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Autism: I Think I Might be Autistic: A Guide to Spotting the Signs and Symptoms and Living with Autism 2nd - Kindle Edition Free at Amazon
Posted 16th Aug

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**Do You Worry You May Be Autistic?**

It can be a daunting and worrying prospect to consider the possibility and more and more cases and being missed in children and diagnosing in adults. This book is designed to help you learn about the signs and symptoms of autism and how to spot them and give you practical solutions and exercises you can do at home to try and alleviate the symptoms associated with the condition, as well as information regarding more traditional treatments that your doctor may subscribe so you know what to expect.

This book is the culmination of over five years research working with and improving the lives of autistic adults and children.

Whether you are reading this book for yourself, or you're worried about a child or loved one, it will give you an insight and a new found understanding into the condition and how best to cope with it.

What You Will Learn in This Book:

  • What is Autism
  • What are the differences between Autism and Asperger's
  • What are the symptoms in Children and Adults
  • What should I do if I think I have Autism
  • What help or treatment is available
  • Techniques you can do at home to alleviate symptoms
  • Stress Management
  • Trigger Management
  • Much, Much More!

**Download This Book Today! New Extended 2nd Edition!**
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Top comments
As a parent of an autistic child, I'd strongly recommend against diagnosing oneself or anyone else based on symptoms, signs etc... If you feel you or your loved one might have special needs, goto a professional.
Codelas16/08/2020 15:36

Comment deleted


The idea that ASD is just about getting "a label" is absolutely ridiculous. Mental health is arguably more complicated than physical health and if anything, we need more attention towards it and more care, not this blaise attitude towards it. It isn't about getting a label, it is about getting an answer as to why you are struggling and more importantly getting access (in theory) to support which can better help you succeed in life.

"Those old days" were not very good because you could not talk about mental health and people with actual issues, such as those with ASD or depression or whatever, could not easily access the support they need. Thankfully "those old days" are over at least in terms of the fact we can talk more about it. Now we need improvement to NHS services but at least the discussion is being made.
Edited by: "zlain" 16th Aug
Codelas16/08/2020 15:36

Comment deleted


Was this back when kids struggling with learning were relegated to the corner of the classroom or demoted to the "slow" class? Where people with severe social challenges were mocked or at the very least dismissed as weird or dim witted? There've been "labels" as long as there's been language, we just use kinder and more factual terms to help us understand people's gifts and vulnerabilities. To find it irritating is to admit a lack of empathy.

As for diagnoses, the brain is still being studied and understood. Surely having professionals help people identify their strengths and weaknesses and seek adequate support is a good thing? Or do you think this is all an attention seeking fad, and people should just "snap out of it"?
Comments aside, is it worthwhile considering whether the book is actually any good? I read the first few pages and it's already very much out of date. I work as a clinical psychologist with autistic children and have done for over 15 years and my advice would be to steer clear of these books and instead look at the wealth of information on sites like the national autistic society. That's free, has more relevant info and is from a respected organisation. Next, speak with your GP for local guidance and consider what may be a useful next step. Good luck to everyone out there who may be unsure if they are autistic. Oh and if you can, try to be kind.
86 Comments
God, I hate hyperboles.

They frustrate me so much.
Hopefully this is an autism friendly read.
As a parent of an autistic child, I'd strongly recommend against diagnosing oneself or anyone else based on symptoms, signs etc... If you feel you or your loved one might have special needs, goto a professional.
I got my diagnosis two years ago and still not sure how I feel about it.
Codelas16/08/2020 15:36

Comment deleted


Can't we just agree that we are all different?
jimel16/08/2020 15:24

As a parent of an autistic child, I'd strongly recommend against …As a parent of an autistic child, I'd strongly recommend against diagnosing oneself or anyone else based on symptoms, signs etc... If you feel you or your loved one might have special needs, goto a professional.


Absolutely, and in the vast majority of cases, if you think you are autistic, you're not... Another parent of an autistic child...
MadeDixonsCry16/08/2020 14:06

God, I hate hyperboles. They frustrate me so much.


I don't get this. Does this mean I may be autistic?
Codelas16/08/2020 15:36

Comment deleted


The idea that ASD is just about getting "a label" is absolutely ridiculous. Mental health is arguably more complicated than physical health and if anything, we need more attention towards it and more care, not this blaise attitude towards it. It isn't about getting a label, it is about getting an answer as to why you are struggling and more importantly getting access (in theory) to support which can better help you succeed in life.

