Autism friendly showing of Night At the Museum - Secret of the Tomb @ Cineworld
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Autism friendly showing of Night At the Museum - Secret of the Tomb @ Cineworld

186
Found 15th Dec 2014
Hey people, this is a good Sunday morning for autistic kids and adults on the 4th January 2015.

Wasn't sure what folder to put this in but here it is.

Specs and prices are as follows.

Autism Friendly screenings at Cineworld differ from regular screenings. Some of the key differences are:
Lighting will be kept on during the screening.
Volume levels will be reduced.
There will be no advertisements or trailers.
Seating will not be allocated.
Customers will be allowed to bring in their own food.
Screenings will be at 11am on the first Sunday of every month.

Type MyCineworld Regular Price
Adult
£8.78 £9.70 £0.00
Child
£6.35 £7.00 £0.00
Senior
£6.35 £7.00 £0.00
Student
£6.62 £7.30 £0.00
Family
2 adults & 2 children or 1 adult & 3 children
£27.56 £30.40 £0.00

Check your local Cineworld for more Autism friendly showings.

186 Comments

Fabulous idea - I saw toys r us had done a similar event so autistic children could enjoy a shopping trip with family members. More places should get on board. Heat added

Original Poster

Totally agree with you there. Thanks for the heat.

Your very welcome it's a lovely post

Original Poster

Fab idea, definitely deserves heat

This is an amazing idea! Glad to see them doing something like this

"There will be no advertisements or trailers."
I'm not autistic, but I'll be all over this.

Original Poster

It's high time restaurants and other public places do this.

we go to the ones at vue cinema, really is nice to be able to enjoy a film as a family and not worry about other people

Original Poster

Shouldn't have to worry about what people think or how they react. It's pure ignorance.

Awesome post. heat added !

Why can't they do this for all kids? Everything they've mentioned would make for a much better time!

angelhaseyes

Shouldn't have to worry about what people think or how they react. It's … Shouldn't have to worry about what people think or how they react. It's pure ignorance.



Whilst I certainly agree with the first part of your comment, I'm not so sure I agree with classing people as ignorant just because they don't fit in with your views on behavior or attitudes - it's a bit like politicians who state that ''all decent right minded people think/do/say x y z '' to try and silence or belittle opposing views.
I've been in shops where a child/teenager with some form of mental health issue was poking, prodding and dismantling parts of the display, with the mother saying 'don't do that please' then turning away and letting him continue.
There are rights and wrongs on all sides, and I would hope that people would treat someone who had autism with tolerance, but equally the parents of the children have to take responsibility for ensuring their child's behavior doesn't get too extreme and unreasonable (not easy to define 'reasonable' I know) to the point of spoiling someone's pleasure or wrecking their shop.

greentrident

Why can't they do this for all kids? Everything they've mentioned would … Why can't they do this for all kids? Everything they've mentioned would make for a much better time!



I know the screenings at vue allow anybody to join in, not just people with autism, lots of people with kids usually go as it's a lot less stressful

nice

Original Poster

kamenitzabrit

Whilst I certainly agree with the first part of your comment, I'm not so … Whilst I certainly agree with the first part of your comment, I'm not so sure I agree with classing people as ignorant just because they don't fit in with your views on behavior or attitudes - it's a bit like politicians who state that ''all decent right minded people think/do/say x y z '' to try and silence or belittle opposing views. I've been in shops where a child/teenager with some form of mental health issue was poking, prodding and dismantling parts of the display, with the mother saying 'don't do that please' then turning away and letting him continue. There are rights and wrongs on all sides, and I would hope that people would treat someone who had autism with tolerance, but equally the parents of the children have to take responsibility for ensuring their child's behavior doesn't get too extreme and unreasonable (not easy to define 'reasonable' I know) to the point of spoiling someone's pleasure or wrecking their shop.



