Bread Maker  £29.99 at ALDI
356°Expired

Bread Maker £29.99 at ALDI

£29.99ALDI Deals
49
Found 25th Jun 2015
Freshly baked bread whenever you want.
• 19 automatic programmes to make a variety of loaves, dough, jam, cakes, rice bread and yogurt
• Adjustable crust control – light, medium or dark
• Easy-to-read LCD panel
• Cool-touch walls and non-slip feet
• Viewing window
• Includes Measuring Spoon, Measuring Cup, Hook, 2 Kneading Blades and removable Non-Stick Bowl
• Loaf size selection 500-900g
• 60 minute keep-warm function
• Available in White or Black

49 Comments

cold. it is £29.99, not £19.99.

Website says £29.99

Original Poster

WhiteNoiseMaker

Website says £29.99


Typo, edited now

Why bother?

black knight

Why bother?



Do you mean why bother with a breadmaker?
Read the ingredients on a supermarket loaf and compare it to the ingredients needed for a breadmaker.
Much healthier and some of cannot digest the crap passed off as bread by the supermarkets.

Plus it`s fresher and tastier

PS I have a breadmaker X)

HOT OP

I have been making my own bread for the last six years and use my bread-maker a lot! So far I'm had two machines. In my experience they always break after 18 months in exactly the same way, when the mixer spindle comes loose in its nylon bearing (both of my machines have had to have the mixing tin replaced under warranty).
I bought an Aldi bread-maker about six months ago when they were being sold off cheap for £17.99. It's actually cheaper to buy a new bread-maker than buy a new mixing tin. I didn't need it then but true to form, and right on schedule, the spindle has just gone again on my Morphy Richards. As it's now out if warranty, I'll be digging the Aldi machine out of the garage and seeing if it's any good. Fingers crossed...

Looks like they have tried to copy Panasonic wonder if it will compare? I had 2 breadmakers go before I splashed out on my panny that is as good as they say it is

aldi normally have 3yr. guarantee.
hot !

Banned

sherbolton

Looks like they have tried to copy Panasonic wonder if it will compare? I … Looks like they have tried to copy Panasonic wonder if it will compare? I had 2 breadmakers go before I splashed out on my panny that is as good as they say it is


I also have a Panasonic.
After MANY cheapos. ( about 6)
None of them can match the Panasonic !

Got a free bread maker,they're called hands
http://media.giphy.com/media/oDDDWKDfDMfRu/giphy.gif

Pluun

I also have a Panasonic.After MANY cheapos. ( about 6)None of them can … I also have a Panasonic.After MANY cheapos. ( about 6)None of them can match the Panasonic !


Me to ;-) It's excellence machine ;-)

Banned

Yes Sayenn.
So good that my buddy has told me not to make her any more as she has to watch her weight but she can't stop eating it.

Banned

themachman

Got a free bread maker,they're called hands


Yet you are reading this post?

Pluun

Yet you are reading this post?


yes i need to read it before i can comment on it?

Save money put your £30 towards a Panasonic, really the only way to go imho.

Hot for good price but I'll wager after 6 months you'll be looking to change it

+1 for Panasonic

EastLondon

+1 for Panasonic



+5 for a Polish au-pair

If you're using the timer on your mixer pour the water in first and put the flour on top of that, then the salt and yeast seperately on top of the flour so they don't go off too early.

It's a bit of a learning process finding out what mix produces a good loaf with a particular mixer but I'd say this - stick with the same flour and experiment with the hydration level. The 64% you see a lot is far from a strict rule and I find the wetter the better. And if you've got an electronic scale then weigh your water as it's far easier to get it spot on.

Edit: And if you're still not getting the results you want then change your flour. I could never get a good loaf with Allinsons no matter what I did. I tried lots of different ones and Sainsburys was the best of the own brands and Carrs the best overall.

TBH handmade bread is easy to do and the result is much better than you get from these machines. It's worth learning to make it.

Saying that, making it by hand requires time. It's not really time-consuming as such, but you need to be around to knock back the dough, get it ready for the oven, etc. These machines do a reasonable enough job of basic loaves and they'll take care of the whole thing while you're at work. They're a good solution for when you don't have time.
Edited by: "satchef1" 26th Jun 2015

Toyed with the idea of buying a breadmaker but would want to make a salt free, or virtually salt free. Anyone had success without salt?

