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Belkin E-Series 6 Way/ 6 Plug SurgeStrip Surge Protected Extension Lead - 1 m Cable, White - £6.75 (+£4.49 Non-Prime) @ Amazon
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Belkin E-Series 6 Way/ 6 Plug SurgeStrip Surge Protected Extension Lead - 1 m Cable, White - £6.75 (+£4.49 Non-Prime) @ Amazon

£6.75Amazon Deals
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933° Expired
Belkin E-Series 6 Way/ 6 Plug SurgeStrip Surge Protected Extension Lead - 1 m Cable, White - £6.75 (+£4.49 Non-Prime) @ Amazon
Posted 10th Oct 2020

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Fab low price here for the surge protection extension - especially with prime for free delivery.

Description
  • Provides premium power protection for your laptop, television, cable box, and other home theatre equipment.
  • Protects and charges tablets, smartphones, or other devices at fast speeds.
  • Extends the life of your electronics.
  • Maintains data integrity.
  • Contains or smothers fire caused by a large surge.
  • Protection and safety for plugged in electronic devices during storms.

Hope it helps someone.
Community Updates
Top comments
benhornsby199911/10/2020 00:50

Can extension leads do this?


Any extension lead that the power line adapter is connected through will have an adverse effect on signal to noise ratio and usable bandwidth. Those with mains noise filtering, which the better "surge protection" devices have, cannot differentiate between these signals and noise and will attenuate both. They can even affect adapters plugged into wall sockets on the same ring.
nacho9911/10/2020 11:22

what is a 476 J energy rating?


The J stands for Joule, which is a measure of energy, so they are claiming that it can cope with a power surge of up to 476 Joules.
In theory the higher the J rating the more protection you have but I'm rather cynical about whether any of these "surge protection" devices actually work.
16 Comments
Are these the ones that make power line adapters throw a bitchfit ?
Kingydaman10/10/2020 23:43

Are these the ones that make power line adapters throw a bitchfit ?


Can extension leads do this?
Thanks matwalaboy, Just bought one and heat added
benhornsby199911/10/2020 00:50

Can extension leads do this?


Yep, power line kits recommend plugging straight into the wall and not through an extension.
benhornsby199911/10/2020 00:50

Can extension leads do this?


Any extension lead that the power line adapter is connected through will have an adverse effect on signal to noise ratio and usable bandwidth. Those with mains noise filtering, which the better "surge protection" devices have, cannot differentiate between these signals and noise and will attenuate both. They can even affect adapters plugged into wall sockets on the same ring.
what is a 476 J energy rating?
It’s always typical that a deal pops up for an item you’re after...just AFTER you’ve bought it
nacho9911/10/2020 11:22

what is a 476 J energy rating?


The J stands for Joule, which is a measure of energy, so they are claiming that it can cope with a power surge of up to 476 Joules.
In theory the higher the J rating the more protection you have but I'm rather cynical about whether any of these "surge protection" devices actually work.
Grrrrrrrrrrr11/10/2020 09:38

Any extension lead that the power line adapter is connected through will …Any extension lead that the power line adapter is connected through will have an adverse effect on signal to noise ratio and usable bandwidth. Those with mains noise filtering, which the better "surge protection" devices have, cannot differentiate between these signals and noise and will attenuate both. They can even affect adapters plugged into wall sockets on the same ring.


Very helpful information thanks very much!
Delbert.Grady11/10/2020 12:05

The J stands for Joule, which is a measure of energy, so they are claiming …The J stands for Joule, which is a measure of energy, so they are claiming that it can cope with a power surge of up to 476 Joules.In theory the higher the J rating the more protection you have but I'm rather cynical about whether any of these "surge protection" devices actually work.


It’s not so much the fact whether they work, more so if they have done. More often than not they only work once and you have not easy way of testing this. Once failed the device can cause RCDs to trip due to the leakage to earth caused by the failed/activated surge protective feature.
Delbert.Grady11/10/2020 12:05

The J stands for Joule, which is a measure of energy, so they are claiming …The J stands for Joule, which is a measure of energy, so they are claiming that it can cope with a power surge of up to 476 Joules.In theory the higher the J rating the more protection you have but I'm rather cynical about whether any of these "surge protection" devices actually work.