"Those old days" were not very good because you could not talk about mental health and people with actual issues, such as those with ASD or depression or whatever, could not easily access the support they need. Thankfully "those old days" are over at least in terms of the fact we can talk more about it. Now we need improvement to NHS services but at least the discussion is being made.
Edited by: "zlain" 16th Aug
Staf60016/08/2020 16:18

I don't get this. Does this mean I may be autistic?


Unlikely, the general population don't "get" me either.
I’m probably on the spectrum, but I’m happy and successful and that’s all that really matters. I piss a lot of people off because I lack outward emotion, people skills and social graces, but whatever!
zlain16/08/2020 16:51

The idea that ASD is just about getting "a label" is absolutely …The idea that ASD is just about getting "a label" is absolutely ridiculous. Mental health is arguably more complicated than physical health and if anything, we need more attention towards it and more care, not this blaise attitude towards it. It isn't about getting a label, it is about getting an answer as to why you are struggling and more importantly getting access (in theory) to support which can better help you succeed in life."Those old days" were not very good because you could not talk about mental health and people with actual issues, such as those with ASD or depression or whatever, could not easily access the support they need. Thankfully "those old days" are over at least in terms of the fact we can talk more about it. Now we need improvement to NHS services but at least the discussion is being made.


Very well said.
electrogear16/08/2020 17:12

I’m probably on the spectrum, but I’m happy and successful and that’s all t …I’m probably on the spectrum, but I’m happy and successful and that’s all that really matters. I piss a lot of people off because I lack outward emotion, people skills and social graces, but whatever!


How many comments on HUKD have you had deleted?
I’m autistic and the cover puts me off reading it. A lot of the autistic community hate the puzzle piece

Also it’s not symptoms! It’s not like you can catch it! It’s not the common cold. I think ur looking for the term characteristics... it’s something we are born with, it’s a neurological condition!

Iv actually delivered training to health professionals about autism from a lived experience...
Edited by: "CherylMareeFerris-stewart" 16th Aug
caffeinekid16/08/2020 15:49

I got my diagnosis two years ago and still not sure how I feel about it.


It’s ok , I was dignosed 3 years ago, Iv never been happier I have reasonable ajustments at work now
Edited by: "CherylMareeFerris-stewart" 16th Aug
MadeDixonsCry16/08/2020 14:06

God, I hate hyperboles. They frustrate me so much.


Where is the hyperbole in this post?
Wooj16/08/2020 17:41

Where is the hyperbole in this post?


Where is the claim that such exists in my comment?
Codelas16/08/2020 15:36

Comment deleted


Was this back when kids struggling with learning were relegated to the corner of the classroom or demoted to the "slow" class? Where people with severe social challenges were mocked or at the very least dismissed as weird or dim witted? There've been "labels" as long as there's been language, we just use kinder and more factual terms to help us understand people's gifts and vulnerabilities. To find it irritating is to admit a lack of empathy.

As for diagnoses, the brain is still being studied and understood. Surely having professionals help people identify their strengths and weaknesses and seek adequate support is a good thing? Or do you think this is all an attention seeking fad, and people should just "snap out of it"?
zlain16/08/2020 16:51

The idea that ASD is just about getting "a label" is absolutely …The idea that ASD is just about getting "a label" is absolutely ridiculous. Mental health is arguably more complicated than physical health and if anything, we need more attention towards it and more care, not this blaise attitude towards it. It isn't about getting a label, it is about getting an answer as to why you are struggling and more importantly getting access (in theory) to support which can better help you succeed in life."Those old days" were not very good because you could not talk about mental health and people with actual issues, such as those with ASD or depression or whatever, could not easily access the support they need. Thankfully "those old days" are over at least in terms of the fact we can talk more about it. Now we need improvement to NHS services but at least the discussion is being made.


I wish I could easily access those services! The waiting to see somebody is ridiculous all the Dr's do is change your meds or increase the dosage. Half the time I'm wondering why I bothered to go see the doctor in the first place!
Codelas16/08/2020 15:36

Comment deleted


Nonsense. I remember the days when mentally ill people were thrown into straightjackets and given shock "therapy", or just plainly ignored. The progress we're making with mental health can only be a good thing - it's not about trying to be 'special' with labels, and diagnosis is very important. No clue who would have liked such an unhelpful comment, or why.
zlain16/08/2020 16:51

The idea that ASD is just about getting "a label" is absolutely …The idea that ASD is just about getting "a label" is absolutely ridiculous. Mental health is arguably more complicated than physical health and if anything, we need more attention towards it and more care, not this blaise attitude towards it. It isn't about getting a label, it is about getting an answer as to why you are struggling and more importantly getting access (in theory) to support which can better help you succeed in life."Those old days" were not very good because you could not talk about mental health and people with actual issues, such as those with ASD or depression or whatever, could not easily access the support they need. Thankfully "those old days" are over at least in terms of the fact we can talk more about it. Now we need improvement to NHS services but at least the discussion is being made.