Totally agree with all what you've said. As a parent with a kid on the spectrum I still had rules. It's not always easy to control tough and as far as tantrums or 'different' behaviour I used to say, he's autistic and left it that. That's the way I was meaning it with the ignorance... Not enough is out there explaining their ways. Having said that it's hard to understand and deal with at times. As I said, I had rules but some parents don't and it's hard to know what line to take and when. Again, I agree with what you stated.

kamenitzabrit

Whilst I certainly agree with the first part of your comment, I'm not so … Whilst I certainly agree with the first part of your comment, I'm not so sure I agree with classing people as ignorant just because they don't fit in with your views on behavior or attitudes - it's a bit like politicians who state that ''all decent right minded people think/do/say x y z '' to try and silence or belittle opposing views. I've been in shops where a child/teenager with some form of mental health issue was poking, prodding and dismantling parts of the display, with the mother saying 'don't do that please' then turning away and letting him continue. There are rights and wrongs on all sides, and I would hope that people would treat someone who had autism with tolerance, but equally the parents of the children have to take responsibility for ensuring their child's behavior doesn't get too extreme and unreasonable (not easy to define 'reasonable' I know) to the point of spoiling someone's pleasure or wrecking their shop.



Have you ever tried stopping a melt down, trust me it isn't happening no matter what you say or do! (a meltdown is completely different from a tantrum, usually triggered by a sensory overload or frustration at being unable to communicate effectively) i'm afraid it goes beyond simple discipline, theres nothing resonable about a meltdown lol
But i do agree that some people do use it as an escuse for everything and just like any other kid you know when your child is just being badly behaved so should deal with it

Original Poster

simoneroebuck

Have you ever tried stopping a melt down, trust me it isn't happening no … Have you ever tried stopping a melt down, trust me it isn't happening no matter what you say or do! (a meltdown is completely different from a tantrum, usually triggered by a sensory overload or frustration at being unable to communicate effectively) i'm afraid it goes beyond simple discipline, theres nothing resonable about a meltdown lol



Very true, rules can be implemented but a major meltdown is just something they have to get off their chests so to speak. It's heartbreaking watching a loved one having one and knowing there's nothing you can do. I've had many times where I've had to wait for long periods of time while my son was aligning tins in an aisle and no matter what, it had to be finished. sometimes with meltdowns the old adage of "patience is a virtue" really helps. Even now, some teachers and education staff still aren't clued up about how to deal with and manage it.

greentrident

Why can't they do this for all kids? Everything they've mentioned would … Why can't they do this for all kids? Everything they've mentioned would make for a much better time!



there is no restrictions to who can go, so take your kids along too, when i take my boyts to these there are all sort sof disabled kids and a load on non disabled too, kids all get a long no matter what.

Original Poster

haritori

[quote=greentrident] Why can't they do this for all kids? Everything … [quote=greentrident] Why can't they do this for all kids? Everything they've mentioned would make for a much better time!



there is no restrictions to who can go, so take your kids along too, when i take my boyts to these there are all sort sof disabled kids and a load on non disabled too, kids all get a long no matter what.[/quote

Sometimes.

Original Poster

simoneroebuck

list of all cinemas who do … list of all cinemas who do ithttp://www.dimensions-uk.org/support-services/autism-care/autism-friendly-screenings/



I'm posting that link to FB. Great help.

simoneroebuck

Have you ever tried stopping a melt down, trust me it isn't happening no … Have you ever tried stopping a melt down, trust me it isn't happening no matter what you say or do! (a meltdown is completely different from a tantrum, usually triggered by a sensory overload or frustration at being unable to communicate effectively) i'm afraid it goes beyond simple discipline, theres nothing resonable about a meltdown lol :)But i do agree that some people do use it as an escuse for everything and just like any other kid you know when your child is just being badly behaved so should deal with it



No one will understand this unless you have been through it, its the worst ordeal i can imagine and i go to massive legnths to avoid them!

all the looks and comments from passersby of how we must be horrible parents with terrible kids the irony is only the most patient, loving and caring parents can deal with it.

hotukdeals.com/mis…e=3

an interesting read on a thread is started a while back, just to show the horrors of what i have been through, and read the comments, some people still are horrid.

Original Poster

haritori

No one will understand this unless you have been through it, its the … No one will understand this unless you have been through it, its the worst ordeal i can imagine and i go to massive legnths to avoid them!all the looks and comments from passersby of how we must be horrible parents with terrible kids the irony is only the most patient, loving and caring parents can deal with it.http://www.hotukdeals.com/misc/do-disabled-annoy-1993949?page=3 an interesting read on a thread is started a while back, just to show the horrors of what i have been through, and read the comments, some people still are horrid.



