Bosch WTW863S1GB A++ 7kg Load Capacity Self Cleaning Heat Pump Condenser Tumble Dryer £374 at Hughes
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Bosch WTW863S1GB A++ 7kg Load Capacity Self Cleaning Heat Pump Condenser Tumble Dryer £374 at Hughes

15
Found 19th Jan
Price Matched at John Lewis.
Used this price and the Hughes January offer of £25 off orders over £300 to get this for £374 from John Lewis.

Very good price for a Bosch Heat Pump dryer. Was £440 in John Lewis and they were happy to match the discounted Hughes price.

Hughes has none in stock online for delivery, and one in store at Southend (which is a 3 hour drive from me) and JL still matched it. Better warranty from John Lewis too.

While I know they're no bench-mark these are on sale in Curry's for nearly £700.
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15 Comments
Cant beat a bosch
Mech651 m ago

Cant beat a bosch


Miele
It's worth remembering with these Heat Pump dryers that they take about 3 hours to dry a load, vs 2 hrs for a regular dryer. They use considerably less energy, but take longer and have a considerably higher purchase price. It's worth establishing how much you use your dryer and when before buying. It's also worth noting with this specific model that people have had issues with it's drying and the general solution is to change the 'fine settings'; which emcompasses turning the heat level up to it's highest setting, so do no expect to get as low energy use as the figures suggest if you've done that.

I can't argue with the price though.
Self cleaning? I want it to clean my clothes!!
I had a AEG heat pump dryer, never again. Poor performance, emited lots of moisture in the room it was in and blower motor (sealed bearings) failed just outside warranty which would have cost more to replace than a vented dryer costs,even fitting it myself. I might look again at high tech drying when ultrasonic dryers come to market but wouldn't spend money on heat pump technology.
Scorpion1 h, 24 m ago

It's worth remembering with these Heat Pump dryers that they take about 3 …It's worth remembering with these Heat Pump dryers that they take about 3 hours to dry a load, vs 2 hrs for a regular dryer. They use considerably less energy, but take longer and have a considerably higher purchase price. It's worth establishing how much you use your dryer and when before buying. It's also worth noting with this specific model that people have had issues with it's drying and the general solution is to change the 'fine settings'; which emcompasses turning the heat level up to it's highest setting, so do no expect to get as low energy use as the figures suggest if you've done that.I can't argue with the price though.


The Bosch WTW86560GB I bought 6 years ago uses a heat pump, and dries in just over 2 hours (using the "cotton, cupboard dry" programme), assuming a 1400 RPM spin. It's also still working fine, with no defects, or service required since purchase.
Scorpion19th Jan

It's worth remembering with these Heat Pump dryers that they take about 3 …It's worth remembering with these Heat Pump dryers that they take about 3 hours to dry a load, vs 2 hrs for a regular dryer. They use considerably less energy, but take longer and have a considerably higher purchase price. It's worth establishing how much you use your dryer and when before buying. It's also worth noting with this specific model that people have had issues with it's drying and the general solution is to change the 'fine settings'; which emcompasses turning the heat level up to it's highest setting, so do no expect to get as low energy use as the figures suggest if you've done that.I can't argue with the price though.




Have to disagree

I have the model above this one(all touch controls) and it dries quicker than my old condenser.

It's never going to be as quick as a vented dryer but I can dry a full load of towels (around 5 kg dry weight when loaded into washer) that have been run at 1400 spin in 1.5 hours.

Never had issues with drying either as long as you select correctly how you want it drying, i.e. cupboard or iron dry will obviously give differing results.
Only issue I can highlight is it's not reverse action so you have to watch that bedding doesn't get wrapped up into a ball meaning it won't dry correctly. I find loading the items into the dryer separately resolves this issue 90% of the time.

Overall it's great. I've plumbed mine into the drain pipe too so literally just have to empty the lint filter.

My electric bill has reduced too as I dry literally everything in dryer.
gazdoubleu1 h, 57 m ago

I had a AEG heat pump dryer, never again. Poor performance, emited lots of …I had a AEG heat pump dryer, never again. Poor performance, emited lots of moisture in the room it was in and blower motor (sealed bearings) failed just outside warranty which would have cost more to replace than a vented dryer costs,even fitting it myself. I might look again at high tech drying when ultrasonic dryers come to market but wouldn't spend money on heat pump technology.