Costs too much dough

rickyroma

Toyed with the idea of buying a breadmaker but would want to make a salt … Toyed with the idea of buying a breadmaker but would want to make a salt free, or virtually salt free. Anyone had success without salt?



Bread doesn't need salt. It's added for flavour.

Salt kills yeast. Many a failed loaf can be put down to too much salt/salted added in the wrong way/at the wrong time.
Edited by: "satchef1" 26th Jun 2015

Like many others it's Panasonic all the way. Perhaps like i did, it's worth buying a cheaper budget model to see whether you get into the bread making 'thing'. Word of warning though, the breads you make will be so delicious that unless you show some restraint, they can make you fat!

Hmmmm, clicked on this for a quick read expecting people to say they collect dust.
I'm interested to get one now and sounds like a great idea.
Any links or model numbers on the Panasonic ones people speak about?

People saying lasts 18months. Is this 18months of using every day?

If I'm going to get one, may aswell get one that's decent from the start!

Purchased this last year. It is still going strong and I make 2-3 loaves a week. Very good value in my opinion, however the beep telling you when it's ready is stupendously loud!

When the bread from a bread maker only stays fresh for a couple of days it does make you wonder what kak they put in the cotton wool bread in the supermarkets.
Edited by: "speric07" 26th Jun 2015

If we are swapping bread making tips, here's mine...
Forget about baking the bread in the bread maker and just use it for mixing the dough (which is the hardest part). This way you can double up on the amount of dough you make at any one time. Once it has risen right to the top of the lid, take it out, squish it flat and cut it up into rolls. Put the rolls on to silicone rubber trays and put into a pre-warmed oven for their second rise (about 1 to 1.5 hours). The final bit will vary from oven to oven but I cook my rolls, from cold at 200C for just 15 minutes. Rises perfectly every time for me.
Also, when you are doing the first mix, just keep slowly adding flour to the mix until the dough 'balls' properly (this is when it's not too wet and not too dry). Flours do vary and this way you can get the dough just right. I find Lidl flour perfect for my needs. At 75p a bag for both white and wholemeal, it's very cheap. Aldi dried yeast works well and is also dirt cheap.
Finally think about adding 'stuff' to your bread. I routinely add natural yogurt, sour cream, black treacle, orange juice and loads of seeds (sunflower, pumpkin, black mustard, tumeric, nigella, sesame, white poppy, coriander, flax, cumin, fennel and caraway). The bread smells fantastic when it's baking and tastes brilliant. I could never go back to bland, ordinary bread now.

Looks like a pretty respectable bread maker but these generic Chinese breadmakers in my experience don't produce a loaf as good as Panasonic and the loaf's are more likely to fail so can be a false economy. It makes more sense to get Panasonic as the cost of bread ingredients are quite high and a higher percentage of failed loafs will soon add up in cost.

One tip is ask Tesco or another store with a built in bakery for fresh yeast when shopping. They will normally give you some for free. It can also be frozen for later use, with a maximum life of about 3 months under ideal conditions. I would normally separate it into smaller pieces ideal for each loaf before freezing.

Comment

Jawz

Hmmmm, clicked on this for a quick read expecting people to say they … Hmmmm, clicked on this for a quick read expecting people to say they collect dust. I'm interested to get one now and sounds like a great idea. Any links or model numbers on the Panasonic ones people speak about? People saying lasts 18months. Is this 18months of using every day? If I'm going to get one, may aswell get one that's decent from the start!



Also been toying with getting a breadmaker for a long time, would also be greatfull if someone could posts the Panasonic make-model.

Comment

sherbolton

Looks like they have tried to copy Panasonic wonder if it will compare? I … Looks like they have tried to copy Panasonic wonder if it will compare? I had 2 breadmakers go before I splashed out on my panny that is as good as they say it is



I brought this bread maker when Aldi sold it last year. It's brilliant. Never had a problem

Comment

Jawz

Hmmmm, clicked on this for a quick read expecting people to say they … Hmmmm, clicked on this for a quick read expecting people to say they collect dust. I'm interested to get one now and sounds like a great idea. Any links or model numbers on the Panasonic ones people speak about? People saying lasts 18months. Is this 18months of using every day? If I'm going to get one, may aswell get one that's decent from the start!



I have this bread maker which I got when Aldi sold it last year.

