Black Nikon D5200 Digital SLR with 18-55 VR II Lens £299 @ Tesco
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Black Nikon D5200 Digital SLR with 18-55 VR II Lens £299 @ Tesco

51
Found 26th Jan 2016
Hey guys, I've been looking for an upgrade for a while now and was tempted to buy the D3300 posted last week for £249.99 at Tesco but the colour threw me :P

I wasnt able to find this cheaper anywhere other than those "grey import" websites.

From Tesco:
Discover new perspectives with the inspirational D5200 from Nikon.

From breath-taking photos to smooth Full HD movies, this D-SLR can't wait to bring out your creative side. The flexible vari-angle monitor empowers your vision with unique views that's combined with the 24.1-megapixel DX-format CMOS sensor that captures finely detailed images, as the advanced 39-point autofocus system is always on target. Nikon's amazingly accurate 2,016-pixel light metering sensor ensures exact exposures in even difficult lighting conditions.

Using the D5200's built-in features, you can render special effects for movies or stills in real time. Nikon's wireless mobile adapter lets you send your creations straight to a compatible smart device for instant sharing.
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51 Comments
What are you upgrading from? Keep in mind this model has been replaced twice already.
Nice bit of kit, though the 5300 is markedly better (and markedly more expensive).

Really great price.
Oneday77

What are you upgrading from? Keep in mind this model has been replaced … What are you upgrading from? Keep in mind this model has been replaced twice already.


Hi Oneday, I have had a D3000 for a few years and think its now time for an upgrade. Yes, I'm aware the D5200 is two generations old but comparing it to D3300 this seems to fit my needs more and for £300 this doesnt seem too bad The autofocus system is also appealing compared to a lot less on D3300
Edited by: "Affluenza124" 26th Jan 2016
Take it this one has no gps or wifi?
beckysdaddy1

Take it this one has no gps or wifi?


You will need to purchase an adapter for Wifi and it does not have gps
Edited by: "Affluenza124" 26th Jan 2016
Affluenza124

Hi Oneday, I have had a D3000 for a few years and think its now time for … Hi Oneday, I have had a D3000 for a few years and think its now time for an upgrade. Yes, I'm aware the D5200 is two generations old but comparing it to D3300 this seems to fit my needs more and for £300 this doesnt seem too bad


From a D3000 it would be an OK upgrade. Personally I'd skip the D5k range and get a used d7100 and trade in your D3000.
Cex gives 2 year warranties now. The d7 range has motor bodies allowing a greater range of lenses to be used.
You can buy the D5300 for £359 (body only), might be an option if you already have a lens. Heat added.
This or Sony A6000(considering A6000 is more expensive)? Could somebody enlighten me please?? Heat from me for sure.
Edited by: "kkthomask" 26th Jan 2016
kkthomask

This or Sony A6000(considering A6000 is more expensive)? Could somebody … This or Sony A6000(considering A6000 is more expensive)? Could somebody enlighten me please?? Heat from me for sure.



They're very similar cameras in terms of functionality and photographic capabilities, I really would make the choice based on your preferred form factor. The D5200 is larger, which means less portable but also means space for a more substantial grip and an optical viewfinder. The A6000 is more compact and has an electronic viewfinder that can be a pro or a con depending on each user's preference. The Nikon has an articulating screen that can be flipped out to the side, the A6000 has a hinged screen than flips out over the top. The Nikon lens lineup is a lot larger and more varied, while being a mirrorless camera means you can adapt lots of different lenses to the Sony at the expense of some/all autofocus performance (depending on the lenses and adaptors used).
ElGofre

They're very similar cameras in terms of functionality and photographic … They're very similar cameras in terms of functionality and photographic capabilities, I really would make the choice based on your preferred form factor. The D5200 is larger, which means less portable but also means space for a more substantial grip and an optical viewfinder. The A6000 is more compact and has an electronic viewfinder that can be a pro or a con depending on each user's preference. The Nikon has an articulating screen that can be flipped out to the side, the A6000 has a hinged screen than flips out over the top. The Nikon lens lineup is a lot larger and more varied, while being a mirrorless camera means you can adapt lots of different lenses to the Sony at the expense of some/all autofocus performance (depending on the lenses and adaptors used).


