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Bird Nesting Box £3.32 (£3.03 if 5+) + Free delivery for orders over £8 @ CPC Farnell
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Bird Nesting Box £3.32 (£3.03 if 5+) + Free delivery for orders over £8 @ CPC Farnell

9
Posted 13th Jul

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

£3.32 or £3.03 if you order 5+

Cheapest nesting boxes I have found. Putting mine up soon ready for Autumn

Delivery free over £8
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Thank you! The more nesting boxes we make available for our lovely little friends the better, for sparrows, blue tits, wrens, some beautiful little finches, robins etc. They all welcome our help.

Right at the end of a dreary British winter, the blackbirds start their wonderful song, the leafless trees are filled with excited groups of blue tits, and many little birds are very busy getting ready to start a family. It's a great time of year, made even better if you have a little avian mum and dad moving into your nesting box.

I read that many of these little birds roost in the boxes to keep dry and comfy from the worst of the winter weather, and also that if a box has been up for some months they are much more likely to nest in it than if it arrived in late winter just in time for nesting (though this is still infinitely better than nothing!). The birds like to see that it is as safe as possible and not temporary, and they also prefer it if the scent of humans has gone, so it is best to get the box installed asap. Fixing the box around three metres or so above the ground seems ideal, with a nice straight approach for safety, and away from fences etc where a cat or squirrel can wander along and hook out an easy snack. If installing one in a tree it is worth trying to ensure that you position it to make it difficult for predators to wander up and get a paw or clawed foot inside. Facing east is apparently ideal, though frankly I think they're simply glad to find somewhere safe and dry.

There is much to read online (eg the RSPB website) about siting the box for the best chance of it being accepted, and what size the hole should be for your intended species. It's 25mm for blue tits, which is tiny (about an inch!), but it prevents the larger, more aggressive species getting in, which instinctively helps the blue tits feel safer.

The little perches people kindly fix on the front of the box apparently aren't a good idea as they're liable to be used by predators. The intended occupants don't need them anyway, so no point in risking their and their little brood's safety.

There's no need to decorate the box as birds prefer them not to stand out, and to blend in as much as possible. Any chemicals like paint, stain, varnish etc are likely to be harmful to birds, so 'au naturel' is best!

There is an interesting little blog here bto.org/our…log about the very busy couple of months the parents will be having in May and June, and how we may help them with some rich food to keep their strength up.

I keep my cat indoors as much as possible around the time when blue tots are flying from the nest, as this is their first ever flight and they'll need to get from the box to safety in one faltering go, whilst their anxious parents look on. Cats do not make good babysitters for fledglings, and like foxes are programmed to chase and kill, even if they don't eat what they kill. The chicks will only fly away once - they don't return again that night or anything, so once all of them have flown they will hopefully be safe under the watchful eyes of their parents to learn to collect food, avoid predators and become independent, decent and responsible. As an aside, if you grow brassicas you'll be interested to know that the average chick requires around 100 caterpillars a day during its time in the box and afterwards. That means the dad will be collecting around 1000 caterpillars a day for the kids, as well as food for him and his wife. That's why a nearby source of nuts and sunflower seeds will be of tremendous help to them during this incredibly busy, stressful time.

At the end of the nesting season don't forget to clear the old nest out as it will not be re-used and may contain tiny parasites etc. This will save next season's tenants lots of preparatory work, and help to make chicks healthier. Be certain though that the chicks have fledged and that a second or even third brood isn't underway.

Sticking or stapling something like a little bit of plastic sheet, plastic take-away container lid or similar on the box roof can make it a drier, warmer home, and will help it to last longer. It's also good to ensure a few little drainage holes are drilled through the base just in case rainwater gets in. These holes may also be used by the birds to sweep waste out of the box before or during nesting.

It's such a treat to know you helped a little family on its way in life.
9 Comments
Free delivery? Doesn't say that when you add to basket? Or am I a bit thick.. 😁
alwayslfc13/07/2019 18:37

Free delivery? Doesn't say that when you add to basket? Or am I a bit …Free delivery? Doesn't say that when you add to basket? Or am I a bit thick.. 😁


Don't think you are being thick here, CPC Website used to be clearer about delivery, or maybe it's the mobile version that's not.

Anyway, spend over 8 splats, ex VAT, get free delivery.