Imo, it's just as good as other brands. I can't fault it, it's brilliant.

rickyroma

Toyed with the idea of buying a breadmaker but would want to make a salt … Toyed with the idea of buying a breadmaker but would want to make a salt free, or virtually salt free. Anyone had success without salt?


I've been making my own bread for 2 years now - by hand. I put about half a teaspoon of salt in a 800g loaf. I think all the salt does is stop the bread going mouldy so quickly, and slightly affect the taste. As my bread is all eaten in 24 hours mould is not a problem. I suspect you could probably leave the salt out and no one would notice. You've got me thinking.......

Camiano

I've been making my own bread for 2 years now - by hand. I put about half … I've been making my own bread for 2 years now - by hand. I put about half a teaspoon of salt in a 800g loaf. I think all the salt does is stop the bread going mouldy so quickly, and slightly affect the taste. As my bread is all eaten in 24 hours mould is not a problem. I suspect you could probably leave the salt out and no one would notice. You've got me thinking.......


I always thought that you needed some salt to inhibit the rate of growth of the yeast. Too much CO2, too quickly makes for a dough with big bubbles in it (or so the theory goes). Both the wife and I like our bread with far less salt in it than most of the recipes suggest. Typically we use about a third of what is recommended. Remember if you have a cheese sandwich, you will be getting salt from the butter and from the cheese so you really don't need so much in the bread.

alfadaz

CommentAlso been toying with getting a breadmaker for a long time, would … CommentAlso been toying with getting a breadmaker for a long time, would also be greatfull if someone could posts the Panasonic make-model.


The Panasonic's are nice but let's be honest, they should be at the price they charge for them! You could buy five Aldi ones (at the price I paid) for one Panasonic. If I were you, I'd buy a cheapie one to start with and see how you get on with it. You do need time to get into bread making. I only got into it when I stopped being a wage-slave.

alfadaz

CommentAlso been toying with getting a breadmaker for a long time, would … CommentAlso been toying with getting a breadmaker for a long time, would also be greatfull if someone could posts the Panasonic make-model.



The Panasonic SD-2501 is an excellent model and allows nuts etc to be added automatically. It may have been superseded but stick to similar models and you won't go far wrong

rickyroma

Toyed with the idea of buying a breadmaker but would want to make a salt … Toyed with the idea of buying a breadmaker but would want to make a salt free, or virtually salt free. Anyone had success without salt?




I followed the manufacturer's recipe for the first loaf I made in a breadmaker, then cut back on the salt in stages, I settled on just under half a teaspoon per loaf, but have yet to try it without.

I found I needed to cut down on the sugar as well, as the yeast becomes more active with less salt, making the dough rise to the lid if I didn't also cut the sugar.

Reducing salt might effect how long before the loaf goes mouldy, but I usually slice the whole loaf and freeze what I don't use that day, before it can go stale.

Sounds good, and two weeks after they will reduce them half price which is even greater

martaluscious

Sounds good, and two weeks after they will reduce them half price which … Sounds good, and two weeks after they will reduce them half price which is even greater



If they have any left, last time Lidl had breadmakers, they sold out within a few days.

melted

If they have any left, last time Lidl had breadmakers, they sold out … If they have any left, last time Lidl had breadmakers, they sold out within a few days.



You are lucky if you get a few days. Some stuff turns up on a Thursday at my local Lidl and it's gone in a few hours.

melted

If they have any left, last time Lidl had breadmakers, they sold out … If they have any left, last time Lidl had breadmakers, they sold out within a few days.


Lidl ones have twin paddles in a longer breadtin so you get a longer traditional shape loaf ,
I struggle to get a loaf that's not too browned out on the outside
Any tips for achieving a soft lightly browned loaf just like the supermarkets
Thanks

darklight

Lidl ones have twin paddles in a longer breadtin so you get a longer … Lidl ones have twin paddles in a longer breadtin so you get a longer traditional shape loaf , I struggle to get a loaf that's not too browned out on the outsideAny tips for achieving a soft lightly browned loaf just like the supermarketsThanks


One of the main reasons I stopped baking my dough in the bread maker was that the crust was far too brown and far too thick. If you just use the bread maker for kneading the dough, then, after the first rise, turn it out on to a board for shaping and then put it in the oven for its second rise and cooking, you will find you get a much nicer crust.
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