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Beekeeping: A Step-by-Step Guide to Setting Up and Maintaining a Hive Kindle Edition - Free @ Amazon
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Beekeeping: A Step-by-Step Guide to Setting Up and Maintaining a Hive Kindle Edition - Free @ Amazon

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Posted 31st Jul

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I know Some Get A Buzz Out Of Doing This !!!

Learn the satisfaction of harvesting your own, homegrown honey in this step-by-step guide to beekeeping, covering everything from aiding pollination to recognizing the queen bee to diagramming the parts of a hive. Maintain your own colony and you'll not only serve the ecosystem and enjoy delicious organic honey---you'll also discover how simple, fun, and even relaxing keeping bees can be.

Product details

Format: Kindle Edition
File Size: 2181 KB
Print Length: 144 pages
Publisher: Cedar Fort, Inc. (8 Jan. 2013)
Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
Language: English
ASIN: B00BQ01NJA
Text-to-Speech: Enabled
X-Ray:
Not Enabled
Word Wise: Not Enabled
Screen Reader: Supported
Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Customer reviews: 5.0 out of 5 stars3 customer ratings
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Top comments
Probably won't be a popular comment, as most people would rather stay ignorant, but just be aware that excessive farming of the western honey bee is contributing to many other wild species to go extinct - if you really want to help the bees, the best way is actually to buy less honey and if you do buy, make sure it is locally sourced. Planting native wild flowers is also great!

It takes one bee a whole lifetime to make just 1/12th of a teaspoon of honey.
Also, it makes it easier to stop eating so much it when you realise honey is stored in their stomach before they regurgitate it when they get back to the hive! Molasses or Maple Syrup are good alternatives, or just raw cane sugar
Edited by: "mfdoom420" 1st Aug
I can read this whilst listening to Sting.
Back home

Proper Tredisnaional way because we don't have too much resources 4584916791596291913.jpg11460502161596291962.jpg6705887911596292072.jpg10588460441596292104.jpg17607077441596292259.jpg19258507261596292308.jpg7932673591596292335.jpg13652731011596292369.jpg19207984861596292429.jpgQueen 😁



14421184521596292975.jpg
Edited by: "planet2sky" 1st Aug
nylec01/08/2020 15:50

Beekeeping is good for the environment, but I agree not on an industrial …Beekeeping is good for the environment, but I agree not on an industrial scale. And I don't eat honey either.


Really good website here that explains it all, there's a good reason why envonmental organisations don't recommend it.
google.com/amp…931
35 Comments
I can read this whilst listening to Sting.
I think this would be useful. All of the bees I've managed to catch and put in a jar so far have just died, no baby bees and no honey at all.
Edited by: "89quidyoucantgowrong" 31st Jul
Thanks Boz
Thanks Boz..
Buzzing!! Thanks honey x
89quidyoucantgowrong31/07/2020 22:48

I think this would be useful. All of the bees I've managed to catch and …I think this would be useful. All of the bees I've managed to catch and put in a jar so far have just died, no baby bees and no honey at all.


Those are flies. Heat added.
Daniel4201/08/2020 09:37

Those are flies. Heat added.


Aren't the government planning to stop advertising of junk food. Honey at 75% sugar and not much else surely must fall into the pure junk food category ;-)

Heat added.
Cheers, makes a change from my collection of cookery books, heat added.
Any beekeepers read this?
Got stung by a bee this morning!
looneytongueben01/08/2020 12:51

Got stung by a bee this morning!


Sorry to hear that. I always thought it's quite rare for Bees to actually sting anyone unless they feel threatened. Wasps are my pet dislike.
Probably won't be a popular comment, as most people would rather stay ignorant, but just be aware that excessive farming of the western honey bee is contributing to many other wild species to go extinct - if you really want to help the bees, the best way is actually to buy less honey and if you do buy, make sure it is locally sourced. Planting native wild flowers is also great!

It takes one bee a whole lifetime to make just 1/12th of a teaspoon of honey.
Also, it makes it easier to stop eating so much it when you realise honey is stored in their stomach before they regurgitate it when they get back to the hive! Molasses or Maple Syrup are good alternatives, or just raw cane sugar
Edited by: "mfdoom420" 1st Aug
mfdoom42001/08/2020 13:39

Probably won't be a popular comment, as most people would rather stay …Probably won't be a popular comment, as most people would rather stay ignorant, but just be aware that excessive farming of the western honey bee is contributing to many other wild species to go extinct - if you really want to help the bees, the best way is actually to buy less honey and if you do buy, make sure it is locally sourced. Planting native wild flowers is also great!It takes one bee a whole lifetime to make just 1/12th of a teaspoon of honey.Also, it makes it easier to stop eating so much it when you realise honey is stored in their stomach before they regurgitate it when they get back to the hive! Molasses is a healthy alternative, or just raw cane sugar


Beekeeping is good for the environment, but I agree not on an industrial scale. And I don't eat honey either.
Back home

Proper Tredisnaional way because we don't have too much resources 4584916791596291913.jpg11460502161596291962.jpg6705887911596292072.jpg10588460441596292104.jpg17607077441596292259.jpg19258507261596292308.jpg7932673591596292335.jpg13652731011596292369.jpg19207984861596292429.jpgQueen 😁



14421184521596292975.jpg
Edited by: "planet2sky" 1st Aug
Boz01/08/2020 13:14

Sorry to hear that. I always thought it's quite rare for Bees to actually …Sorry to hear that. I always thought it's quite rare for Bees to actually sting anyone unless they feel threatened. Wasps are my pet dislike.


