Body Sculpture Kettlebells all half price at Sainsburys (2.5kg, 5kg, 7.5kg and 8kg) From £4.99 - Instore (seen with stock at Walthamstow) and online
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Body Sculpture Kettlebells all half price at Sainsburys (2.5kg, 5kg, 7.5kg and 8kg) From £4.99 - Instore (seen with stock at Walthamstow) and online

39
Found 2nd Jan 2012
On my annual trip to the gym, in return for 12 months of subs, my personal trainer would always bang on about these. Something about working two muscle groups or something.

Anyway, I have just bought two 7.5kg kettlebells in an attractive grey, from Walthamstow Sainsburys (probably to use as doorstops).

Online is:
2.5kg for £4.99
5.0kg for £6.49 and
8.0kg for £11.99

Instore (Walthamstow) also had £7.5kg at £8.99.

Blurb says:
Ideal for building strength and getting a cardio workout, the Body Sculpture 2.5kg Kettlebell is a great way to get fit.

Completely versatile, it's suitable for many different exercises to tone all the different areas of the body. It's vinyl coated for comfort and durability too.

Ideal for use at home or in a gym class, it also features a wide, comfortable grip to help with controlled movement.

I did search for kettlebells and did not see anything. Apologies if it is listed under something else.
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39 Comments
Original Poster
I shopuld stress that the attractivess of the grey was relevant only to its use as a doorstop!
Aldi will be selling these soon also.
2.5kg
Price: £4.99

5kg
Price: £6.99

7.5kg
Price: £8.99
these are just for women. men need 16-24kg

Way too light for a bloke. Would like to see you swing a 24kg bell though! Lol

phillyboy

these are just for women. men need 16-24kg


Have heat OP, good find, great for Cario,,,,,,even cardio w/outs
we picked up an 8kg a couple of days ago and this is a great weight to share with your other half
Original Poster

Perfect doorstops though or high reps

phillyboy

these are just for women. men need 16-24kg


worth the weight
Low weight plus high reps = weight loss and price is good if you want something to use while watching the telly etc.
May be worth visiting this recent thread for some advice/comments/fun:
Aldi Kettle Bell
Edited by: "Chippa" 4th Jan 2012
Banned
I've got a 10kg kettle bell end
Murielson

Low weight plus high reps = weight loss and price is good if you want … Low weight plus high reps = weight loss and price is good if you want something to use while watching the telly etc.



Couldn't be further from the truth. Higher reps stimulate fast twitch muscle fibre rather than the slow twitch muscle fibre in low reps. Weight loss is determined by diet and a so a calorie deficit. You can increase the excess calorie burn by weights of course (in any rep range) and naturally cardio.
I'm from walthamstow also haha.. thought it was just me on here.. I really want some Kettlebells.. I work at a gym and one of the PT's swears by them.. but he has much heavier ones.
Not very heavy, but good for grabbing and running up and down the stairs with, good cardio
Only 5Kg left in stock at Fosse Park Leics
Murielson

Low weight plus high reps = weight loss and price is good if you want … Low weight plus high reps = weight loss and price is good if you want something to use while watching the telly etc.


Not true. Calories used > Calories consumed = Weight loss
Sorry to all the experts - I meant that if you use smaller weights for long periods and combine this with a calorie controlled diet, the small weights can be very useful. I have a 16kg kettle that gets used occasionally for variation. Plenty of different exercises available on youtube etc if people need further info before they buy.

Bought 2 x 2.5kg for my daughter to use, several left in main Andover Sainsburys.
weights are waaay too low. unless being used by a pensioner, or child.
i started on 16kgs getting my form. and gf started on 12kgs. i cannot see any use for anything lower. just a waste of money.
but as the fitness industry goes. make a weight too low to be effective. slap some pink on it. and the clueless women will flock to it.
I do lots of reps with a low weight and see great results i use about a 40g weight. I find a mars bar works great or if you want a tough workout a mars duo bar. Plus after the first lift it seems to get lighter. One problem i have found though is that after about ten sets i do start to feel a bit sick. nomonomonomom.
Banned
Hot! x
depends on what way you're using them
if it's part of a cardio regime where you're going to be doing a decent amount of reps, a 7.5kg might be okay
if you're working towards those 24 inch pythons, then I'd say go for 20kg+
Edited by: "thegroutch" 4th Jan 2012
Original Poster
Given that I have a standing start, or rather a lying on the sofa start, I am happy to start with high reps (at least 5 or 6) with the 7.5kgs I picked up in-store.
I use low weights to fatigue the muscles before using the heavier free weights on the bench to build.

It's all about balance. If you lift only high weights at low reps all you'll do is increase the size without any real strength to speak of.
Edited by: "Saintledger" 4th Jan 2012
All of this "advice" on these threads is a little tiring, and I have bit my tongue tongue on numerous occasions.

