ASDA LED GU10 5W (10 bulbs) £20
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ASDA LED GU10 5W (10 bulbs) £20

57
Found 23rd Feb 2016
LED Dimmable GU10 (white bulb) 345lm. Saves you money on your energy bills and lasts a very long time - up to 12x longer than a standard halogen bulb.
*In store and Online*

57 Comments

Original Poster

Revhead007

http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/vtac-5w-40w-gu10-led-warm-white-spotlight-with-2-year-warranty-99p-home-bargains-2399764


That's a good price but these are better quality and are dimmable.
Dimmable LED light bulbs are normally a lot more expensive than £2 each.

Original Poster

Revhead007

http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/vtac-5w-40w-gu10-led-warm-white-spotlight-with-2-year-warranty-99p-home-bargains-2399764



Good price for normal gu10 led bulbs!

These ones from ASDA are dimmable and better quality.
Dimmable bulbs normally cost a lot more than £2 each.

Will keep an eye out for these next time i'm in Asda!
Good price, especially if they're actually dimmable.

smileybob

That's a good price but these are better quality and are … That's a good price but these are better quality and are dimmable.Dimmable LED light bulbs are normally a lot more expensive than £2 each.


My Bad. I should've read the full description. Didn't realise yours are dimmable

345 lumens though, wouldn't be using these to replace kitchen gu10. Probably more suited to mood lighting or somewhere that doesn't require decent illumination.

Banned

americanv8

345 lumens though, wouldn't be using these to replace kitchen gu10. … 345 lumens though, wouldn't be using these to replace kitchen gu10. Probably more suited to mood lighting or somewhere that doesn't require decent illumination.



What on earth are you on about? These are the way forward and the actual light produced at point of source is brilliant. HEAT added.

Banned

smugjojo

What on earth are you on about? These are the way forward and the actual … What on earth are you on about? These are the way forward and the actual light produced at point of source is brilliant. HEAT added.

Forgot to add I have 5w similar to these in my recessed kitchen lighting, so as tried and tested by smugjojo.

nice find op, heat

Brilliant value for money. Thanks.

smugjojo

What on earth are you on about? These are the way forward and the actual … What on earth are you on about? These are the way forward and the actual light produced at point of source is brilliant. HEAT added.


Actually americanv8 is correct. These are very low lumen and wouldn't give off a huge amount of light. If you have a very small kitchen they might suffice but if you want to have your kitchen properly illuminated you should be looking at something between 700 - 900 lumen per lamp.

As a rough rule of thumb a traditional 60W light bulb gives off 'about' 800-850 lumens.

OP - have some heat though as an introduction to LED these are a good find. Other users note though that dimmable LEDs will NOT run on a traditional dimming system.


Edited by: "ipswich78" 23rd Feb 2016

Did my whole house with mid-range LEDs but couldn't find a cheap dimmable. Good find.

what's the color temperature of these bulbs; warm white or cool white. It says "White bulb" doesn't say anything about color temperature.

ipswich78

Actually americanv8 is correct. These are very low lumen and wouldn't … Actually americanv8 is correct. These are very low lumen and wouldn't give off a huge amount of light. If you have a very small kitchen they might suffice but if you want to have your kitchen properly illuminated you should be looking at something between 700 - 900 lumen per lamp.As a rough rule of thumb a traditional 60W light bulb gives off 'about' 800-850 lumens.OP - have some heat though as an introduction to LED these are a good find. Other users note though that dimmable LEDs will NOT run on a traditional dimming system.



Can you recommend a bright white GU10 LED for a bathroom?

Any good for the garden?

my local asda got warm white color

deal_or_no_deal_

Can you recommend a bright white GU10 LED for a bathroom?


Verbatim and Philips do some very nice LED GU10, if you want 'bright white' you're probably looking at either a 3000k or for a more white, clinical type light 4000k (this is often referred to as the Colour Temperature). I'd look at either the Verbatim LED VxRadiator or the Philips MASTER LEDspot MV Value Dimtone GU10.

Quoting ipswich78 :"""Other users note though that dimmable LEDs will NOT run on a traditional dimming system."""