Vile.

We like these, my son has a hearing aid and the ultra-loud movies usually mean it distorts and he can't hear what was said, it's really hard to repeat whole scenes while everyone around us glares at us. It wasn't so bad when he was little and didn't much care if he missed something but now he really wants to follow the whole plot.

angelhaseyes

Vile.



??

haritori

No one will understand this unless you have been through it, its the … No one will understand this unless you have been through it, its the worst ordeal i can imagine and i go to massive legnths to avoid them!all the looks and comments from passersby of how we must be horrible parents with terrible kids the irony is only the most patient, loving and caring parents can deal with it.http://www.hotukdeals.com/misc/do-disabled-annoy-1993949?page=3 an interesting read on a thread is started a while back, just to show the horrors of what i have been through, and read the comments, some people still are horrid.



Yeah we have been through this MANY times with our Autistic child who also has ADHD - One in the summer was on the grass outside houses of parliament in London when we were on holiday. The amount of people stopping and starting and asking what was going on was amazing. Luckily one of the guards knew about Autism and was brilliant.

But this Autism friendly theater trip is brilliant and deserves heat

Original Poster

haritori

??



Vile people I meant. Hard to comprehend that nastiness comes forth.

angelhaseyes

Vile people I meant. Hard to comprehend that nastiness comes forth.



I know, it beggars belief, luckily those type of people aren't at these screenings, massive heat

Original Poster

haritori

I know, it beggars belief, luckily those type of people aren't at these … I know, it beggars belief, luckily those type of people aren't at these screenings, massive heat



Definitely. BTW. I always take my own food and drink (_;)

Great that they are doung this, heat

Nice idea!

Thanks for the post, I'm sure like me many just didn't know about this and would really benefit from the post

Brill, thanks for posting.

I understand the light levels and volume but what does the ability to bring your own snacks / refreshments have to do with autism? (_;)
Heck smuggling food into cinemas is an art form.

haritori

No one will understand this unless you have been through it, its the … No one will understand this unless you have been through it, its the worst ordeal i can imagine and i go to massive legnths to avoid them!all the looks and comments from passersby of how we must be horrible parents with terrible kids the irony is only the most patient, loving and caring parents can deal with it.http://www.hotukdeals.com/misc/do-disabled-annoy-1993949?page=3 an interesting read on a thread is started a while back, just to show the horrors of what i have been through, and read the comments, some people still are horrid.



Sadly it's human nature to shun / distrust those who are different..
It's an evolutionary response that has been advantageous to the continued survival of our species. One of many aspects of humanity which aren't suited to life in modern society.

Education helps prevent those behaviours and curb the comments / actions by teaching people that such behaviour isn't acceptable.. But we're only human.. Acceptance and tolerance is required on both sides no matter how unjust it may feel.

Original Poster

Taking your own refreshments and food is vital at times for autistics. Many need to see food presented in a particular way and drinks too. Many only prefer certain containers and separation and colour coding. This can throw autistics into panic before even going in.

angelhaseyes

Taking your own refreshments and food is vital at times for autistics. … Taking your own refreshments and food is vital at times for autistics. Many need to see food presented in a particular way and drinks too. Many only prefer certain containers and separation and colour coding. This can throw autistics into panic before even going in.



I remember when i worked at a home for folks with learning difficulties, we couldn't get Paul to the cinema or anywhere in the evening, because he knew there wouldn't be a sandwich at 5pm, and that meant the world would end for him. Just as being reassured in March that Christmas still existed and would get here eventually, was essential information at 2am.

Yep showcase also do this once a month.
No ads or trailers and the lights on low during the show with sound turned down slightly also.
They also do subtitled showings on Sundays and Tuesdays for the hard of hearing.

I took my kids (not autistic) to a showing like this and honestly, there isn't much difference. You don't get all the daft adverts so the film starts straight away, the lights aren't all the way down so children can get up freely and walk around if they please, it's also not as loud which even my kids don't like too much.

Vue does it every month too.

Awesome idea and I think cineworld should be applauded for this idea.

Just a shame there's none near me
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