Brand New Apple iPhone 6S 64GB Unlocked Grey - £489.99 - Smartfonestore
337°Expired

Brand New Apple iPhone 6S 64GB Unlocked Grey - £489.99 - Smartfonestore

25
Found 6th Jul 2016
Accessories:
Ships complete with original accessories.
Warranty & Returns:
We provide a free 10 day no quibble returns service as long as the handset is returned unopened. Brand New items ship with a minimum 1 year manufacturer warranty from the day of activation which is claimable via the manufacturer themselves. Some manufacturers may offer up to 2 years. Please see manufacturers website for details.
Delivery:
Typically, orders placed before 12 noon on a working day are shipped by Royal Mail Special Delivery the same day for guaranteed delivery the following working day before 1pm. Delivery times vary for large orders and busy periods.
Packaging:
Ships in original sealed packaging in a silver Royal Mail Special Delivery pouch.
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25 Comments
Bargin
rokesh

.Warranty & Returns:We provide a free 10 day no quibble returns service … .Warranty & Returns:We provide a free 10 day no quibble returns service as long as the handset is returned unopened. Brand New items ship with a minimum 1 year manufacturer warranty from the day of activation which is claimable via the manufacturer themselves.



so a total disregard to your statutory rights under the 'Consumer Contracts Regulations' I'd stay away from retailers who think they're above the law.
Edited by: "paulj48" 7th Jul 2016
New appears to be in grey only. Seems suspiciously cheap...?
Very suspicious
6ixFoot1

Very suspicious



Suspicious at what? Don't forget the phones these sell are ones that have been recycled at fonebank as same company and someone probably cashed in a new sealed one to save hassle if cash wanted quickly etc.
Great deal
paulj48

so a total disregard to your statutory rights under the 'Consumer Rights … so a total disregard to your statutory rights under the 'Consumer Rights Act' I'd stay away from retailers who think they're above the law.



Could you elaborate please?
jimbo001

Could you elaborate please?


The law says you can open and inspect the product and if you don't want it send it back for a full refund within 14 days. Retailer is saying otherwise.
It's not suspicious folks, it's that usual time when Apple start to flood the market with outgoing models at lower prices from selected retailers, will happen over the next 2-3 months similar phones will be around this price from various retailers. This time last year I recall John Lewis had a big batch too.
OOS
paulj48

The law says you can open and inspect the product and if you don't want … The law says you can open and inspect the product and if you don't want it send it back for a full refund within 14 days. Retailer is saying otherwise.



This is also a slightly liberal interpretation of the law. It would actually depend on why you were returning the item. The 30 day return period (not 14) is the time in which the consumer can exercise their short-term right to reject the goods. You are correct in saying that for this, it is irrelevant that the item has been opened. BUT, that right exists in relation to the goods being faulty, or not as described, or not of satisfactory quality, or as not matching a sample provided etc etc. To exercise the right, your item must therefore fall within one of the defined reasons for rejecting the goods. You are not afforded those rights in situations where you simply changed your mind about the product. It is in those situations where some retailers therefore offer you additional rights, e.g. those which offer a 'no quibble' return policy within 10 days.

The law seeks to protect consumers from faulty or fraudulent goods ONLY.
Definitely hot,but expired now.
I've purchased all my phones from these guys. They are excellent. I've had to return just 1 of the phones I've bought as the battery life was rather poor. BUT, their returns are easy (and free). They do charge for delivery so bare that in mind. Plus £5.05 top cash back - which sort of pays for the delivery charge. (Might have changed as last time I ordered a phone was a month ago)
been following these on amazon and seen them "like new" for £295 so this doesn't seem cheap
daniielnayylor

been following these on amazon and seen them "like new" for £295 so this … been following these on amazon and seen them "like new" for £295 so this doesn't seem cheap



I highly doubt that. For an iPhone 6S ? 64GB? Link?
williamj1

This is also a slightly liberal interpretation of the law. It would … This is also a slightly liberal interpretation of the law. It would actually depend on why you were returning the item. The 30 day return period (not 14) is the time in which the consumer can exercise their short-term right to reject the goods. You are correct in saying that for this, it is irrelevant that the item has been opened. BUT, that right exists in relation to the goods being faulty, or not as described, or not of satisfactory quality, or as not matching a sample provided etc etc. To exercise the right, your item must therefore fall within one of the defined reasons for rejecting the goods. You are not afforded those rights in situations where you simply changed your mind about the product. It is in those situations where some retailers therefore offer you additional rights, e.g. those which offer a 'no quibble' return policy within 10 days. The law seeks to protect consumers from faulty or fraudulent goods ONLY.