So do I have to buy a new LED compatible dimmer switch? Am new to LEDs and my Lidl multi-colour LED ( with remote) will only dim in steps and not very much at that, would these ones have diming similar to old incandescent bulbs, i.e. continuous ?

dohouch

Quoting ipswich78 :"""Other users note though that dimmable LEDs will NOT … Quoting ipswich78 :"""Other users note though that dimmable LEDs will NOT run on a traditional dimming system.""" So do I have to buy a new LED compatible dimmer switch? Am new to LEDs and my Lidl multi-colour LED ( with remote) will only dim in steps and not very much at that, would these ones have diming similar to old incandescent bulbs, i.e. continuous ?



The issue will be driver related. You need to have the correct drivers powering the dimmable LEDs, many drivers available offering different types of dimming. You'd really need to speak to a professional about this unless you are proficient with electrics?

There's a very detailed article here: ledsmagazine.com/art…tml
Edited by: "ipswich78" 23rd Feb 2016

Good price

ipswich78

Actually americanv8 is correct. These are very low lumen and wouldn't … Actually americanv8 is correct. These are very low lumen and wouldn't give off a huge amount of light. If you have a very small kitchen they might suffice but if you want to have your kitchen properly illuminated you should be looking at something between 700 - 900 lumen per lamp.As a rough rule of thumb a traditional 60W light bulb gives off 'about' 800-850 lumens.OP - have some heat though as an introduction to LED these are a good find. Other users note though that dimmable LEDs will NOT run on a traditional dimming system.


50 watt gu10 lamps typically emit 400 lumens, many 5 Watt leds will give the same light. These are dimmable which generally emit less light than non dimmable though still in the same ballpark. 700-900 lumens is much brighter than the tungsten 50 watts most people would be replacing. These dimmable (daylight - I like clinical) 9 Watt gu10s emit 810 lumens...
cpc.farnell.com/pro…ies

I've just installed some dimmable LED's using this switch. Yes the switch does matter, they did not work on a regular dimmer switch.
Varilight Dimmer Switch

very good price, thanks op, heat added!

ipswich78

Actually americanv8 is correct. These are very low lumen and wouldn't … Actually americanv8 is correct. These are very low lumen and wouldn't give off a huge amount of light. If you have a very small kitchen they might suffice but if you want to have your kitchen properly illuminated you should be looking at something between 700 - 900 lumen per lamp.As a rough rule of thumb a traditional 60W light bulb gives off 'about' 800-850 lumens.OP - have some heat though as an introduction to LED these are a good find. Other users note though that dimmable LEDs will NOT run on a traditional dimming system.



What does the size of the room have to do with it? If the room is bigger don't you just have more of them? I don't think you are supposed to have 1 in the middle of the room?

Does it say what the beam angle is?
I'd prefer a wider angle 120 or so than the usual spotlight 60 degree.

ipswich78

Verbatim and Philips do some very nice LED GU10, if you want 'bright … Verbatim and Philips do some very nice LED GU10, if you want 'bright white' you're probably looking at either a 3000k or for a more white, clinical type light 4000k (this is often referred to as the Colour Temperature). I'd look at either the Verbatim LED VxRadiator or the Philips MASTER LEDspot MV Value Dimtone GU10.



Thanks for the info, very helpful

I can confirm these spots are great, I bought 5 for £15 a while back. They replaced 40w halogens in my kitchen and the light output is equal brightness and colour temp. The dimmng works well, no flicker unless it's at the absolute lowest setting. No comparison to bargain shop LED lights, they aren't worth the saving.

Burty

What does the size of the room have to do with it? If the room is bigger … What does the size of the room have to do with it? If the room is bigger don't you just have more of them? I don't think you are supposed to have 1 in the middle of the room?


Absolutely. Comment makes no sense if you don't take account if how many of these per unit area.

Burty

What does the size of the room have to do with it? If the room is bigger … What does the size of the room have to do with it? If the room is bigger don't you just have more of them? I don't think you are supposed to have 1 in the middle of the room?


You're right you should have more of them. However the light / room size ratio isn't always the same. Four spots in a small kitchen would light a room better than say six spots in a room twice the size.

ipswich78

Verbatim and Philips do some very nice LED GU10, if you want 'bright … Verbatim and Philips do some very nice LED GU10, if you want 'bright white' you're probably looking at either a 3000k or for a more white, clinical type light 4000k (this is often referred to as the Colour Temperature). I'd look at either the Verbatim LED VxRadiator or the Philips MASTER LEDspot MV Value Dimtone GU10.