It got tangled up in the dog's tail and I tried removing it.
looneytongueben01/08/2020 15:59

It got tangled up in the dog's tail and I tried removing it.


How aweful. Hope you feel better soon. Not a nice experience.😞
41554095-1ncSC.jpgsometimes very hard to catch from top of tree
planet2sky01/08/2020 15:52

Back home Proper Tredisnaional way because we don't have too much …Back home Proper Tredisnaional way because we don't have too much resources [Image] [Image] [Image] [Image] [Image] [Image] [Image] [Image] [Image] Queen 😁[Image]


Really interesting photos. Thanks for sharing 😁
mfdoom42001/08/2020 13:39

Probably won't be a popular comment, as most people would rather stay …Probably won't be a popular comment, as most people would rather stay ignorant, but just be aware that excessive farming of the western honey bee is contributing to many other wild species to go extinct - if you really want to help the bees, the best way is actually to buy less honey and if you do buy, make sure it is locally sourced. Planting native wild flowers is also great!It takes one bee a whole lifetime to make just 1/12th of a teaspoon of honey.Also, it makes it easier to stop eating so much it when you realise honey is stored in their stomach before they regurgitate it when they get back to the hive! Molasses or Maple Syrup are good alternatives, or just raw cane sugar


Completly right, if you want to help ecosystems plant some flowers or plants!
planet2sky01/08/2020 15:52

Back home Proper Tredisnaional way because we don't have too much …Back home Proper Tredisnaional way because we don't have too much resources [Image] [Image] [Image] [Image] [Image] [Image] [Image] [Image] [Image] Queen 😁[Image]



Great photographs. Thank you for sharing them with us.
Thank you, Boz. Another good find, sir. Sadly, I'm in no position to even contemplate keeping a hive, but I shal enjoy reading what's written about it.
Cheers Boz, I'm interested to know what is required to keep bees in the real world rather than just the ones I keep in Minecraft.
jaime-wa01/08/2020 19:09

Really interesting photos. Thanks for sharing 😁


You are welcome
Bert-Rib01/08/2020 21:46

Great photographs. Thank you for sharing them with us. … Great photographs. Thank you for sharing them with us.


You are welcome
planet2sky01/08/2020 16:50

[Image] sometimes very hard to catch from top of tree


Lovely photos, beautiful bees,
Thanks buzz..oops ..I mean boz hehe
Edited by: "carol.linton" 1st Aug
nylec01/08/2020 15:50

Beekeeping is good for the environment, but I agree not on an industrial …Beekeeping is good for the environment, but I agree not on an industrial scale. And I don't eat honey either.


Really good website here that explains it all, there's a good reason why envonmental organisations don't recommend it.
google.com/amp…931
Unbeelievably, I do have this book. Probably from one of your previous posts Boz, Cheers 🐝

ps: "and then all the bees left".
Edited by: "freyabo" 2nd Aug
looneytongueben01/08/2020 12:51

Got stung by a bee this morning!


Might e been a wasp
Bees don't sting unless they feel threatened and also die post stinging
mfdoom42001/08/2020 13:39

Probably won't be a popular comment, as most people would rather stay …Probably won't be a popular comment, as most people would rather stay ignorant, but just be aware that excessive farming of the western honey bee is contributing to many other wild species to go extinct - if you really want to help the bees, the best way is actually to buy less honey and if you do buy, make sure it is locally sourced. Planting native wild flowers is also great!It takes one bee a whole lifetime to make just 1/12th of a teaspoon of honey.Also, it makes it easier to stop eating so much it when you realise honey is stored in their stomach before they regurgitate it when they get back to the hive! Molasses or Maple Syrup are good alternatives, or just raw cane sugar


I totally agree about getting honey locally, if any one doesn't know how you can always look up and ring your local beekeeping association, they will know of lots for sale.
However I disagree that you framed your comment like people keeping bees for themselves is bad for wild/other bees. Many things have contributed to the decline of many wild bee species including climate change, use of pesticides and the introduction of diseases from other regions. But the harm is done these days from mass farming of honey, like you get at the supermarket, not from local beekeepers that often have 1-3 hives or so.
Equilibriate02/08/2020 19:22

I totally agree about getting honey locally, if any one doesn't know how …I totally agree about getting honey locally, if any one doesn't know how you can always look up and ring your local beekeeping association, they will know of lots for sale.However I disagree that you framed your comment like people keeping bees for themselves is bad for wild/other bees. Many things have contributed to the decline of many wild bee species including climate change, use of pesticides and the introduction of diseases from other regions. But the harm is done these days from mass farming of honey, like you get at the supermarket, not from local beekeepers that often have 1-3 hives or so.


