44°
EXPIRED
Brand New Kia Cee'd 5 door, 7 year warranty, £11497! @ Kia - DUNFERMLINE
Brand New Kia Cee'd 5 door, 7 year warranty, £11497! @ Kia - DUNFERMLINE

Brand New Kia Cee'd 5 door, 7 year warranty, £11497! @ Kia - DUNFERMLINE

Buy forBuy forBuy for£11,497
GETGet dealVisit site and get deal
Kia Cee'd hatchback mid size family car, SR-7 spec

1.4 petrol so no need to worry about problems of a modern diesel

7 year warranty

lots of spec including air con

and Brand New

absolute bargain for a mid size family hatchback from a reliable manufacturer

see link for details

21 Comments

can pay nearly that over seven years just for a warranty on a used car! heat from me!!!

Original Poster

btw, this is the same size as a vw golf, Hyundai i10, Honda civic, Nissan pulsar, Vauxhall Astra, ford focus, etc

it's actually way bigger inside than the cramped ford focus

Original Poster

above post should read hyundai i30

Original Poster

joehart2

btw, this is the same size as a vw golf, Hyundai i10, Honda civic, Nissan … btw, this is the same size as a vw golf, Hyundai i10, Honda civic, Nissan pulsar, Vauxhall Astra, ford focus, etcit's actually way bigger inside than the cramped ford focus



​I30 not I10!

Looking good

"lots of spec including air con" - Looooool!

Also the post is a little misleading. You won't be able to buy it for £11,497 in cash. That is the price only if you take finance through them, so the true price is £12,719.82.

It does say from only £11,497 or from only £867..... and lower down cash price £11,497...

Original Poster

m5rcc

its £11,497.00 for cash

feel free to ring them

joehart2

m5rccits £11,497.00 for cashfeel free to ring them



I did - they had none in stock and the price of £11,497 is if you took finance, as suspected.

Original Poster

seems i was informed different!!

Good price & these are good cars. F&T in Dunfermline are not great though. They seem to think they are doing you a favour by 'allowing' you to buy one of their cars.

m5rcc

I did - they had none in stock and the price of £11,497 is if you took … I did - they had none in stock and the price of £11,497 is if you took finance, as suspected.




Why wouldn't you take finance just to get the incentive deposit contribution and then just settle up next day with the finance company and pay about £2 interest? When you ask for a cooling period (14 days from the day that the finance started) settlement to cancel your agreement, they can't take back the incentives. Did this with the wife's A1 to get £500 deposit contribution and paid off in full the next day.
Edited by: "monkeyhanger75" 23rd Jan

Why expired?

monkeyhanger75

Why wouldn't you take finance just to get the incentive deposit … Why wouldn't you take finance just to get the incentive deposit contribution and then just settle up next day with the finance company and pay about £2 interest? When you ask for a cooling period (14 days from the day that the finance started) settlement to cancel your agreement, they can't take back the incentives. Did this with the wife's A1 to get £500 deposit contribution and paid off in full the next day.



​was just about to write the exact same thing

monkeyhanger75

Why wouldn't you take finance just to get the incentive deposit … Why wouldn't you take finance just to get the incentive deposit contribution and then just settle up next day with the finance company and pay about £2 interest? When you ask for a cooling period (14 days from the day that the finance started) settlement to cancel your agreement, they can't take back the incentives. Did this with the wife's A1 to get £500 deposit contribution and paid off in full the next day.



Well I wouldn't buy the car at first instance: a new 1.4 petrol with under 100hp? However, to answer your question, because you would be paying more for the car. I don't think any (smart) finance company will allow you to pay off in full (and if they do there would be a charge or the interest rate applied onthe loan would be higher just like they are on some mortgages) and/or cancel to take advantage of incentives. That's called deception (at least the latter part).

nnj10

Why expired?



No stock.

m5rcc

Well I wouldn't buy the car at first instance: a new 1.4 petrol with … Well I wouldn't buy the car at first instance: a new 1.4 petrol with under 100hp? However, to answer your question, because you would be paying more for the car. I don't think any (smart) finance company will allow you to pay off in full (and if they do there would be a charge or the interest rate applied on the loan would be higher just like they are on some mortgages) and/or cancel to take advantage of incentives. That's called deception (at least the latter part).



Buying this car is irrelevant - I wouldn't touch this car with a barge pole as the household's primary car, I like hot hatches. I only buy new on cars I want, if their residuals are so good the price they charge for a new one under achievable discount is similar to what a nearly new one is sold for e.g. If I wanted a Ford (not RS), Renault, Vauxhall, i'd buy an 18 month old one for 1/2 RRP. If I wanted a hot hatch VW Golf/Audi A3 i'd buy new for 12-15% discount rather than a year old one for 80% of RRP.

You have every right to cancel a finance agreement within 14 days (it is enshrined in consumer law) - you would still have to pay for the car by other means, cancelling the finance doesn't allow you to just hand the car back within 14 days and say you changed your mind. It is not deception to do this.

When you cancel your finance, they work out interest based on the time you took the loan out to the time you requested cancellation and a settlement figure. If you collect the car on finance on Tuesday and request a cancellation on Wednesday on a £12k car that has a £1k manufacturer/dealer deposit contribution (effectively making it £11k finance balance) and it has a 6% APR rate attached to the finance, you pay 1 day's interest at the 6% rate on the balance, which would be somewhere in the region of £1.81. They cannot charge you anything other than interest accrued when you cancel within the cooling off period.

Plenty of people do this (who either have the cash to buy the car outright or have a cheaper loan waiting in the wings), it is perfectly legal to do so, and not dishonest. Car salespeople don't like you doing this as they won't get their kickback from the finance agreement if you do it. The car finance companies know the risk of the consumer doing this and know they have every right to do it, but hope you won't.