Thanks. Single question- Could i produce nearly similar quality picture with A6000?(both indoor and outdoor)
kkthomask

Thanks. Single question- Could i produce nearly similar quality picture … Thanks. Single question- Could i produce nearly similar quality picture with A6000?(both indoor and outdoor)



Nikon have used Sony's sensors in their entry level cameras for a while, the sensor in the D5200 is most likely either a slightly older, slight variation or potentially an almost identical one to the A6000. Assuming similar quality lenses, image quality will be virtually the same, and as a beginner to the hobby, you are going to be a larger limitation on your image quality than your gear is!

Simply put, you should be very happy with the image quality from either of these cameras
I WANT THIS!, don't ask me why?.

I just want it ... hahahaha. :-)

Ironically though, on Tesco's Site I did an SLR Search, & the Nikon D3300 is the SAME £299 as the OP's D5200 is? (makes you wonder, huh?), lool. :-)
The OP's Deal?, or this one:

Buy Nikon D5300 Digital SLR, Black, 24.2 Mega Pixel, Wi-Fi, 18-55mm Lens from our SLR Camera range - Tesco

tesco.com/dir…127

Someone earlier asked about if the Nikon D5200 had WiFi?, & somebody else responded it had neither WiFi or GPS, but for just under an extra £100, my above link has both .....

Any thoughts on the above guys?, thanx. :-)
ElGofre

Nikon have used Sony's sensors in their entry level cameras for a while, … Nikon have used Sony's sensors in their entry level cameras for a while, the sensor in the D5200 is most likely either a slightly older, slight variation or potentially an almost identical one to the A6000. Assuming similar quality lenses, image quality will be virtually the same, and as a beginner to the hobby, you are going to be a larger limitation on your image quality than your gear is!Simply put, you should be very happy with the image quality from either of these cameras



OK but you're buying into a lens system.

You should buy the brand that carries the lens range you want.

The Sony E-mount lens range for the A6000 isn't particularly exciting or broad and going forward what can you mount your lenses on?

A Nikon can work with the lenses dating back decades (1959 for some models) including some rather exceptional and exciting examples. You carry your collection forward when you upgrade.
JamesSmith

OK but you're buying into a lens system.You should buy the brand that … OK but you're buying into a lens system.You should buy the brand that carries the lens range you want.The Sony E-mount lens range for the A6000 isn't particularly exciting or broad and going forward what can you mount your lenses on? A Nikon can work with the lenses dating back decades (1959 for some models) including some rather exceptional and exciting examples. You carry your collection forward when you upgrade.



I mentioned Nikon's superior lens selection in my previous comment:


ElGofre

The Nikon lens lineup is a lot larger and more varied



Edited by: "ElGofre" 27th Jan 2016
amour3k

The OP's Deal?, or this one:Buy Nikon D5300 Digital SLR, Black, 24.2 Mega … The OP's Deal?, or this one:Buy Nikon D5300 Digital SLR, Black, 24.2 Mega Pixel, Wi-Fi, 18-55mm Lens from our SLR Camera range - Tescohttp://www.tesco.com/direct/nikon-d5300-digital-slr-black-242-mega-pixel-wi-fi-18-55mm-lens/401-5127.prd?pageLevel=&skuId=401-5127Someone earlier asked about if the Nikon D5200 had WiFi?, & somebody else responded it had neither WiFi or GPS, but for just under an extra £100, my above link has both .....Any thoughts on the above guys?, thanx. :-)



You need to make sure they supply vr2 lens not earlier dx vr1
amour3k

The OP's Deal?, or this one:Buy Nikon D5300 Digital SLR, Black, 24.2 Mega … The OP's Deal?, or this one:Buy Nikon D5300 Digital SLR, Black, 24.2 Mega Pixel, Wi-Fi, 18-55mm Lens from our SLR Camera range - Tescohttp://www.tesco.com/direct/nikon-d5300-digital-slr-black-242-mega-pixel-wi-fi-18-55mm-lens/401-5127.prd?pageLevel=&skuId=401-5127Someone earlier asked about if the Nikon D5200 had WiFi?, & somebody else responded it had neither WiFi or GPS, but for just under an extra £100, my above link has both .....Any thoughts on the above guys?, thanx. :-)