Your experience doesn't match my experience at all, in fact sounds nothing like using a heat pump dryer.

I am using my second AEG manufactured Heat pump dryer, this one is John Lewis labelled and has had a problem, but even so, it beats conventional dryers into the ground - AEG and their appalling service network is the problem, not the technology, the repairs eventually done were actually very simple, unfortunately the staff were much more simple, and took 10 weeks to do it! - however the first one did 6.5 years without any problems at all and saved an absolute fortune, the calculations I did before I bought it meant it only had to last 3.5 years (and had a 5 year warranty) before I was "into profit" although the cost of both electricity and driers is higher now, the numbers will still work if you mainly use a dryer as I do (I am disabled and couldn't hang a load of washing on the line even if I wanted to) - mine dries an 8kg load in notionally 1hr 39 minutes, but depending on the material in there it can be a bit less, only heavy towels tend to take the full program length. There are settings which take longer but I don't need to dry clothes to the point they feel baked! Of course you have to change the settings to meet the dryness of your washing machine eg, the spin speed - if they come out wet any form of drying will take longer than if they come out less wet, and that applies to hanging them on the line too. The setup on my dryer is easy to do.

I don't think I would buy one of any make without extra warranty as the cost of repairing white goods is totally crazy, but that applies to any make, just that I won't buy AEG products again due to the useless service network whose reviews read like horror novel
honeymonster862 h, 6 m ago

Self cleaning? I want it to clean my clothes!!


You're probably best buying a washing machine for that.
cowbutt1 h, 45 m ago

The Bosch WTW86560GB I bought 6 years ago uses a heat pump, and dries in …The Bosch WTW86560GB I bought 6 years ago uses a heat pump, and dries in just over 2 hours (using the "cotton, cupboard dry" programme), assuming a 1400 RPM spin. It's also still working fine, with no defects, or service required since purchase.


Bosch quote 178mins to dry a load. A typical vented dryer is about 120mins.
There are a lot of myths and confusion around this stuff. As others have suggested, the most important thing about drying is ensuring clothes have had a good spin first - a lot of A+++ washers still only have a B rated spin! Give them a good spin and clothes take no time to dry at all, ours often dry quicker than they wash - assuming you're using an eco wash programme.

Everybody is always in a rush, just SLOW DOWN! How much washing do you do? How quick does it need to be?

Every evening, sort our a laundry load and put it in your washer on a long, slow, eco programme. Start it just before you go to bed. Wake up to clean damp clothes and pop them in the dryer. Come home to dry clothes.

Why are people hanging around waiting for stuff to dry? Just get on with your life.
I had a basic Bosch tumble dryer for 15 years and I changed the heating element once - brilliant machine.
I upgraded to a Bosch condenser and had nothing but problems over a three year period. After spending out changing various sensors following advice from their technical support, I decided to cut my losses trying to fix and purchased a basic white knight tumble dryer. 3 years on the white knight is going strong.

I may have been unlucky but Bosch quality is not what it use to be.
Scorpion6 h, 37 m ago

Bosch quote 178mins to dry a load. A typical vented dryer is about 120mins.


My dryer has moisture sensors, so the exact time will depend on how wet the load is, and how much there is of it. All I can say is that 130 mins is the standard time for a "cotton, cupboard dry" programme, with the spin speed setting configured to match that of my washing machine.
ro53ben3 h, 37 m ago

There are a lot of myths and confusion around this stuff. As others have …There are a lot of myths and confusion around this stuff. As others have suggested, the most important thing about drying is ensuring clothes have had a good spin first - a lot of A+++ washers still only have a B rated spin! Give them a good spin and clothes take no time to dry at all, ours often dry quicker than they wash - assuming you're using an eco wash programme.Everybody is always in a rush, just SLOW DOWN! How much washing do you do? How quick does it need to be?Every evening, sort our a laundry load and put it in your washer on a long, slow, eco programme. Start it just before you go to bed. Wake up to clean damp clothes and pop them in the dryer. Come home to dry clothes.Why are people hanging around waiting for stuff to dry? Just get on with your life.


If I had a utility room 2 blocks away I might be happy do that, but listening to a washing machine for better part of 4 hours is not my idea of entertainment! My current A+++ washer also uses a god bit more energy than my old one- I was surprised when I compared the full spec!
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