ASDA Recycling Bins BACK IN STOCK! 6.97 for 25L 9.47 for 50L
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ASDA Recycling Bins BACK IN STOCK! 6.97 for 25L 9.47 for 50L

37
Found 26th Sep 2013
6.97 for 25 litre bins or 9.47 for 50 litre bins

37 Comments

Original Poster

I couldn't order any as my girlfriend will tell me off

Seems a decent price, but not sure that many would really need/want them. Surely most councils provide these free of charge anyway? We've got bins for general rubbish, another for grass/small branches and leaves, one for glass, cans and plastics, another for paper and cardboard. Yet more, inside the kitchen, a small bin for food recycling with free bags for the inside, and they then go outside to a larger food container in the garden. How many more would we need?

Meant to post this yesterday, ordered two of the big ones at £9.97 and two of the little ones. They're ideal for work places

I ordered 3 of these a few weeks ago from Asda and the large one was cancelled from my order with no explanation. The smaller ones I received are good quality, though, and their slim profile makes them ideal for slipping in narrow spaces for indoor sorting of recycling.

Recycling, Stopped taking it seriously a long time ago, They always say that you should tackle any problems at the source, So maybe the Government should do something about all the packets, Within a packet, Within a packet, Rather than getting me to do there work for them.

Banned

babylon

Recycling, Stopped taking it seriously a long time ago, They always say … Recycling, Stopped taking it seriously a long time ago, They always say that you should tackle any problems at the source, So maybe the Government should do something about all the packets, Within a packet, Within a packet, Rather than getting me to do there work for them.


I received my recycling bin yesterday. It contained those polystyrene flumps and was surrounded by bubble wrap and within a cardboard box:p

babylon

Recycling, Stopped taking it seriously a long time ago, They always say … Recycling, Stopped taking it seriously a long time ago, They always say that you should tackle any problems at the source, So maybe the Government should do something about all the packets, Within a packet, Within a packet, Rather than getting me to do there work for them.



I totally agree with you. I also believe though councils should offer incentives to people who recycle rather than trying to fine people who don't.

Does it matter who sorts it as long as it gets done, nice and tidy, into back of bin cart, all broke down to be recyled.

What's all the fuss?

Then it all goes up in smoke for days as the factory burns down, how many in last months?

trebor

I totally agree with you. I also believe though councils should offer … I totally agree with you. I also believe though councils should offer incentives to people who recycle rather than trying to fine people who don't.



Goverments aren't always as dumb as they seem. If less packaging was needed then it would naturally follow that there would need to be less people employed in producing that packaging. This would drive unemployment higher. It's a double-edged sword!

zerocrop

Goverments aren't always as dumb as they seem. If less packaging was … Goverments aren't always as dumb as they seem. If less packaging was needed then it would naturally follow that there would need to be less people employed in producing that packaging. This would drive unemployment higher. It's a double-edged sword!



How labour-intensive do you think making cellophane and polystyrene is....?

MyBoozyHell

How labour-intensive do you think making cellophane and polystyrene … How labour-intensive do you think making cellophane and polystyrene is....?



Clearly it requires people. As well as the manufacturing of it, you might also give consideration for those employed in transporting it from a to b, and for the accounting side of producing it etc. More people are involved than you had perhaps first considered I feel?

zerocrop

Clearly it requires people. As well as the manufacturing of it, you might … Clearly it requires people. As well as the manufacturing of it, you might also give consideration for those employed in transporting it from a to b, and for the accounting side of producing it etc. More people are involved than you had perhaps first considered I feel?



No, no...
I was merely looking for some sort of quantification.
My point still is that I don't see this being one of the most labour-intensive industries in the UK - so much so that I'm sure the government wouldn't give two hoots about how many people would be made unemployed if they chose to run a campaign to reduce product packaging.
Here's a thought....
If you're concerned about all the people that would be unemployed by this, think about the hoards that will be joining (and already have in Wales) the dole queue when the plastic bag charge kicks in next year!
Scary.....
Mind you, maybe the 5p levy covers the shortfall in the welfare budget to make it worthwhile.....

So what you’re saying is that the cellophane industry needs more transparency.

Well we could keep blaming each other and then don't do anything. Because of course that works !

u0421793

So what you’re saying is that the cellophane industry needs more t … So what you’re saying is that the cellophane industry needs more transparency.



This comment is wonderful!

u0421793

So what you’re saying is that the cellophane industry needs more t … So what you’re saying is that the cellophane industry needs more transparency.



That post about wraps it up....

It's a watertight argument.