The differences are fairly minor in this iterative change, I wouldn't spend the extra £100 on it but each to their own. The top changes are:
*No AA filter on the sensor means a slight increase to achievable sharpness, but core sensor tech remains the same and the difference probably won't be visible with a kit lens.
*Newer processor grants an extra stop of native ISO (12,800 vs 6,400), although boosted ISO remains at 25,600
*Slightly larger and higher res display
*Slightly smaller and lighter
*Built in WiFi and GPS
TK42

You can buy the D5300 for £359 (body only), might be an option if you … You can buy the D5300 for £359 (body only), might be an option if you already have a lens. Heat added.



​ The 18-55mm VR II is an upgrade over the original VR, and the additional sharpness is supposedly worthwhile with 24 MP bodies.
ElGofre

Nikon have used Sony's sensors in their entry level cameras for a while, … Nikon have used Sony's sensors in their entry level cameras for a while, the sensor in the D5200 is most likely either a slightly older, slight variation or potentially an almost identical one to the A6000. Assuming similar quality lenses, image quality will be virtually the same, and as a beginner to the hobby, you are going to be a larger limitation on your image quality than your gear is!Simply put, you should be very happy with the image quality from either of these cameras


Thanks
ElGofre

Nikon have used Sony's sensors in their entry level cameras for a while, … Nikon have used Sony's sensors in their entry level cameras for a while, the sensor in the D5200 is most likely either a slightly older, slight variation or potentially an almost identical one to the A6000. Assuming similar quality lenses, image quality will be virtually the same, and as a beginner to the hobby, you are going to be a larger limitation on your image quality than your gear is!Simply put, you should be very happy with the image quality from either of these cameras


Very useful information

I'm on the lookout for a deal on A6000, prefer the smaller size and lack of lens choice is not a bother as would be happy with the kit lens
mikeyfive

Nice bit of kit, though the 5300 is markedly better (and markedly more … Nice bit of kit, though the 5300 is markedly better (and markedly more expensive). Really great price.



It's not though if you get it from HDEW, works out about £50 more or you can get a full kit with uv filter, bag , sd card for around £370. So it's a no brainer to spend the bit more and get that in my opinion.

hdewcameras.co.uk/nik…asp

hdewcameras.co.uk/nik…asp
Edited by: "fishmaster" 27th Jan 2016
TK42

You can buy the D5300 for £359 (body only), might be an option if you … You can buy the D5300 for £359 (body only), might be an option if you already have a lens. Heat added.



Nah get it from HDEW, they're legit , you'll get everything for £370. See the links I posted.
fishmaster

Nah get it from HDEW, they're legit , you'll get everything for £370. See … Nah get it from HDEW, they're legit , you'll get everything for £370. See the links I posted.


Grey Import though. No Nikon UK Warranty or support. Any repairs would have to be via the dealer and not necessarily be made by Nikon
TK42

Grey Import though. No Nikon UK Warranty or support. Any repairs would … Grey Import though. No Nikon UK Warranty or support. Any repairs would have to be via the dealer and not necessarily be made by Nikon



3 year warranty on the body. The dealer is decent.
fishmaster

3 year warranty on the body. The dealer is decent.


What about the lens? Who makes the repairs? How long does it take? Only asking as I have used Nikon, Fuji and Sony UK in the past with no problems but have no experience with Grey Imports.
TK42

What about the lens? Who makes the repairs? How long does it take? Only … What about the lens? Who makes the repairs? How long does it take? Only asking as I have used Nikon, Fuji and Sony UK in the past with no problems but have no experience with Grey Imports.