He's not wrong and I think you've misinterpreted what he meant. I've grown up with the current generation and there are many people who label themselves as OCD or claim to have ADHD because they think it makes them quirky. Most people seem to self diagnose themselves or their children because they want to be felt sorry for or are uneducated on mental health issues.
CherylMareeFerris-stewart16/08/2020 17:36

I’m autistic and the cover puts me off reading it. A lot of the autistic c …I’m autistic and the cover puts me off reading it. A lot of the autistic community hate the puzzle pieceAlso it’s not symptoms! It’s not like you can catch it! It’s not the common cold. I think ur looking for the term characteristics... it’s something we are born with, it’s a neurological condition!Iv actually delivered training to health professionals about autism from a lived experience...


Definition: of symptom
/ˈsɪm(p)təm/
noun
plural noun: symptoms
a physical or mental feature which is regarded as indicating a condition of disease, particularly such a feature that is apparent to the patient.
It’s not a disease though, so what point are you even trying to make by quoting a dictionary? Time to step back and re-evaluate, matey.
There’s going to be a lot more people diagnosed with autism in the near future
A lot of pedantic comments in this thread, and a lot of "normal" people making comments based on assumptions that "normal" people make.

Perfect for the subject of the book in the OP

Carry on
Comments aside, is it worthwhile considering whether the book is actually any good? I read the first few pages and it's already very much out of date. I work as a clinical psychologist with autistic children and have done for over 15 years and my advice would be to steer clear of these books and instead look at the wealth of information on sites like the national autistic society. That's free, has more relevant info and is from a respected organisation. Next, speak with your GP for local guidance and consider what may be a useful next step. Good luck to everyone out there who may be unsure if they are autistic. Oh and if you can, try to be kind.
CherylMareeFerris-stewart16/08/2020 17:36

I’m autistic and the cover puts me off reading it. A lot of the autistic c …I’m autistic and the cover puts me off reading it. A lot of the autistic community hate the puzzle pieceAlso it’s not symptoms! It’s not like you can catch it! It’s not the common cold. I think ur looking for the term characteristics... it’s something we are born with, it’s a neurological condition!Iv actually delivered training to health professionals about autism from a lived experience...


Wowwww. Never heard that in several years working in ASD teams. Puzzle was in fact the sign for Autism for many, many tears, until it was changed in USA for the infinite loop and that was an specific event change.

The puzzle piece for Autism has a lot of symbolism. The puzzle represents the human race, and all pieces are different showing diversity, and most important yet is that every single piece fits, no matter how different the shape is vs the "standard" piece.

You can go further and see that all pieces not only fit, but are all needed. Some of the most incredible advances and discovers of the humanity were made by people with ASD. You should read the book of Temple Grandin or look her TED Talks (available free in youtube)
JJ6916/08/2020 16:04

Absolutely, and in the vast majority of cases, if you think you are …Absolutely, and in the vast majority of cases, if you think you are autistic, you're not... Another parent of an autistic child...


Speaking as someone diagnosed in adulthood, this is complete nonsense. How exactly do you think adults get diagnosed? They don't wonder around the streets & then magically get diagnosed by a passing psychiatrist. They need to suspect they might be autistic to request a referral to a diagnostic service. Some people find out they aren't, but many others find out they are.
rlaroca16/08/2020 20:12

Wowwww. Never heard that in several years working in ASD teams. Puzzle was …Wowwww. Never heard that in several years working in ASD teams. Puzzle was in fact the sign for Autism for many, many tears, until it was changed in USA for the infinite loop and that was an specific event change.The puzzle piece for Autism has a lot of symbolism. The puzzle represents the human race, and all pieces are different showing diversity, and most important yet is that every single piece fits, no matter how different the shape is vs the "standard" piece.You can go further and see that all pieces not only fit, but are all needed. Some of the most incredible advances and discovers of the humanity were made by people with ASD. You should read the book of Temple Grandin or look her TED Talks (available free in youtube)


The puzzle piece is highly problematic. It was first used by the National Autistic Society as they believed autistic people would always be a puzzle. It also illustrates the (incredibly wrong) belief that autistic people are forever childlike. In more modern times, it has been used by places such as Autism Speaks, who are an insidious "charity" that are awful to autistic people. It implies a piece of us is missing. You making up a story about the human race doesn't change the truth. If that were true, NT (neurotypical people,
as in non-autistics) would just as equally be represented by a puzzle piece too. They are not though.