I would like to believe your point and maybe it is true for beekeepers who are more scattered over a larger area in the countryside, but you certainly cannot state this overall. I don't know if you saw the article @nebno6 posted above, but here are some key points:

High numbers of honeybees can actively harm wild bee populations, because they compete directly for nectar and pollen. That’s not a problem when flowers are plentiful, but in environments where resources are limited, wild bees can be outcompeted. A lack of flowers is one of the main factors behind the decline in bee populations. Initiatives such as urban beekeeping put more pressure on wild bees and worsen the decline.

Honeybees are extremely efficient at collecting pollen and returning it to their hives, but as a consequence they transfer little to the flowers they visit. They are quantifiably less effective at pollination than wild bees, so changes in foraging patterns also have knock-on consequences for the plant community. When honeybees occur in high numbers, they can push wild bees out of an area, making it harder for wild plants to reproduce. Honeybees are not a substitute for wild pollinators, so we must protect the entire bee community to achieve good quality pollination.

Honeybee hives are regularly traded locally and internationally, allowing the rapid spread of diseases and parasites, such as deformed wing virus and Varroa mite. These pathogens can spill over from managed hives into wild bumblebee populations and spread between wild bee species when they visit the same flower. Responsible beekeepers should take steps to control pathogen levels within their hives to minimise transmission to wild bees.

When considering the evidence, the rise in amateur beekeeping is likely to cause more harm than good. No one will deny the value of our British beekeepers and the wonderful honey they provide, but if your motivation is to save the bees then here are some more effective steps you can take.
mfdoom42002/08/2020 19:56

I would like to believe your point and maybe it is true for beekeepers who …I would like to believe your point and maybe it is true for beekeepers who are more scattered over a larger area in the countryside, but you certainly cannot state this overall. I don't know if you saw the article @nebno6 posted above, but here are some key points:High numbers of honeybees can actively harm wild bee populations, because they compete directly for nectar and pollen. That’s not a problem when flowers are plentiful, but in environments where resources are limited, wild bees can be outcompeted. A lack of flowers is one of the main factors behind the decline in bee populations. Initiatives such as urban beekeeping put more pressure on wild bees and worsen the decline.Honeybees are extremely efficient at collecting pollen and returning it to their hives, but as a consequence they transfer little to the flowers they visit. They are quantifiably less effective at pollination than wild bees, so changes in foraging patterns also have knock-on consequences for the plant community. When honeybees occur in high numbers, they can push wild bees out of an area, making it harder for wild plants to reproduce. Honeybees are not a substitute for wild pollinators, so we must protect the entire bee community to achieve good quality pollination.Honeybee hives are regularly traded locally and internationally, allowing the rapid spread of diseases and parasites, such as deformed wing virus and Varroa mite. These pathogens can spill over from managed hives into wild bumblebee populations and spread between wild bee species when they visit the same flower. Responsible beekeepers should take steps to control pathogen levels within their hives to minimise transmission to wild bees.When considering the evidence, the rise in amateur beekeeping is likely to cause more harm than good. No one will deny the value of our British beekeepers and the wonderful honey they provide, but if your motivation is to save the bees then here are some more effective steps you can take.


I have had to do some research so this is a very constructive conversation! I didn't honestly realise that honeybees could have a negative effect on other pollinators. After doing some reading it does indeed seem that yes in some situations/locations yes they can. But that being said I think hobbyist beekeeping should still be encouraged as much as possible. You see there used to be native honeybees in the UK (and a lot of places) that now just don't exist in the wild, because of human intervention, and currently the only way we can keep strong numbers of colonies is by management. This will also hopefully lead to the breeding of stains of bees that return to the wild and survive.
Another big positive is that beekeepers will often be the biggest proponents of natual/wild habitat restoration and reducing the use of pesticides which are also the biggest reasons for the decline of other wild bees and pollinators.
They may be very efficient but look at nature, honeybees have evolved with flowers in a symbiotic way for millions of years.
Like a nice dollop of bee puke on my toast, yum!

A friend just bought and assembled a beehive this weekend (she couldn't believe how many complex little bits were involved!!) so I shall send her this link, thanks OP. :-)
joetheheartbreaker02/08/2020 12:34

Bees don't sting unless they feel threatened and also die post stinging


First part is correct but the second part depends on the species. Honey bees die after stinging you but bumble bees can sting repeatedly
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