These are great, got three of the smaller bins and they fit perfectly into the space of a washing machine

lowrieh1

Seems a decent price, but not sure that many would really need/want them. … Seems a decent price, but not sure that many would really need/want them. Surely most councils provide these free of charge anyway? We've got bins for general rubbish, another for grass/small branches and leaves, one for glass, cans and plastics, another for paper and cardboard. Yet more, inside the kitchen, a small bin for food recycling with free bags for the inside, and they then go outside to a larger food container in the garden. How many more would we need?



Pembrokeshire County Council only supply a small food waste bin - and some lucky households also got a glass box (many did not) apart from that they provide orange bags for recycle items but no bins for any of the larger amounts of waste (general/recycling) Ironically our only Asda in the county is so small that like many other offers - we wont see these in stock.)

I guess

warweezil

Pembrokeshire County Council only supply a small food waste bin - and … Pembrokeshire County Council only supply a small food waste bin - and some lucky households also got a glass box (many did not) apart from that they provide orange bags for recycle items but no bins for any of the larger amounts of waste (general/recycling) Ironically our only Asda in the county is so small that like many other offers - we wont see these in stock.)



I guess we've never had it so good then, at least in parts of Scotland (not 100% certain all authorities are the same), but we get recycling bins coming out our ears for this that and the next; lots of older folk can't cope and shout "enough"!. We also get the flu jab free if needed (always scratching my head at those posts going hot for someone charging them £7, £8, £9, etc. On top of the free prescriptions, we really are doing OK. Bottom line, good find by the OP on this then, and I also hope it helps those that can make good use of them.

Welcome to 2013, where people sift through their own filth because somebody told them to.

We were given hard plastic boxes a couple of years ago to re-cycle. Then they swapped them for wheelie bins. I asked what do we do with the large green boxes "dunno- keep 'em" was the answer !
I (everyone near me) now have 4 large wheelie bins out the front for various items. Made with hard plastic and rubber wheels, two hard green plastic boxes outside my back door and two smaller hard green boxes inside the house for general waste and food waste !
How much fossils fuels / energy was used to produce and diver these ? What happens when these are past their "lifespan"?
I live in a small cul de sac with 43 houses - that's 172 wheelie bins , 80 large plastic bins and 80 small bins ! I visited Vegas some years ago - trillions of lights on 24/7, air con on full belt and waste like you have never seen - and we're "encouraged" to switch to led lights and turn heating down 1 degree !

Mr No

Welcome to 2013, where people sift through their own filth because … Welcome to 2013, where people sift through their own filth because somebody told them to.



or alternatively we could burn up our planet's limited resources and hope that our great grand-kids have gills in their necks to filter out the pollution in our screwed up planet.

Or maybe you could get off your sofa-stuck ass and actually give a crap.

jasgrat

or alternatively we could burn up our planet's limited resources and hope … or alternatively we could burn up our planet's limited resources and hope that our great grand-kids have gills in their necks to filter out the pollution in our screwed up planet. Or maybe you could get off your sofa-stuck ass and actually give a crap.



Totally agree. If you can't even be bothered to recycle your own things how can you expect someone else to? The thing is it takes seconds, like literally a minuscule amount of time. Especially in areas where all the recycling is bundled together. I always hate that people are too lazy to even try to recycle.

jasgrat

or alternatively we could burn up our planet's limited resources and hope … or alternatively we could burn up our planet's limited resources and hope that our great grand-kids have gills in their necks to filter out the pollution in our screwed up planet. Or maybe you could get off your sofa-stuck ass and actually give a crap.



Do you honestly believe that by putting your dirty plastic wrappers in a special box you're saving the environment? You should follow its path to see where it ends up. Could I interest you in a left handed screwdriver or some stripey paint once you've finished digging through garbage?

Grandchildren? Procreating on an overcrowded planet, now there is a huge cause of concern for the environment.

drnkbeer

[quote=jasgrat] Totally agree. If you can't even be bothered to recycle … [quote=jasgrat] Totally agree. If you can't even be bothered to recycle your own things how can you expect someone else to? The thing is it takes seconds, like literally a minuscule amount of time. Especially in areas where all the recycling is bundled together. I always hate that people are too lazy to even try to recycle.



The time is not an issue, the multitude of bags, bins, containers together with the hygiene issues are. If somebody wants to spend their time dividing left over food, dirty plastic wrappers and cans only for it all to be buried in landfill, that's up to them. I'll always see it as a past time for the homeless.

Mr No

[quote=jasgrat] Grandchildren? Procreating on an overcrowded planet, now … [quote=jasgrat] Grandchildren? Procreating on an overcrowded planet, now there is a huge cause of concern for the environment.



yep.. we agree on something.. you should never have children

Mr No

Do you honestly believe that by putting your dirty plastic wrappers in a … Do you honestly believe that by putting your dirty plastic wrappers in a special box you're saving the environment? You should follow its path to see where it ends up. Could I interest you in a left handed screwdriver or some stripey paint once you've finished digging through garbage?Grandchildren? Procreating on an overcrowded planet, now there is a huge cause of concern for the environment.