There are two different protection measures present - the first is a MOV device to ABSORB the energy in voltage spikes (eg lightning) - 476 Joules is enough energy to kill a small herd of elephants - but it does that by taking damage. So, when those 476 cumulative Joules are absorbed, there is no reserve capacity left. The second is to dump excess energy into the protective conductor (earth wire). The impedance of that protective conductor limits the instantaneous current flow - so the MOV absorbs the first bit and the protective conductor dumps the rest. If you plug extension lead into extension lead - the impedance is so high that near enough everything has to be absorbed rather than dumped. Hence they DO work, but one plugged direct into a wall socket works better than one on the end of an extension lead (lower impedance) and one at the chain of extension leads work least well of all.
Grrrrrrrrrrr11/10/2020 15:00

There are two different protection measures present - the first is a MOV …There are two different protection measures present - the first is a MOV device to ABSORB the energy in voltage spikes (eg lightning) - 476 Joules is enough energy to kill a small herd of elephants - but it does that by taking damage. So, when those 476 cumulative Joules are absorbed, there is no reserve capacity left. The second is to dump excess energy into the protective conductor (earth wire). The impedance of that protective conductor limits the instantaneous current flow - so the MOV absorbs the first bit and the protective conductor dumps the rest. If you plug extension lead into extension lead - the impedance is so high that near enough everything has to be absorbed rather than dumped. Hence they DO work, but one plugged direct into a wall socket works better than one on the end of an extension lead (lower impedance) and one at the chain of extension leads work least well of all.


What, in your learned opinion, would be the best way to protect plugged-in electronics (PC, laptop, display, speakers, smartphone) from potential power surges? What's the likelihood of a power surge incident?

Thanks for taking the time to answer these questions.
red_dwarfer11/10/2020 11:29

It’s always typical that a deal pops up for an item you’re after...just AFT …It’s always typical that a deal pops up for an item you’re after...just AFTER you’ve bought it


It's dispatched in 1 to 2 months so you can rest easy in your purchase
MidlandMadHatter11/10/2020 16:09

What, in your learned opinion, would be the best way to protect plugged-in …What, in your learned opinion, would be the best way to protect plugged-in electronics (PC, laptop, display, speakers, smartphone) from potential power surges? What's the likelihood of a power surge incident? Thanks for taking the time to answer these questions.


The best way is a double conversion UPS. That generates its own "mains" and thus there is near zero possibility of a mains-bourne transient getting to the kit. (Of course, there is still the phone line, router and ethernet cable as a potential path).

The overall impedance of the mains distribution network is VERY low, so transients don't travel far along it from the source. So, if you and your LV neighbours plus transformer are sat on the top of an exposed hill, you will be at much greater risk than your neighbours in the valley below. I live in open moorland with overhead LV lines across the moor - so the risk is a lot greater than average. So I have a double conversion UPS and a generator - it can be a day or more until mains is restored if we have a strike on the line. Most of the UK isn't at anything like that risk. I've never bothered having ANY surge protection elsewhere - but we lost a phone and then a modem in the first year. You will probably know that you live in a risky area, if you have spent a Winter there, already. (Sorry LV= "low voltage= 240v.)
Grrrrrrrrrrr11/10/2020 18:13

The best way is a double conversion UPS. That generates its own "mains" …The best way is a double conversion UPS. That generates its own "mains" and thus there is near zero possibility of a mains-bourne transient getting to the kit. (Of course, there is still the phone line, router and ethernet cable as a potential path). The overall impedance of the mains distribution network is VERY low, so transients don't travel far along it from the source. So, if you and your LV neighbours plus transformer are sat on the top of an exposed hill, you will be at much greater risk than your neighbours in the valley below. I live in open moorland with overhead LV lines across the moor - so the risk is a lot greater than average. So I have a double conversion UPS and a generator - it can be a day or more until mains is restored if we have a strike on the line. Most of the UK isn't at anything like that risk. I've never bothered having ANY surge protection elsewhere - but we lost a phone and then a modem in the first year. You will probably know that you live in a risky area, if you have spent a Winter there, already. (Sorry LV= "low voltage= 240v.)


Thank you so much for the answer, it's proved super informative. Take care now, be well.
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