There are lots of different "methods" to increase strength (maintain muscle in my case) and the internet is full of them. People could argue all day about low reps/high reps/ multiple sets/ cadence etc, but I guess people can choose to follow which method they choose to. Personally I follow 1 set to failure (target about 8 reps) progressively increasing the weight when I beat 8 reps. And I guess 90% of people have no idea what failure is.

Anyway, I bet there are very few people on here who are disciplined enough (I don't include myself in that) to workout consisently, properly (whichever method they choose to follow) and follow a good clean diet (deficit or increase depending on your goals) with little/no alcohol.

But if it gets your heart rate up , then why not
Normuk

All of this "advice" on these threads is a little tiring, and I have bit … All of this "advice" on these threads is a little tiring, and I have bit my tongue tongue on numerous occasions.There are lots of different "methods" to increase strength (maintain muscle in my case) and the internet is full of them. People could argue all day about low reps/high reps/ multiple sets/ cadence etc, but I guess people can choose to follow which method they choose to. Personally I follow 1 set to failure (target about 8 reps) progressively increasing the weight when I beat 8 reps. And I guess 90% of people have no idea what failure is.Anyway, I bet there are very few people on here who are disciplined enough (I don't include myself in that) to workout consisently, properly (whichever method they choose to follow) and follow a good clean diet (deficit or increase depending on your goals) with little/no alcohol.But if it gets your heart rate up , then why not


Agreed. There is a lot of misinformation, generalisation and tunnel vision in the responses to all these threads on fitness equipment. Of course the weights on offer here will be too light for some users and for certain uses, but they are perfectly acceptable for others. Somebody above referred to a kettlebell swing as though that's the only exercise you can perform with them. I know of at least two different exercises my instructor integrated into my regime where I started at 5kg and progressed over a month to 8kg; and I am a bloke! Granted, it has not transformed me into an Arnie lookalike, but it has served my needs.

We are voting on whether this is a good price for the product; not on whether it would suit your particular exercise routine.
Normuk

All of this "advice" on these threads is a little tiring, and I have bit … All of this "advice" on these threads is a little tiring, and I have bit my tongue tongue on numerous occasions.There are lots of different "methods" to increase strength (maintain muscle in my case) and the internet is full of them. People could argue all day about low reps/high reps/ multiple sets/ cadence etc, but I guess people can choose to follow which method they choose to. Personally I follow 1 set to failure (target about 8 reps) progressively increasing the weight when I beat 8 reps. And I guess 90% of people have no idea what failure is.Anyway, I bet there are very few people on here who are disciplined enough (I don't include myself in that) to workout consisently, properly (whichever method they choose to follow) and follow a good clean diet (deficit or increase depending on your goals) with little/no alcohol.But if it gets your heart rate up , then why not



Training to failure regularly is a mug's game. Train until you can do one last full rep without breaking your form - this is usually 1 rep before failure but it can take a while to learn your limits.

Training to failure commonly, and over a long period of time is asking for injuries.
Normuk

All of this "advice" on these threads is a little tiring, and I have bit … All of this "advice" on these threads is a little tiring, and I have bit my tongue tongue on numerous occasions.There are lots of different "methods" to increase strength (maintain muscle in my case) and the internet is full of them. People could argue all day about low reps/high reps/ multiple sets/ cadence etc, but I guess people can choose to follow which method they choose to. Personally I follow 1 set to failure (target about 8 reps) progressively increasing the weight when I beat 8 reps. And I guess 90% of people have no idea what failure is.Anyway, I bet there are very few people on here who are disciplined enough (I don't include myself in that) to workout consisently, properly (whichever method they choose to follow) and follow a good clean diet (deficit or increase depending on your goals) with little/no alcohol.But if it gets your heart rate up , then why not




You do realise after your critic you did round it up by telling us what you like to do ..

I guess we all can't help ourselves!
Murielson

Low weight plus high reps = weight loss and price is good if you want … Low weight plus high reps = weight loss and price is good if you want something to use while watching the telly etc.

Saintledger

I use low weights to fatigue the muscles before using the heavier free … I use low weights to fatigue the muscles before using the heavier free weights on the bench to build.It's all about balance. If you lift only high weights at low reps all you'll do is increase the size without any real strength to speak of.


Rubbish. That is completely backwards.

Low reps (say 1-3) with heavy weight stimulates fast twitch (think olympic weight lifter, sprinter).
More reps (say 10-20) with lower weight stimulates slow twitch muscles and usually people have more of these so this is the most effective way of bulking up.
High reps (20+) won't be effective to build muscle but will build endurance and burn a lot of calories.

Obviously this is a continuum, so you won't suddenly switch from one type to another on a magic boundary.


Again, this is completely backwards. High weights at low reps is precisely how to build strength. Sets of 1-3 reps at 80%+ of your one rep max is a recognised method used by olympic lifters and power lifters.