Buy it body only then for £345.
Only another £14 more for the same camera with a 2 year Nikon UK Warranty.
This is excellent price for excellent piece of kit. Definitely recommend it at this price point.
I'm a beginner so forgive me for the stupid question. I just bought Nikon D3300 and I'm not very happy about the zoom. If my daughter sits about 3 meters away from me, I can't take a close photo of her face because the camera doesn't zoom that much. Is it me or that's what te lens can do? (I had a nikon L840 before and I could take a very close and clear photo of the moon).
beckysdaddy1

You need to make sure they supply vr2 lens not earlier dx vr1



ElGofre

The differences are fairly minor in this iterative change, I wouldn't … The differences are fairly minor in this iterative change, I wouldn't spend the extra £100 on it but each to their own. The top changes are:*No AA filter on the sensor means a slight increase to achievable sharpness, but core sensor tech remains the same and the difference probably won't be visible with a kit lens.*Newer processor grants an extra stop of native ISO (12,800 vs 6,400), although boosted ISO remains at 25,600*Slightly larger and higher res display*Slightly smaller and lighter*Built in WiFi and GPS



Thanx, very useful Info. there you guys. :-)
fishmaster

3 year warranty on the body. The dealer is decent.



TK42

Only another £14 more for the same camera with a 2 year Nikon UK Warranty.



Amen to that BETTER 'price point!', thanx.

Never heard of that preferred Retailer called HDEW mind?, but I'm assuming they're good Company?.

(I've heard both good, & not so good inputs on Grey Imports, don't think I've gone down that route myself before mind?, but am happy to reserve judgment & keeping my mind open ... )
szippancs

I'm a beginner so forgive me for the stupid question. I just bought Nikon … I'm a beginner so forgive me for the stupid question. I just bought Nikon D3300 and I'm not very happy about the zoom. If my daughter sits about 3 meters away from me, I can't take a close photo of her face because the camera doesn't zoom that much. Is it me or that's what te lens can do? (I had a nikon L840 before and I could take a very close and clear photo of the moon).


18-55mm kit lens is basically equivalent to 3x zoom in your old camera
yeah it doesn't zoom as far but what you can see should be much much higher quality
want more zoom you need to buy different lens
amour3k

Amen to that BETTER 'price point!', thanx.Never heard of that preferred … Amen to that BETTER 'price point!', thanx.Never heard of that preferred Retailer called HDEW mind?, but I'm assuming they're good Company?.(I've heard both good, & not so good inputs on Grey Imports, don't think I've gone down that route myself before mind?, but am happy to reserve judgment & keeping my mind open ... )



I'm not associated with HDEW, I know a couple of professional photographers that have bought from them and had excellent service and one faulty lens changed. So that's where I'll be getting the D5300 from when I get one.
Edited by: "fishmaster" 27th Jan 2016
szippancs

I'm a beginner so forgive me for the stupid question. I just bought Nikon … I'm a beginner so forgive me for the stupid question. I just bought Nikon D3300 and I'm not very happy about the zoom. If my daughter sits about 3 meters away from me, I can't take a close photo of her face because the camera doesn't zoom that much. Is it me or that's what te lens can do? (I had a nikon L840 before and I could take a very close and clear photo of the moon).



If you want more zoom you need a zoom lens look at 55-200mm VR or 70-300mm VR Nikon lenses. Zoom isn't as cheap on DSLR because the sensor size is bigger than a compact camera, and in fact can cost thousands, the lenses I've mentioned above are for the more budget conscious but will do the job you want.

Here's a quick example >

amazon.co.uk/Nik…_ce



Edited by: "fishmaster" 27th Jan 2016
brilly

18-55mm kit lens is basically equivalent to 3x zoom in your old … 18-55mm kit lens is basically equivalent to 3x zoom in your old camerayeah it doesn't zoom as far but what you can see should be much much higher qualitywant more zoom you need to buy different lens


Yes, it takes beautifull pictures but this lens won't be good on an african safari.:/
fishmaster

If you want more zoom you need a zoom lens look at 55-200mm VR or … If you want more zoom you need a zoom lens look at 55-200mm VR or 70-300mm VR Nikon lenses. Zoom isn't as cheap on DSLR because the sensor size is bigger than a compact camera, and in fact can cost thousands, the lenses I've mentioned above are for the more budget conscious but will do the job you want. Here's a quick example >http://www.amazon.co.uk/Nikon-55-200MM-4-5-6-AF-S-Black-Lens/dp/B000O161X0