Temple Grandin is also problematic. She is an autistic person who has internalised a great deal of ableism. She spouts out some awful stuff about autistics & seems to believe in aspie-supremacy.

This lack of knowledge on your part, including outright untruths, makes me think either you've never worked in any ASD teams, or you received atrociously incorrect training.
Codelas16/08/2020 15:36

Comment deleted


It might be a good idea to educate yourself before posting daft comments, you obviously don't even know what autism is, you probably think its just some people who to you seem a bit weird but can talk and get by in life just fine.
Many autistic people are non verbal and need 24 hour care and will never live anything like a normal life and their families go through hell on a daily basis.
Don't know how you think they are the same as everyone else and shouldn't be diagnosed and get the help they need ?
Erinath16/08/2020 20:29

The puzzle piece is highly problematic. It was first used by the National …The puzzle piece is highly problematic. It was first used by the National Autistic Society as they believed autistic people would always be a puzzle. It also illustrates the (incredibly wrong) belief that autistic people are forever childlike. In more modern times, it has been used by places such as Autism Speaks, who are an insidious "charity" that are awful to autistic people. It implies a piece of us is missing. You making up a story about the human race doesn't change the truth. If that were true, NT (neurotypical people, as in non-autistics) would just as equally be represented by a puzzle piece too. They are not though.Temple Grandin is also problematic. She is an autistic person who has internalised a great deal of ableism. She spouts out some awful stuff about autistics & seems to believe in aspie-supremacy.This lack of knowledge on your part, including outright untruths, makes me think either you've never worked in any ASD teams, or you received atrociously incorrect training.


Please don't tell me what I do or don't or what I know or not. The simple fact that you disagree with me don't give you: 1) The right to do so, and 2) The true. You have a point of view, valid to your eyes, and I suppose to many people. I respect that 100%. That don't make people with other point of view less or wrong and certainly don't give you the right to insinuate I'm lying.

The first statements said "A lot of the autistic community hate the puzzle piece". It maybe true, I obviously don't know all Autistic persons in the world, but in my experience over the years and knowing hundred of children and parents of Autistic childrens, I have never heard that. That is a fact whenever you like it or not. Maybe I have the statistic improbably of being with the smallest portion that like the puzzle piece, but I doubt it.

And in almost all ASD events, you can found items for sale for founding, specially puzzle related items. And guess what. They usually run out of of stock, and the events attendance if mostly ASD parents and professionals.

I feel this is like the controversy about "Autistic person" vs "Person with Autism". There are two points of view and no side is wrong, its just personal preferences.
Edited by: "rlaroca" 16th Aug
darrensutherland16/08/2020 18:45

He's not wrong and I think you've misinterpreted what he meant. I've grown …He's not wrong and I think you've misinterpreted what he meant. I've grown up with the current generation and there are many people who label themselves as OCD or claim to have ADHD because they think it makes them quirky. Most people seem to self diagnose themselves or their children because they want to be felt sorry for or are uneducated on mental health issues.


So what about people like my daughter who is non verbal needs 24 hour care, is extremely difficult to look after even with 2 of us at home when im off work and our life is hell every day, yet we dont go around shoving it in peoples face or expecting people to feel sorry for us, we just want the help we need to improve things.
So because you think you know some attention seeking people, others with much more difficulties shouldn't get their help and diagnosis ?
rlaroca16/08/2020 20:46

Please don't tell me what I do or don't or what I know or not. The simple …Please don't tell me what I do or don't or what I know or not. The simple fact that you disagree with me don't give you: 1) The right to do so, and 2) The true. You have a point of view, valid to your eyes, and I suppose to many people. I respect that 100%. That don't make people with other point of view less or wrong and certainly don't give you the right to insinuate I'm lying.The first statements said "A lot of the autistic community hate the puzzle piece". It maybe true, I obviously don't know all Autistic persons in the world, but in my experience over the years and knowing hundred of children and parents of Autistic childrens, I have never heard that. That is a fact whenever you like it or not. Maybe I have the statistic improbably of being with the smallest portion that like the puzzle piece, but I doubt it.And in almost all ASD events, you can found items for sale for founding, specially puzzle related items. And guess what. They usually run out of of stock, and the events attendance if mostly ASD parents and professionals.I feel this is like the controversy about "Autistic person" vs "Person with Autism". There are two points of view and no side is wrong, its just personal preferences.


