BELDRAY Ceramic Fan Heater @ Currys £9.97 (CLEARANCE) was £24.99 Free delivery
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BELDRAY Ceramic Fan Heater @ Currys £9.97 (CLEARANCE) was £24.99 Free delivery

39
Found 4th Nov 2014
They have a range of colors:
blue
white
black
pink
i ordered the blue one. click and collect is available.

Bring some warmth to the room with the portable white Beldray EH0397DSGW Ceramic Fan Heater.

With 1500 W of power and two heat settings, the Beldray EH0397DSGW Heater will heat any area quickly and effectively.

The heater is light and compact so it can be carried easily from room to room.

For complete peace of mind the Beldray EH0397DSGW is fitted with a safety shut-off mechanism should it be tipped over and overheating protection.

Banish the cold with the white Beldray EH0397DSGW Ceramic Fan Heater.

OVERVIEW
Type Ceramic fan heater
Oil type Oil-free
Power 1500 W
Colour White
FEATURES
Speed settings 1
Heat settings 2
Tilt / Pivot No
Oscillating No
Safety cut out Yes
GENERAL
Portable Yes
Power supply Mains
Power cord length 1.5 m
Dimensions 200 x 180 x 250 mm (H x W x D)
Weight 1.44 kg
Manufacturer’s gurantee 1 year

39 Comments

Anybody any idea how good these are? How hard are they on electric?

heat added, great price

Thanks OP! Looks like a handy little device.

Looks good but can't seem to find any reviews.

any feedback from someone who actually ordered it and tried it?

Ordered one thanks - thought it might be ideal for camping - it was so cold and damp for the last two years !

Thanks I need one of toe. I have ordered the black one.

I have the black one

cmv157

Anybody any idea how good these are? How hard are they on electric?



Approx 23p an hour to run

Ordered the blue one.... dunno why tho...! LOL!

Good deal.

Thanks OP - went for the white one as it seemed to be the only available for home delivery. Excellent deal!

Great price but some people question the efficiency of these.

Nice find OP, ordered.

delivery not available

cmv157

Anybody any idea how good these are? How hard are they on electric?

They are basically an electric fan heater, so have most of their pros and cons, if you want to compare them with other forms of heating. As they use positive temperature coefficient (PTC) ceramic blocks instead of resistance wire, they are much safer than most portable heaters - if, say, a duvet falls on one whilst it is running, fire or even damage is unlikely to result. This model doesn't have a thermostatic control, so it will cost most people more to run than one that does - as it will continue to run even when the room is at the required temperature, until manually shut off. It's nominally 1500W - so it uses 1.5kW hours (or 3 meter units every two hours) on full output. If you pay 20 p a unit and run it for 4 hours, 7 days a week, it will cost £5.60 a week to run.

curry's is the worst shop I ever known. although heat added for op who dare to shop at curry's.

Rom

Great price but some people question the efficiency of these.


The efficiency of these is exactly the same as any other electric heater - 100%.

Grrrrrrrrrrr

They are basically an electric fan heater, so have most of their pros … They are basically an electric fan heater, so have most of their pros and cons, if you want to compare them with other forms of heating. As they use positive temperature coefficient (PTC) ceramic blocks instead of resistance wire, they are much safer than most portable heaters - if, say, a duvet falls on one whilst it is running, fire or even damage is unlikely to result. This model doesn't have a thermostatic control, so it will cost most people more to run than one that does - as it will continue to run even when the room is at the required temperature, until manually shut off. It's nominally 1500W - so it uses 1.5kW hours (or 3 meter units every two hours) on full output. If you pay 20 p a unit and run it for 4 hours, 7 days a week, it will cost £5.60 a week to run.


Not sure in practice PTC makes any difference (sounds like marketing guff in the same way they used to claim these were more "efficent" before they were banned from doing so, and all fan heaters have a thermal cutout) but the point about a thermostat is very important. It is easy for us to get used to a gradual temperature rise in a room to excessive levels, resulting in wasted energy/money.

pibpob

The efficiency of these is exactly the same as any other electric heater … The efficiency of these is exactly the same as any other electric heater - 100%.