Thank you. It's more than I can affored on a lens.
szippancs

Yes, it takes beautifull pictures but this lens won't be good on an … Yes, it takes beautifull pictures but this lens won't be good on an african safari.:/


no you could stand 1 metre away from lions etc and you'll get some exciting pics X)
for safari you need a lens with longer reach (the mm number)
max zoom on your old camera is about 570mm on this one, but as the quality is higher at each focal distance you can probably get as good pics with a 200/300mm (guessing)
Edited by: "brilly" 27th Jan 2016
szippancs

I'm a beginner so forgive me for the stupid question. I just bought Nikon … I'm a beginner so forgive me for the stupid question. I just bought Nikon D3300 and I'm not very happy about the zoom. If my daughter sits about 3 meters away from me, I can't take a close photo of her face because the camera doesn't zoom that much. Is it me or that's what te lens can do? (I had a nikon L840 before and I could take a very close and clear photo of the moon).



This is going to be a long response explaining exactly what's going on, but the short answer is that it's not a problem with the camera, but a perceived problem with the lens you are using at the time.

For a bit of background, DSLR image quality is largely attributed to the fact that they have very large sensors, many times larger than the ones used in less expensive cameras. For reference, if you click here you'll see a pentax camera with the same size sensor as your old L840, with the sensor being the part with the blue outline, while on the right is a Sony camera with the same sized sensor as your D3300, with the blue square being the sensor. As you can see the size difference is massive.

Unsurprisingly, lens size generally goes hand in hand with sensor size. Because only tiny pieces of glass (known as "elements") are required to cover the tiny sensors of cheaper cameras with a full imaging circle, lens designers can either make the lenses very small, or compromise varying amounts of size in exchange for providing larger amounts of magnification. These lenses are also usually permanently affixed which allows them to be smaller still, while DSLR system lenses have to accommodate for being removable. This is why your D3300 with (I am assuming) 18-55mm lens has a significantly shorter zoom range while being physically larger. In fact, while it's very common to see cheap cameras offering lenses with magnifications of 30x or higher, these sorts of ranges virtually do not exist for DSLRs, as they would be enormous and expensive. The largest zoom ranges on a consumer lens are typically 18-300mm, which translates to about 16.6x zoom.

Anyway, for a solution to your problem of not having enough reach. There are three main ways to go really:

1. Buy a lens with a larger maximum focal length. If you are using an 18-55mm lens, compared to your old L840 it equates to being a 3x zoom lens (zoom range can be calculated by dividing the largest focal length by the smaller, so 55mm divided by 18 mm equals 3.05). Buying something like a Nikon 55-200mm lens gives you the equivalent of over 11x zoom spread across the two lenses (200mm over 18mm equals 11.111r), while the Nikon 55-300 gets you 16x across both lenses as mentioned previously (there are also a lot of cheaper 75-300mm lenses, which are rubbish quality). It still does not match what you will be used to coming from point & shoot quality cameras, but 95% of DSLR users work within lenses of this focal length for the vast majority of their shooting. A Nikon 55-200mm lens can be gotten for as little as £110 on Amazon right now. Alternatively if you don't want to deal with two different lenses for different tasks, look into the 18-300mm lenses from Nikon, Tamron and Sigma, although they're a lot more expensive.

2. Crop the photos down in an editing program. Your 24MP Nikon camera captures a huge amount of detail at a really high resolution, and for the vast majority of uses this provides more than a little legroom for cutting the photo down in size to make your subject the larger focus. For reference, a 4K display has approximately the same resolution as an 8MP photo and a 1080p display has the resolution of a 2MP image (with minor differences because of the difference in aspect ratios). I was in Switzerland this week and using a 35mm lens that does not zoom, and was able to pull a very nice 6-7MP photo of a bear from a 24MP image since I obviously couldn't get closer to it! For anything reasonably close to the camera you can crop with no issues, although it becomes less ideal for enlarging things that only occupy a small amount of the frame.