Not sure I would recommend fatiguing first either, especially not for strength, but maybe it works for you.

Regarding the bloke who trains to failure. Training to failure is not a good way of building strength. It's a recognised body-building technique though.
That's exactly what i define as failure manners.

Sometimes my last rep can take 30 seconds but good form!
Failure is pain not failing is generally because you think your done
Edited by: "Normuk" 4th Jan 2012
Saintledger

You do realise after your critic you did round it up by telling us what … You do realise after your critic you did round it up by telling us what you like to do .. I guess we all can't help ourselves!



Saintledger

True ! I was just saying the method i follow i wasn't telling anyone … True ! I was just saying the method i follow i wasn't telling anyone what they should do !;-)You do realisedid after your critic you did round it up by telling us what you like to do .. I guess we all can't help ourselves!


alasrati

Again, this is completely backwards. High weights at low reps is … Again, this is completely backwards. High weights at low reps is precisely how to build strength. Sets of 1-3 reps at 80%+ of your one rep max is a recognised method used by olympic lifters and power lifters.Not sure I would recommend fatiguing first either, especially not for strength, but maybe it works for you.Regarding the bloke who trains to failure. Training to failure is not a good way of building strength. It's a recognised body-building technique though.



I fatigue the muscles to increase endurance, which is part of a balanced weight lifting program, just as the high reps/light weight are, all aimed at gaining strength without bulking up.

Weight lifters don't have a veto on how best to build strength. Gymnasts, boxers and wrestlers all have phenomenal strength without increasing their mass. Take a bantam weight boxer, and look at his/her strength next to their muscle size.

There's more than one way to build weight and while i accept you can gain strength by lifting high weights at low weights, doing that alone is far from the own way let alone the best.

And yes as a runner I find this works fine for me thanks
Normuk

That's exactly what i define as failure manners.Sometimes my last rep can … That's exactly what i define as failure manners.Sometimes my last rep can take 30 seconds but good form!Failure is pain not failing is generally because you think your done



Sorry don't follow? Did my post offend you? Was far from my intention.
Saintledger

Weight lifters don't have a veto on how best to build strength. … Weight lifters don't have a veto on how best to build strength. Gymnasts, boxers and wrestlers all have phenomenal strength without increasing their mass. Take a bantam weight boxer, and look at his/her strength next to their muscle size.There's more than one way to build weight and while i accept you can gain strength by lifting high weights at low weights, doing that alone is far from the own way let alone the best.

I would say it is the best and that high rep training is terrible in comparison for strength.

I am pretty sure that competitive world-class weightlifters use the best training methods to improve strength. You specifically said "If you lift only high weights at low reps all you'll do is increase the size without any real strength to speak of." This is just wrong. Watch some training videos of olympic weightlifters or look at their training programs. They do singles or doubles with huge rest periods between sets.
alasrati

I would say it is the best and that high rep training is terrible in … I would say it is the best and that high rep training is terrible in comparison for strength.I am pretty sure that competitive world-class weightlifters use the best training methods to improve strength. You specifically said "If you lift only high weights at low reps all you'll do is increase the size without any real strength to speak of." This is just wrong. Watch some training videos of olympic weightlifters or look at their training programs. They do singles or doubles with huge rest periods between sets.



You're right, I was wrong to say 'without any real strength.' But i did use the words 'when that's all you do,' However apologies and I do stand corrected however I stand by my post.

Weight lifters lift weights to gain strength to lift a bar with weights over their head. Gymnasts need amazing strength to operate on the rings and balance bar etc. A banton/feather weight boxer has to be able to punch with huge force without increasing their muscle size, the same with a wrestler.

Not all Olympians follow the same weights programme, or do you think athletes like gymnasts, wrestlers and boxers in lighter weight divisions are unable to gain strength without compromising their mass? This was my point.
Banned
zekespah

I've got a 10kg kettle bell end



Plenty of (Kettle) bell ends on here. My God, don't they drone on.
Saintledger

You do realise after your critic you did round it up by telling us what … You do realise after your critic you did round it up by telling us what you like to do .. I guess we all can't help ourselves!




Yeah, sorry mate my post didn't work last night, it was on my phone.

What i meant to say was...
True ! I was just saying the method i follow i wasn't telling anyone what they should do !;-)
OH managed to bag a 5kg from local sainsburys I think its heavy enough for my needs for quite a while.

Also recently got some Bodylastics resistance bands, amazon- which I recommend for anyone who hasn't got the time or money to go to a gym or afford a gym at home

I did a kettle bell class and used a 4kg bell and I found it really hard. Never done it before. I had muscle ache afterwards for 5 days. I am female. I have bought a 2.5kg to use next time until I get used to it. So I don't think the low weights are no use, checked with my instructors who agree 4kg was to much too soon for me.
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