1) If you are going to share false information about why the puzzle piece is used, I will call you out on that & explain the real reason.
2) The items for sale argument is incredibly faulty reasoning. Consumerism is not a way to prove it. Have you considered that maybe the parents just wanted to support a good cause? Those things are normally sold with proceeds going to a charity. Also, many of the parents don't understand why that symbol is considered so problematic. Which is kinda why I don't appreciate people making up false stories about the background to it.
3) The controversy over "Autistic person" vs "Person with Autism" is only comparable in as much as they are both about non-autistic (NT) people telling autistics what they should do/say/like. I personally prefer autistic person, as do the majority of those who are questioned on it (there's been various polls). I don't mind if someone else preferred being called a person with autism. What I dislike is NTs keeping on correcting the way we refer to ourselves or each other. You don't get to decide that.
I'm surprised they went with that artwork.

The jigsaw puzzle piece is quite offensive to a lot of autistic people.
Personally I was diagnosed in my final year at uni. I'd suspected it for quite some time but GP was unhelpful whenever I approached the subject seemingly thinking it was a pointless label.

Since then I've actually experienced discrimination in the recruitment space as well as in the workplace itself due to it. I recently won a grievance regarding my pay having been kept artificially lower than others in the same role as me for an extended period of time. At one point early on in my employment I was given feedback that essentially re-stated my autistic traits I had disclosed since recruitment as though they were performance weaknesses. At one stage a manager told me I was "just lazy and needed mothering".

Only something like 16% of autistics iirc are in full time work and many of them in my experience go through similar things to what I mentioned above because of lack of understanding and outright ableism. The mental health consequences of feeling like one is less valued and somehow defective or merely "tolerated" as an employee should not be underestimated.

It's disgusting the way autistic people are treated by employers if my multiple experiences (not just the above) are anything to go by and there really needs to be a push to make disability pay gap reporting mandatory.
Edited by: "JustExtreme" 16th Aug
Erinath16/08/2020 21:21

1) If you are going to share false information about why the puzzle piece …1) If you are going to share false information about why the puzzle piece is used, I will call you out on that & explain the real reason. 2) The items for sale argument is incredibly faulty reasoning. Consumerism is not a way to prove it. Have you considered that maybe the parents just wanted to support a good cause? Those things are normally sold with proceeds going to a charity. Also, many of the parents don't understand why that symbol is considered so problematic. Which is kinda why I don't appreciate people making up false stories about the background to it.3) The controversy over "Autistic person" vs "Person with Autism" is only comparable in as much as they are both about non-autistic (NT) people telling autistics what they should do/say/like. I personally prefer autistic person, as do the majority of those who are questioned on it (there's been various polls). I don't mind if someone else preferred being called a person with autism. What I dislike is NTs keeping on correcting the way we refer to ourselves or each other. You don't get to decide that.


Just as a note for 3), I also prefer Autistic child (or person).

But, as you continue: "false stories about the background" you give me no choice.
It make me remember the quote of Howe -A thief believes everybody steals-
It seems thst quote fit perfectly here...

Sorry, but I'm done answering people that simple think they are owner of the truth, and the process to "win" a discussion is discredit others without even know them nor the facts. No more answers to you, so you can go ahead and write whatever you like or need to feel better with yourself. Good luck.
Codelas16/08/2020 15:36

Comment deleted


Does this mean you wouldn't like to come under the "lable" of dyslexia?
jimel16/08/2020 15:24

As a parent of an autistic child, I'd strongly recommend against …As a parent of an autistic child, I'd strongly recommend against diagnosing oneself or anyone else based on symptoms, signs etc... If you feel you or your loved one might have special needs, goto a professional.


Problem is it can be a 2 year + wait
I was seeing a psychologist for a few issues largely managing pain but had weird brain stuff for years she said she's 90% sure I have undiagnosed ADHD as I wasn't hyperactive it went unnoticed (I'm 40 now) this explains a lot BUT she referred me for a proper diagnosis 18 months ago and I've still heard nothing so I'm kind of in limbo
I'd rather know so I can stop wasting my life so much as I e got like 5 chimps fighting in my brain and everything is exhausting mentally.
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