3000K is a warm/yellow light; 4000K is a daylight/normal white; 6000K is a cool/bright white.

i quite like mine. the problem with gu10s is they blow often the leds dont.

the only thing you will notice when you go to a restaurant with old gu10s is the heat they give off

Same price in Wickes,well 10p cheaper but they only have warm white
Your text here

pibpob

Absolutely. Comment makes no sense if you don't take account if how many … Absolutely. Comment makes no sense if you don't take account if how many of these per unit area.



Exactly .
"you should be looking at something between 700 - 900 lumen per lamp." - this depends entirely on how many/how big etc. etc.

Bear Bargains

Same price in Wickes,well 10p cheaper but they only have warm whiteYour … Same price in Wickes,well 10p cheaper but they only have warm whiteYour text here


Erm no.

"This lamp is non-dimmable"

pibpob

Erm no."This lamp is non-dimmable"


My bad, absolutely you're right.I bought the one's from wickes last week and for anyone who doesn't need dimmable it's a good option.

ipswich78

Actually americanv8 is correct. These are very low lumen and wouldn't … Actually americanv8 is correct. These are very low lumen and wouldn't give off a huge amount of light. If you have a very small kitchen they might suffice but if you want to have your kitchen properly illuminated you should be looking at something between 700 - 900 lumen per lamp.As a rough rule of thumb a traditional 60W light bulb gives off 'about' 800-850 lumens.OP - have some heat though as an introduction to LED these are a good find. Other users note though that dimmable LEDs will NOT run on a traditional dimming system.



The last sentence may be a little misleading: some LEDs will dim properly with a normal (leading edge) switch, but on the whole a trailing edge dimmer is likely to work better because they have a lower minimum load (generally <10W). So, the only part of the dimming system that needs to be changed is the dimmer switch, for a trailing edge one. This is a bit more expensive (but not much: perhaps £15 instead of £10), but has exactly the same electrical and mechanical fittings, and so is a one for one replacement. Changing a switch for a like for like replacement is not notifiable work, and so is not expensive (any competent person can do it).

Heat added: good find.

Edited by: "othen" 23rd Feb 2016

I've bought these a few weeks ago and nearly returned them as they're too bright for the living room and don't dim enough. Compared to the halogen ones they replaced they really don't feel warm at all and I ended up only fitting 2 instead of 4 on each side of the room. I'm gonna use the rest in the kitchen as they're just as bright as the halogens I have there now.

They're ok considering the price, but one of them was noisy when dimmed.

BenLoco

I've bought these a few weeks ago and nearly returned them as they're too … I've bought these a few weeks ago and nearly returned them as they're too bright for the living room and don't dim enough. Compared to the halogen ones they replaced they really don't feel warm at all and I ended up only fitting 2 instead of 4 on each side of the room. I'm gonna use the rest in the kitchen as they're just as bright as the halogens I have there now.They're ok considering the price, but one of them was noisy when dimmed.


See my note above. I suspect you still have a leading edge dimmer switch, so the minimum power output might be something like 20W, hence little dimming effect. If you change the dimmer switch to a trailing edge one the bulbs will probably dim throughout a good range.

Here is an example of a trailing edge dimmer switch, I have used this in a few applications (I'm qualified as an electrician) with good success:

screwfix.com/p/v…816
Edited by: "othen" 23rd Feb 2016

othen

The last sentence may be a little misleading: some LEDs will dim properly … The last sentence may be a little misleading: some LEDs will dim properly with a normal (leading edge) switch, but on the whole a trailing edge dimmer is likely to work better because they have a lower minimum load (generally <10W). So, the only part of the dimming system that needs to be changed is the dimmer switch, for a trailing edge one. This is a bit more expensive (but not much: perhaps £15 instead of £10), but has exactly the same electrical and mechanical fittings, and so is a one for one replacement. Changing a switch for a like for like replacement is not notifiable work, and so is not expensive (any competent person can do it).Heat added: good find.


Thanks for correcting me, I was getting a bit out of my depth with the technical elements.

I'd avoid any LED bulbs that aren't at least 400lms and between 4000k-4500k (which is the colour range that is actually something like "daylight"). Anything lower is always too yellow and anyhting higher too blue. It's usually 350(ish)lms 3000k bulbs that you'll find on offer and in bargain stores, and it's for a good reason.
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