Nothing invented is 100% efficient........Bring on the nonsense guys,lol.

So I take it having your gas heaters on overnight rather than this on for a couple of hours is a better idea?

GunnerGraham

Nothing invented is 100% efficient........Bring on the nonsense guys,lol.


Well that statement is untrue because it would break the law of conservation of energy if it were otherwise. But I guess you're just here on a wind-up mission *shrug*.

For everyone else: the one thing to be absolutely clear about is that fan, halogen, convector, oil-filled, or any other sort of electric heater will produce the same amount of heat per unit electricity. It might be distributed differently, and it might be released with a different amount of delay, but you're not going to do miracles to your electricity bill by buying a "new" or different type of heater.
Edited by: "pibpob" 5th Nov 2014

MrRight

So I take it having your gas heaters on overnight rather than this on for … So I take it having your gas heaters on overnight rather than this on for a couple of hours is a better idea?


I doubt having this on for a couple of hours will keep your room warm for the same length of time as what I presume is central heating being left on overnight, so not really a fair comparison. Even if you mean having this on all the time vs central heating being on all the time, it's impossible to answer because there is so much information missing.
Edited by: "pibpob" 5th Nov 2014

pibpob

Not sure in practice PTC makes any difference (sounds like marketing … Not sure in practice PTC makes any difference (sounds like marketing guff in the same way they used to claim these were more "efficent" before they were banned from doing so, and all fan heaters have a thermal cutout) but the point about a thermostat is very important. It is easy for us to get used to a gradual temperature rise in a room to excessive levels, resulting in wasted energy/money.

"Efficiency" is an interesting characteristic, when it comes to room heating. If the point of heating is to keep occupants (not the whole room) at a particular temperature, local radiant heaters and particularly contact heating (electric blankets, hot water bottles and shared bodily warmth) take some beating. PTC makes no difference, it is basically just a fan heater, the same as any other fan heater, when it comes to "efficiency". Yes, all fan heaters do have thermal cutouts - but you can end up with a situation under reduced airflow, where the wire elements are glowing red hot, but there is still sufficient cool air entering the heater to prevent the local cutout from tripping on over temperature. The red hot wires provide a lot of radiant energy that can *seriously* overheat an object in front of them -that object, of course, not getting the cool air flow that the inside of the case is getting. We used to toast crumpets that way - put fan heater vertical and cover the grill in crumpets. The wires would glow red hot and the crumpets toast nicely. Ah, student days were happy days.... It is still possible with wire element heaters with a base switch, but I expect that you don't need me to say how. It's totally impossible with a PTC ceramic heater which reduces power consumption as its temperature rises and will usually never get > 70c.
Edited by: "Grrrrrrrrrrr" 5th Nov 2014

Yes, indeed reduced airflow will increase the temperature and radiant heat - but the same effect will be exploited by the positioning and operating point of the thermal cutout such that it will trip. Well that's the theory anyway! Will a PTC element in one of these things really never get above 70C? If so, that's excellent as it's as safe as a radiator. But if it consists of one or several chains of elements in series, rather than each one across the mains, then a partial blockage could still cause a localised very high temperature. Maybe they really are a lot better and it's just a shame that they were marketed originally with a lie about efficiency rather than a real selling point about safety.

pibpob

I doubt having this on for a couple of hours will keep your room warm for … I doubt having this on for a couple of hours will keep your room warm for the same length of time as what I presume is central heating being left on overnight, so not really a fair comparison. Even if you mean having this on all the time vs central heating being on all the time, it's impossible to answer because there is so much information missing.



Well from a purely financial perspective, 2 hours of this or 8 hours of central heating? I know the electric heaters eat through money but how does it compare to central heating.

It would be for my babies room, maybe putting it on an hour at night and an hour in the morning for her rather than leaving the heating on low overnight.