Totally incorrect for items bought over the phone or on the Internet, the above is for products bought in a shop. If you buy online you can return it upto 14 days after you have handled it, have a read of the Consumer Contracts Regulations (that replace the distance selling regulations)
which.co.uk/con…ons
williamj1

This is also a slightly liberal interpretation of the law. It would … This is also a slightly liberal interpretation of the law. It would actually depend on why you were returning the item. The 30 day return period (not 14) is the time in which the consumer can exercise their short-term right to reject the goods. You are correct in saying that for this, it is irrelevant that the item has been opened. BUT, that right exists in relation to the goods being faulty, or not as described, or not of satisfactory quality, or as not matching a sample provided etc etc. To exercise the right, your item must therefore fall within one of the defined reasons for rejecting the goods. You are not afforded those rights in situations where you simply changed your mind about the product. It is in those situations where some retailers therefore offer you additional rights, e.g. those which offer a 'no quibble' return policy within 10 days. The law seeks to protect consumers from faulty or fraudulent goods ONLY.



I thought the Consumer Contracts Regulations states you have 14 days to cancel, then 14 days to send back? And you can cancel for whatever reason you like. The only grey area I think is that "A deduction can be made if the value of the goods has been reduced as a result of you handling the goods more than was necessary." Ie opening the box. But then it goes on to say "The extent to which you can handle the goods is the same as it would be if you were assessing them in a shop." So its a bit grey I think.
paulj48

Totally incorrect for items bought over the phone or on the Internet, the … Totally incorrect for items bought over the phone or on the Internet, the above is for products bought in a shop. If you buy online you can return it upto 14 days after you have handled it, have a read of the Consumer Contracts Regulations (that replace the distance selling regulations)http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/consumer-contracts-regulations



Ah, beat me to it.
misa426

Bargin



Not really. Just cheaper than Apple's rip off / maximum profiteering, normal RRP!
misa426

Bargin


Yes, a bar is a good place to find gin.
Your prize? Two lemons.
Tequila

Definitely hot,but expired now.



williamj1

This is also a slightly liberal interpretation of the law. It would … This is also a slightly liberal interpretation of the law. It would actually depend on why you were returning the item. The 30 day return period (not 14) is the time in which the consumer can exercise their short-term right to reject the goods. You are correct in saying that for this, it is irrelevant that the item has been opened. BUT, that right exists in relation to the goods being faulty, or not as described, or not of satisfactory quality, or as not matching a sample provided etc etc. To exercise the right, your item must therefore fall within one of the defined reasons for rejecting the goods. You are not afforded those rights in situations where you simply changed your mind about the product. It is in those situations where some retailers therefore offer you additional rights, e.g. those which offer a 'no quibble' return policy within 10 days. The law seeks to protect consumers from faulty or fraudulent goods ONLY.


Your getting confused with Sale of goods act and Consumer Contracts Regulations
paulj48

Totally incorrect for items bought over the phone or on the Internet, the … Totally incorrect for items bought over the phone or on the Internet, the above is for products bought in a shop. If you buy online you can return it upto 14 days after you have handled it, have a read of the Consumer Contracts Regulations (that replace the distance selling regulations)http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/consumer-contracts-regulations



If they have told you of your rights in a durable medium - a website is not durable. If not you have 3 months + 7 days to cancel
benjai

Ah, beat me to it.


If they have told you of your right in a durable medium
Edited by: "zaax" 7th Jul 2016
Cheaper than a Samsung how the tables have turned!
back in stock, can someone unexpire?
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