Car companies can make more money from the finance than the car itself, and when 1/3 of the monthly PCP cost can be interest, isn't that a bit much?

If you go to settle finance outside the 14 day finance cooling off period, there will be early settlement penalties - usually 2 months penalty interest and perhaps a small (£50-100) agreement closure "option to buy" fee. You would still keep the incentives though.

My Golf R didn't come with incentives when I bought it, so no need to go through finance, but if I were buying again now with £2k deposit contribution, i'd do it and pay off outright the next day.

I hope you've learned something today.



Edited by: "monkeyhanger75" 24th Jan

monkeyhanger75

Buying this car is irrelevant - I wouldn't touch this car with a barge … Buying this car is irrelevant - I wouldn't touch this car with a barge pole as the household's primary car, I like hot hatches. I only buy new on cars I want, if their residuals are so good the price they charge for a new one under achievable discount is similar to what a nearly new one is sold for e.g. If I wanted a Ford (not RS), Renault, Vauxhall, i'd buy an 18 month old one for 1/2 RRP. If I wanted a hot hatch VW Golf/Audi A3 i'd buy new for 12-15% discount rather than a year old one for 80% of RRP.You have every right to cancel a finance agreement within 14 days (it is enshrined in consumer law) - you would still have to pay for the car by other means, cancelling the finance doesn't allow you to just hand the car back within 14 days and say you changed your mind. It is not deception to do this. When you cancel your finance, they work out interest based on the time you took the loan out to the time you requested cancellation and a settlement figure. If you collect the car on finance on Tuesday and request a cancellation on Wednesday on a £12k car that has a £1k manufacturer/dealer deposit contribution (effectively making it £11k finance balance) and it has a 6% APR rate attached to the finance, you pay 1 day's interest at the 6% rate on the balance, which would be somewhere in the region of £1.81. They cannot charge you anything other than interest accrued when you cancel within the cooling off period.Plenty of people do this (who either have the cash to buy the car outright or have a cheaper loan waiting in the wings), it is perfectly legal to do so, and not dishonest. Car salespeople don't like you doing this as they won't get their kickback from the finance agreement if you do it. The car finance companies know the risk of the consumer doing this and know they have every right to do it, but hope you won't.Car companies can make more money from the finance than the car itself, and when 1/3 of the monthly PCP cost can be interest, isn't that a bit much?If you go to settle finance outside the 14 day finance cooling off period, there will be early settlement penalties - usually 2 months penalty interest and perhaps a small (£50-100) agreement closure "option to buy" fee. You would still keep the incentives though.My Golf R didn't come with incentives when I bought it, so no need to go through finance, but if I were buying again now with £2k deposit contribution, i'd do it and pay off outright the next day.I hope you've learned something today.



Not really no. I know you have every right to cancel a financial agreement. What I was referring to was that you are intentionally taking out finance, in order to cancel it, in order to obtain the dealer contribution offered. That is definitely deception - whether you want to wash it as you being smart or abusing the system.

^going off your previous comments, you didn't know you could cancel a financial agreement within cooling off period without a heavy penalty. Backpedalling when you're wrong again - not your first time.

Playing the system's established rules in a completely lawful way is not deception. Some friendly salepeople (not many) even suggest doing it, if getting the incentive is what it takes to clinch a sale. It seems more distasteful to dangle a financial carrot that when taken in the way they want you to will cost you 3x more than the incentive in interest, and they're charging twice the rate of a high street loan.

So by your code of ethics, how long should you maintain the finance in order to sleep at night, having had the incentives? 2 months? 12 months? Full term?

People here who jump on a misprice here are obviously also deceptive, and the money saving expert must be the biggest crook around for suggesting it.


Edited by: "monkeyhanger75" 25th Jan

monkeyhanger75

^going off your previous comments, you didn't know you could cancel a … ^going off your previous comments, you didn't know you could cancel a financial agreement within cooling off period without a heavy penalty. Backpedalling when you're wrong again - not your first time



When did I ever say one couldn't cancel a financial agreement? Read what I wrote. I wrote that you wouldn't be able to cancel a financial agreement in order to take advantage of incentives. That is deception whether you accept that or not.

monkeyhanger75

Playing the system's established rules in a completely lawful way is not … Playing the system's established rules in a completely lawful way is not deception. Some friendly salepeople (not many) even suggest doing it, if getting the incentive is what it takes to clinch a sale.



Now we cross into fraud. Excellent!

monkeyhanger75

It seems more distasteful to dangle a financial carrot that when taken in … It seems more distasteful to dangle a financial carrot that when taken in the way they want you to will cost you 3x more than the incentive in interest, and they're charging twice the rate of a high street loan.



That's how business works. They will give you the 'incentive' of a discount, masked by a higher interest rate. Why would they give you the discount rate as a cash price? It's the same when they offer you a price for your part-exchange.

monkeyhanger75

So by your code of ethics, how long should you maintain the finance in … So by your code of ethics, how long should you maintain the finance in order to sleep at night, having had the incentives? 2 months? 12 months? Full term?



I don't take finance on anything. If I can't afford to have it, I don't have it. I'm not vain.

monkeyhanger75

People here who jump on a misprice here are obviously also deceptive, and … People here who jump on a misprice here are obviously also deceptive, and the money saving expert must be the biggest crook around for suggesting it.



Then you don't understand the law. Shops don't have to sell anything to you if they don't want to, regardless of price. Yet deliberately misleading you is criminal. That's the difference.

I hope you've learned something today.
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text