Last year, Americans recycled 61 billion aluminum cans, saving the energy equivalent of 17 million barrels of crude oil. That’s a whole lot of recovered resources!

So, how was all that energy saved? To put it simply, manufacturing cans from recycled aluminum consumes 95 percent less energy than using virgin materials.

To put those figures in perspective, recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to keep a 100-watt bulb burning for almost four hours or run your television for three hours.

earth911.com/new…ng/

Also recycled waste costs £100 a tonne to collect and process whereas landfill rubbish costs £130 a tonne. Recycling saves money which can be put back into schools, hospitals etc and recycling also employs 40,000 people in the UK

recyclenow.com/wha…tml

but i'm sure your left handed screwdriver is a better argument.

jasgrat

yep.. we agree on something.. you should never have children



You should spend less time digging through your own waste and focus on those errant full stops.

jasgrat

Last year, Americans recycled 61 billion aluminum cans, saving the energy … Last year, Americans recycled 61 billion aluminum cans, saving the energy equivalent of 17 million barrels of crude oil. That’s a whole lot of recovered resources!



That's almost enough to replace the resources wasted on the 120 billion new "recycling" bins, bags, trucks, staff and processing plants.

Mr No

That's almost enough to replace the resources wasted on the 120 billion … That's almost enough to replace the resources wasted on the 120 billion new "recycling" bins, bags, trucks, staff and processing plants.



I think your village is looking for you.

jasgrat

I think your village is looking for you.



To assist in the world changing act of separating their yoghurt pots from their Bacardi bottles?

I wasn't all that boshed about recycling. Then our council brought in, to some outcry, fortnightly collections alternating between rubbish and recycling, providing us with an extra bin for card/paper/plastic/metal and a box for glass.

It has been going now for a year or two and in actual fact it works very easily and simply and I'm glad they've done it.

We just have two bins in the house, one for normal rubbish, one for recyclable materials, and take the glass jars out as and when we empty them.


Anyway, bought a few of these bins for dried dog and rabbit food. Nice and slimline.

I would never pay for recycling bins

These should be the free ones from the council, instead of that we get silly purple polyurethane sacks!

Council tax goes up though every year!

I went to my local recycling village with a large cardboard box full of plastic bottles. Asked where I could put them. Council worker said there was no provision for cardboard and plastic just glass and car batteries and that my council (south Tyneside) don't much care. Went on to say just toss them in household skip which I did. Haven't taken the time to recycle much at home since. If council don't much care why should i

Last year, Americans recycled 61 billion aluminum cans, saving the energy … Last year, Americans recycled 61 billion aluminum cans, saving the energy equivalent of 17 million barrels of crude oil. That’s a whole lot of recovered resources!So, how was all that energy saved? To put it simply, manufacturing cans from recycled aluminum consumes 95 percent less energy than using virgin materials.To put those figures in perspective, recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to keep a 100-watt bulb burning for almost four hours or run your television for three hours.http://earth911.com/news/2012/10/17/how-much-energy-water-saved-by-recycling/Also recycled waste costs £100 a tonne to collect and process whereas landfill rubbish costs £130 a tonne. Recycling saves money which can be put back into schools, hospitals etc and recycling also employs 40,000 people in the UKhttp://www.recyclenow.com/what_can_i_do_today/recycle_week_2013.htmlbut i'm sure your left handed screwdriver is a better argument.



A bit ironic that, You using the second highest polluting country on the planet as an example of how it should be done.

You see the problem I have with all this, Is that I pay through the nose in taxes for all this stuff, I pay a fortune for fuel, I can't throw anything away without someone wanting me to shift through it first, I'm not even allowed to throw away a perfectly legal and commercially available product at my local tip called PlasterBoard, So it gets hid at the bottom of the wheelie bin, I do all of this in the name of saving the environment and robbing me blind.
But all the time I am doing this and having my my paypacket robbed on a weekly bases, American and Chinese citizens are living the life of riley, And pumping out over 20 times what we do every year, America has 6 times the people and produces over 10 times the pollution, I'm all game for saving the human race(Planet will be here long after were gone), But I'm sick and tired of being expected to do it on my BL**DY own.

Edited by: "babylon" 19th Oct 2013

We use these as ordinary waste bins, we have a large one in the kitchen and the smaller one in the bathroom. They are very durable and unlike ordinary bins, do not have flimsy 'hinge' bits that always break. We also used them to store chicken feed when we had chooks. They are less than £1 more from Amazon (marketplace sellers) delivered - which is better for us as we were some distance from the nearest Asda, until a new one opened a bit closer to us last week.
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