MrRight

Well from a purely financial perspective, 2 hours of this or 8 hours of … Well from a purely financial perspective, 2 hours of this or 8 hours of central heating? I know the electric heaters eat through money but how does it compare to central heating.It would be for my babies room, maybe putting it on an hour at night and an hour in the morning for her rather than leaving the heating on low overnight.


Unfortunately there are many factors that can affect the calculation, like how much you pay for a kWh of gas compared with electricity, how efficient your gas boiler is in this situation (it will be less than the 90% or so absolute best figure in real use), how much loss there is between the boiler and the radiators, what other rooms are being heated, how big the other rooms are compared with the one you mean to heat, how many outside walls they all have, how good is the wall insulation, how good is the floor insulation, what's the outside temperature, how much wear and tear will be inflicted on the boiler, etc. But I would suspect you would want a rather more constant temperature in the baby's room than would be possible from two blasts of heat at full power, so this thing really wouldn't be suitable - you need a heater with a thermostat or a plug-in thermostat you can control the heater with, and to leave it on all the time the room's occupied.

GunnerGraham

Nothing invented is 100% efficient........Bring on the nonsense guys,lol.

Actually all electric heaters convert at least 99% of electric to heat. So yeah do some research?

whilst electric heaters are pretty much 100 percent efficient at converting electric energy into heat energy, they are not that cost effective, ie, converting your £ into a warm home. personally I feel these should only be used as a boost for a particularly cold room on the coldest of days, and not as the primary method of heating a room. that is just my opinion though.

Better off with oil filled radiator


or halogen heater fo persoanl use

Original Poster

Grrrrrrrrrrr

They are basically an electric fan heater, so have most of their pros … They are basically an electric fan heater, so have most of their pros and cons, if you want to compare them with other forms of heating. As they use positive temperature coefficient (PTC) ceramic blocks instead of resistance wire, they are much safer than most portable heaters - if, say, a duvet falls on one whilst it is running, fire or even damage is unlikely to result. This model doesn't have a thermostatic control, so it will cost most people more to run than one that does - as it will continue to run even when the room is at the required temperature, until manually shut off. It's nominally 1500W - so it uses 1.5kW hours (or 3 meter units every two hours) on full output. If you pay 20 p a unit and run it for 4 hours, 7 days a week, it will cost £5.60 a week to run.



i received mine, it does have a thermostat.

Grrrrrrrrrrr

They are basically an electric fan heater, so have most of their pros … They are basically an electric fan heater, so have most of their pros and cons, if you want to compare them with other forms of heating. As they use positive temperature coefficient (PTC) ceramic blocks instead of resistance wire, they are much safer than most portable heaters - if, say, a duvet falls on one whilst it is running, fire or even damage is unlikely to result. This model doesn't have a thermostatic control, so it will cost most people more to run than one that does - as it will continue to run even when the room is at the required temperature, until manually shut off. It's nominally 1500W - so it uses 1.5kW hours (or 3 meter units every two hours) on full output. If you pay 20 p a unit and run it for 4 hours, 7 days a week, it will cost £5.60 a week to run.



Hi Grrr. Just had mine delivered and it does have a thermostat on this model. So should be OK. Have tried it out and very impressed at how quickly it heats up. Wouldn't say it would be best for a large room as it is a small unit but very good for a
quick warm up having come in from the cold or waiting on the central heating to fire up

I've tried mine out - it's ideal for my use to heat up a single room for a short period instead of putting heating on.

It has a thermostat so that's a big plus, the lead is probably a bit short but for £10 it's a bargain.

brilliant buy! I got 2 now and now none in stock

They still have the black, blue and pink still in stock

After less than 2 hours of use mine has now stopped working! Maybe not such a good deal after all.

themorgatron

After less than 2 hours of use mine has now stopped working! Maybe not … After less than 2 hours of use mine has now stopped working! Maybe not such a good deal after all.


Sample of one is insignificant although no less annoying for you, of course. There's also the "bathtub curve" - things are more likely to fail when they are new.
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