P. S It was just five quid not that long ago.
Edited by: "Broc_Mudflap" 13th Jul
alwayslfc13/07/2019 18:37

Free delivery? Doesn't say that when you add to basket? Or am I a bit …Free delivery? Doesn't say that when you add to basket? Or am I a bit thick.. 😁


Orders under £8 incur a £3.50 'handling fee' :/
Broc_Mudflap13/07/2019 18:42

Don't think you are being thick here, CPC Website used to be clearer about …Don't think you are being thick here, CPC Website used to be clearer about delivery, or maybe it's the mobile version that's not. Anyway, spend over 8 splats, ex VAT, get free delivery.P. S It was just five quid not that long ago.


Thanks for clearing that up...
I knew I wasn't Totally thick.. 😁
is this standard or surge protected...
Good for wasp bings heat
It's orders over £9.60 including VAT to get free delivery, initial post needs to clarify the price for free postage is £8 plus 20% VAT

Good price if you can up an order for free post
Edited by: "spannerzone" 13th Jul
Thank you! The more nesting boxes we make available for our lovely little friends the better, for sparrows, blue tits, wrens, some beautiful little finches, robins etc. They all welcome our help.

Right at the end of a dreary British winter, the blackbirds start their wonderful song, the leafless trees are filled with excited groups of blue tits, and many little birds are very busy getting ready to start a family. It's a great time of year, made even better if you have a little avian mum and dad moving into your nesting box.

I read that many of these little birds roost in the boxes to keep dry and comfy from the worst of the winter weather, and also that if a box has been up for some months they are much more likely to nest in it than if it arrived in late winter just in time for nesting (though this is still infinitely better than nothing!). The birds like to see that it is as safe as possible and not temporary, and they also prefer it if the scent of humans has gone, so it is best to get the box installed asap. Fixing the box around three metres or so above the ground seems ideal, with a nice straight approach for safety, and away from fences etc where a cat or squirrel can wander along and hook out an easy snack. If installing one in a tree it is worth trying to ensure that you position it to make it difficult for predators to wander up and get a paw or clawed foot inside. Facing east is apparently ideal, though frankly I think they're simply glad to find somewhere safe and dry.

There is much to read online (eg the RSPB website) about siting the box for the best chance of it being accepted, and what size the hole should be for your intended species. It's 25mm for blue tits, which is tiny (about an inch!), but it prevents the larger, more aggressive species getting in, which instinctively helps the blue tits feel safer.

The little perches people kindly fix on the front of the box apparently aren't a good idea as they're liable to be used by predators. The intended occupants don't need them anyway, so no point in risking their and their little brood's safety.

There's no need to decorate the box as birds prefer them not to stand out, and to blend in as much as possible. Any chemicals like paint, stain, varnish etc are likely to be harmful to birds, so 'au naturel' is best!

There is an interesting little blog here bto.org/our…log about the very busy couple of months the parents will be having in May and June, and how we may help them with some rich food to keep their strength up.

I keep my cat indoors as much as possible around the time when blue tots are flying from the nest, as this is their first ever flight and they'll need to get from the box to safety in one faltering go, whilst their anxious parents look on. Cats do not make good babysitters for fledglings, and like foxes are programmed to chase and kill, even if they don't eat what they kill. The chicks will only fly away once - they don't return again that night or anything, so once all of them have flown they will hopefully be safe under the watchful eyes of their parents to learn to collect food, avoid predators and become independent, decent and responsible. As an aside, if you grow brassicas you'll be interested to know that the average chick requires around 100 caterpillars a day during its time in the box and afterwards. That means the dad will be collecting around 1000 caterpillars a day for the kids, as well as food for him and his wife. That's why a nearby source of nuts and sunflower seeds will be of tremendous help to them during this incredibly busy, stressful time.

At the end of the nesting season don't forget to clear the old nest out as it will not be re-used and may contain tiny parasites etc. This will save next season's tenants lots of preparatory work, and help to make chicks healthier. Be certain though that the chicks have fledged and that a second or even third brood isn't underway.

Sticking or stapling something like a little bit of plastic sheet, plastic take-away container lid or similar on the box roof can make it a drier, warmer home, and will help it to last longer. It's also good to ensure a few little drainage holes are drilled through the base just in case rainwater gets in. These holes may also be used by the birds to sweep waste out of the box before or during nesting.

It's such a treat to know you helped a little family on its way in life.
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