3. Get closer! The phrase "zoom with your feet" is a common piece of advice for new photographers who realise the limitations of their kit lens, since it means not having to buy new lenses straight away and getting them thinking about the framing of their photos rather than just relying on the camera to get them closer to the shot they want. There are also technical advantages to this too, for example getting closer to the subject your focussing on reduces the effective depth of field of the image behind them, resulting in more of the blurred out background that people associate with "proper" photography. This is obviously of little use if moon shots or safaris are the sort of thing you want to do, however!

Hopefully my ramblings are of some use!
ElGofre

This is going to be a long response explaining exactly what's going on, … This is going to be a long response explaining exactly what's going on, but the short answer is that it's not a problem with the camera, but a perceived problem with the lens you are using at the time. For a bit of background, DSLR image quality is largely attributed to the fact that they have very large sensors, many times larger than the ones used in less expensive cameras. For reference, if you click here you'll see a pentax camera with the same size sensor as your old L840, with the sensor being the part with the blue outline, while on the right is a Sony camera with the same sized sensor as your D3300, with the blue square being the sensor. As you can see the size difference is massive.Unsurprisingly, lens size generally goes hand in hand with sensor size. Because only tiny pieces of glass (known as "elements") are required to cover the tiny sensors of cheaper cameras with a full imaging circle, lens designers can either make the lenses very small, or compromise varying amounts of size in exchange for providing larger amounts of magnification. These lenses are also usually permanently affixed which allows them to be smaller still, while DSLR system lenses have to accommodate for being removable. This is why your D3300 with (I am assuming) 18-55mm lens has a significantly shorter zoom range while being physically larger. In fact, while it's very common to see cheap cameras offering lenses with magnifications of 30x or higher, these sorts of ranges virtually do not exist for DSLRs, as they would be enormous and expensive. The largest zoom ranges on a consumer lens are typically 18-300mm, which translates to about 16.6x zoom.Anyway, for a solution to your problem of not having enough reach. There are three main ways to go really:1. Buy a lens with a larger maximum focal length. If you are using an 18-55mm lens, compared to your old L840 it equates to being a 3x zoom lens (zoom range can be calculated by dividing the largest focal length by the smaller, so 55mm divided by 18 mm equals 3.05). Buying something like a Nikon 55-200mm lens gives you the equivalent of over 11x zoom spread across the two lenses (200mm over 18mm equals 11.111r), while the Nikon 55-300 gets you 16x across both lenses as mentioned previously (there are also a lot of cheaper 75-300mm lenses, which are rubbish quality). It still does not match what you will be used to coming from point & shoot quality cameras, but 95% of DSLR users work within lenses of this focal length for the vast majority of their shooting. A Nikon 55-200mm lens can be gotten for as little as £110 on Amazon right now. Alternatively if you don't want to deal with two different lenses for different tasks, look into the 18-300mm lenses from Nikon, Tamron and Sigma, although they're a lot more expensive.2. Crop the photos down in an editing program. Your 24MP Nikon camera captures a huge amount of detail at a really high resolution, and for the vast majority of uses this provides more than a little legroom for cutting the photo down in size to make your subject the larger focus. For reference, a 4K display has approximately the same resolution as an 8MP photo and a 1080p display has the resolution of a 2MP image (with minor differences because of the difference in aspect ratios). I was in Switzerland this week and using a 35mm lens that does not zoom, and was able to pull a very nice 6-7MP photo of a bear from a 24MP image since I obviously couldn't get closer to it! For anything reasonably close to the camera you can crop with no issues, although it becomes less ideal for enlarging things that only occupy a small amount of the frame.3. Get closer! The phrase "zoom with your feet" is a common piece of advice for new photographers who realise the limitations of their kit lens, since it means not having to buy new lenses straight away and getting them thinking about the framing of their photos rather than just relying on the camera to get them closer to the shot they want. There are also technical advantages to this too, for example getting closer to the subject your focussing on reduces the effective depth of field of the image behind them, resulting in more of the blurred out background that people associate with "proper" photography. This is obviously of little use if moon shots or safaris are the sort of thing you want to do, however!Hopefully my ramblings are of some use!


Thank you so much. You helped a lot. Because I'm going to use the camera on holidays and some occasions I won't buy a new lens. I'll go for the other 2 options.:) Thank you!
Thanks ElGofre

You should write a blog with such useful information
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