days you get more performance per watt while our need for performance has dropped so CPUs will spend less time at peak power draw. I was amazed by the Ryzen 2700X, it beats my pair of xeon e5-2670s for performance while drawing a little less than half the power.


There's definitely a bell curve imo, but it's rising back up now due Intel panicking over Ryzen and Intels 10nm node being incredibly delayed. The Bloomfield i7's used 135watts and could use up a huge amount of power. There were no "low power" variants either.
34241811-3ZyoR.jpg

The first i7 motherboards also had heatpipes galore on them:


34241811-PRLvQ.jpg
You barely ever see a motherboard like this these days. Some of them don't even come with VRM or PCH heatsinks. Options for "low power, high performance" have never been so prevalent as far as I'm concerned, you only need to look at the laptops/NUC's of today to confirm this. An i7-8700T has a TDP of 35w which is insane for a 6 core CPU at 4GHZ.
34242099-tI8NT.jpg
Salfordgirl127 m ago

There's definitely a bell curve imo, but it's rising back up now due Intel …There's definitely a bell curve imo, but it's rising back up now due Intel panicking over Ryzen and Intels 10nm node being incredibly delayed. The Bloomfield i7's used 135watts and could use up a huge amount of power. There were no "low power" variants either.[Image] The first i7 motherboards also had heatpipes galore on them:[Image] You barely ever see a motherboard like this these days. Some of them don't even come with VRM or PCH heatsinks. Options for "low power, high performance" have never been so prevalent as far as I'm concerned, you only need to look at the laptops/NUC's of today to confirm this. An i7-8700T has a TDP of 35w which is insane for a 6 core CPU at 4GHZ.



Have you not taken a look at the latest iterations of motherboards? They are absolutely chalk full of head spreaders and heat sinks.


This is not some exceptional motherboard, this is pretty standard. There is headspreaders on basically everything.
Edited by: "Nate1492" 4th Jul
What you're doing to warrant a rad this size is beyond me. Mine is a 3rd the size of this and I've got an i5 4670K.
MadeInBeats2 m ago

What you're doing to warrant a rad this size is beyond me. Mine is a 3rd …What you're doing to warrant a rad this size is beyond me. Mine is a 3rd the size of this and I've got an i5 4670K.


The bigger the rad or heatsink, the quieter it can be whilst maintaining good temps.
Nate14922 h, 8 m ago

[Image] Have you not taken a look at the latest iterations of …[Image] Have you not taken a look at the latest iterations of motherboards? They are absolutely chalk full of head spreaders and heat sinks.This is not some exceptional motherboard, this is pretty standard. There is headspreaders on basically everything.



Those aren't heat pipes or heatsinks. They're just flat pieces of metal made to look pretty and which have almost no thermal performance at all. Some of these pieces of metal actually make the components hotter, as they trap air.

A heatpipe has to be a copper pipe usually with copper/aluminium fins attached to it.

A heatsink is generally finned for better surface area.

"This isn't some exceptional motherboard", mate it's a Godlike. Those are generally the best motherboard in that chipset family. And even then it doesn't use any heatpipes. The only motherboards that do are pro-sumer -x99, x79, x299 etc.
Edited by: "Salfordgirl1" 4th Jul
Optimus_Toaster10 m ago

The bigger the rad or heatsink, the quieter it can be whilst maintaining …The bigger the rad or heatsink, the quieter it can be whilst maintaining good temps.



Not when the pump itself is the loudest thing in your case...
Let's get a grip here as very few non-professional users own a CPU with a TDP higher than 140W and most of those are over £500 and by a large margin in some cases which is why they are a small niche.
But for over-clocking you can go well above that in actual wattage used and that has been the case for many years.
So cooling such a high wattage CPU is a niche as it always has been for non-professional users.
Optimus_Toaster43 m ago

The bigger the rad or heatsink, the quieter it can be whilst maintaining …The bigger the rad or heatsink, the quieter it can be whilst maintaining good temps.


I don't know... mine's whisper quiet and it's push/pull. Even at 100% fan it's pretty quiet..
MadeInBeats5 h, 9 m ago

I don't know... mine's whisper quiet and it's push/pull. Even at 100% fan …I don't know... mine's whisper quiet and it's push/pull. Even at 100% fan it's pretty quiet..


Unless it is completely silent then it won't be quiet enough for some users.
Optimus_Toaster7 h, 32 m ago

Unless it is completely silent then it won't be quiet enough for some …Unless it is completely silent then it won't be quiet enough for some users.


Unless I stick my head right next to the case, it's completely quiet. I think some users are just a bit OCD... all too common around PC builders/gamers.
Edited by: "MadeInBeats" 5th Jul
"It's possible to make a computer that uses less electricity than a light bulb these days. Do you think that was possible 50 years ago?"
Hmmm .. what sort of light bulb ? led ? or incandescent?
50 years ago? 1968 ..HP 9100a .. first desktop computer , algol, basic and Pascal, Intel just formed as a company.
Salfordgirl116 h, 34 m ago

Those aren't heat pipes or heatsinks. They're just flat pieces of metal …Those aren't heat pipes or heatsinks. They're just flat pieces of metal made to look pretty and which have almost no thermal performance at all. Some of these pieces of metal actually make the components hotter, as they trap air.A heatpipe has to be a copper pipe usually with copper/aluminium fins attached to it.A heatsink is generally finned for better surface area."This isn't some exceptional motherboard", mate it's a Godlike. Those are generally the best motherboard in that chipset family. And even then it doesn't use any heatpipes. The only motherboards that do are pro-sumer -x99, x79, x299 etc.



It isn't exceptional as in the heatsinks are common throughout all ranges, yeah, I grabbed the 500$ one, but here are ones at every price point, not even 'prosumer' levels.

Mini ITX board for under £100. This is an H370, the budget version of Z370.

34250785-MQdx3.jpg
Heatpipes and heatsinks all over.

Take a look yourself, it's common throughout AMD and Intel motherboards. Stop trying to stick to your narrative, it's wrong. People have showed you how in the last 20 years CPU wattage has greatly increased.

Most MSI boards have a similar look, the 'Godlike' cost isn't the shrouds or heatsinks. Have a browse. newegg.com/Pro…106

The gaming lineup looks very much like the 'Godlike' one, I didn't realize I even chose the godlike gaming version as it looks very similar to their Gaming 5 version (sells for around 150-170£.

Here's a good set of motherboard comparisons.

anandtech.com/sho…/23


Yes, the Vacuum Tube, size of a room, computers from 70 years ago use more, but not over small areas! The modern CPU has become more and more dense in terms of power consumption and heat dissipation.

Oh, and you're linking a $300 motherboard, just for your info.

bit-tech.net/rev…/1/

Anyway, if you want to play the 'oh but thats $500' card, if you buy a like for like product, high range motherboards always have more flashy features.
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