Apollo Contour Folding Bike £160 delivered was £250 @ Halfords
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Apollo Contour Folding Bike £160 delivered was £250 @ Halfords

13
Found 24th May
The Apollo Contour Folding Bike is a dream for the commuter and relaxed holiday cyclists alike. Made from an aluminium frame, this folding bike is designed to be extremely easy to mount and very lightweight. Including 1x pedal that folds and the other is contained within bike when folded, no need to tuck out of the way.

Frame: Lightweight aluminum
Forks: Rigid steel for durability and comfort
Gears: 7 Speed for easy commuting
Brakes: Aluminium V-brakes for controlled stopping
Wheels: 20" aluminium rims with rubber tyres for comfort and stability

Also includes mudguards, luggage rack and kickstand, making this bike an ideal choice for commuters.

Top comments

optimus_prime2

looks like a girls bike ;-( Horrible



Folding bikes are only for men who are completely secure in their masculinity.

13 Comments

13kg is decent considering all the accessories that are fitted, and the reviews are very positive. A bonus for beginners is the free service after 6 weeks.
Edited by: "Muig1972" 24th May

looks like a girls bike ;-( Horrible

optimus_prime2

looks like a girls bike ;-( Horrible



Folding bikes are only for men who are completely secure in their masculinity.

what a load of Bickerton

optimus_prime2

looks like a girls bike ;-( Horrible



Back to eighties...

It's awesome to commute in cities. I use the old one gear as interpreter for nearby city venues. I drop my car a little away from centre, pick the bike from boot and swishing to work. so hot from me as mobility essential

Very much like the Schwinn Loop, folding bike aimed slightly more towards females and the elderly due to the ease of mounting the bike. Looks great value but being Apollo it is Halfords entry level brand with entry level often unbranded components. Not a criticism just reality, still has a proper Shimano derailleur. Considering the frame style which often has a weight penalty, using aluminium is a good solution. Seems great value.

What weight could you get to if, you stripped it of non essential parts and changed it to a single speed bike? 11kg or less?

The frame protector on the handlebar stem doesn't look like its concealing a height adjuster so bear that in mind that you have no way of adjusting handlebar height.

POWYSWALES: much better than the previous folders you've posted, moving in the right direction.

This should be fine for occasional short trips but if you need something decent for more regular use I'm afraid you'll need to spend £300 upwards on a Dahon or similar.

Two comments about the nonsense of male frames? Surely that is a 19th century idea which should have died 100+ years ago.
There really is no advantage for in a man's frame expect for surviving big head-on crashes (the frame, not the driver!).
Step-through is better in every way. Safer too as you never know when some car tries to squeeze you on a junction and you have to quickly get off.

Gkains

Two comments about the nonsense of male frames? Surely that is a 19th … Two comments about the nonsense of male frames? Surely that is a 19th century idea which should have died 100+ years ago.There really is no advantage for in a man's frame expect for surviving big head-on crashes (the frame, not the driver!).Step-through is better in every way. Safer too as you never know when some car tries to squeeze you on a junction and you have to quickly get off.



Male frames are often stronger and as frame size increases as does strengthening due to the expected extra weight. The huge Btwin recall of 4 years production of bikes was as you can see what looks on first inspection horrifically weak design and turns out actually was and hugely dangerous with collapsing under load. I have an instruction book for one of my old bikes and it has 125kg for the male frame and if I remember rightly 110kg for the woman's frame. It was a basic fully rigid mountain bike.

http://www.bike-eu.com/laws-regulations/nieuws/2017/3/decathlon-recalls-2012-2016-e-bikes-10129228

http://bike-eu.com.s3-eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/app/uploads/2017/03/Bike-Europe-Decthlon-recall-272x210.jpg

We don't know the weight limit for this bike but it could be lower than the normal folding bikes that Halfords sell. I'm not saying it is but it could be based on the step through design.

bonzobanana

Male frames are often stronger and as frame size increases as does … Male frames are often stronger and as frame size increases as does strengthening due to the expected extra weight. The huge Btwin recall of 4 years production of bikes was as you can see what looks on first inspection horrifically weak design and turns out actually was and hugely dangerous with collapsing under load. I have an instruction book for one of my old bikes and it has 125kg for the male frame and if I remember rightly 110kg for the woman's frame. It was a basic fully rigid mountain bike.http://www.bike-eu.com/laws-regulations/nieuws/2017/3/decathlon-recalls-2012-2016-e-bikes-10129228We don't know the weight limit for this bike but it could be lower than the normal folding bikes that Halfords sell. I'm not saying it is but it could be based on the step through design.



Okay, but that is just Decathlon's QC being bad. Step-through needs to be extra strong at the narrow point. But there are plenty of stronger female frames than step-through.

I have a few bikes (bought used ones in the autumn, so basically £200+ bikes for around £50 without too much wear), only one is a men's frame and I'd never get another men's frame. Now, I do sometimes use a basket on the back carrier or transport things in my bicycle trailer and that is when I really notices that men's frames are truly dangerous.

Looks like a good deal on a decent folding bike. Might pick one up for wife.

Positive reviews but no size guide. I'm quite tall and would like to know if this would be suitable
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