Brush up on your grammar! Eats, shoots and leaves for £6.17 incl. P&P! @ Wordery
32°Expired

Brush up on your grammar! Eats, shoots and leaves for £6.17 incl. P&P! @ Wordery

26
Found 13th May 2015
Unsure when it's their, they're or there?

Randomly use apostrophes to make words plural even though they are incorrect?

Does seeing someone write "should of gone to the shop's" make you seethe and your blood boil?

Then this is the book for you!

26 Comments

Banned

By eck!

@ OP: Time to change your avatar.

http://i3.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/original/000/372/586/6e5.png

(Does seeing someone write "should of gone to the shop's" make you seethe and your blood boil? Then this is the book for you!)

If you seeth like me because someone writes that then you're already past needing the book, though A LOT OF PEOPLE DO NEED IT. Well done for trying to educate people OP.

Banned

dealwatcher55

(Does seeing someone write "should of gone to the shop's" make you seethe … (Does seeing someone write "should of gone to the shop's" make you seethe and your blood boil? Then this is the book for you!)If you seeth like me because someone writes that then you're already past needing the book, though A LOT OF PEOPLE DO NEED IT. Well done for trying to educate people OP.



Are you for real?

The vast majority of people need this. I think I could do with a good read....

This should be given out free by every Internet Provider

Original Poster

By the way, I'm not saying that this is my personal stance on grammar. The original post pokes a bit of fun of the content of the book, and the way the writer describes her own feelings about grammar usage...not mine Genuinely thought this was a good price for a funny modern classic

UriStamanov

Randomly use apostrophes to make words plural even though they are … Randomly use apostrophes to make words plural even though they are incorrect?



Do you randomly use apostrophes to make words plural even though they are incorrect?

There needs to be an object in the sentence.

UriStamanov

Does seeing someone write "should of gone to the shop's" make you seethe … Does seeing someone write "should of gone to the shop's" make you seethe and your blood boil?



As to 'seethe' means to boil, then your sentence includes a tautology. Perhaps you could make your 'blood seethe'?

dealwatcher55

(Does seeing someone write "should of gone to the shop's" make you seethe … (Does seeing someone write "should of gone to the shop's" make you seethe and your blood boil? Then this is the book for you!)If you seeth like me because someone writes that then you're already past needing the book, though A LOT OF PEOPLE DO NEED IT. Well done for trying to educate people OP.



If, like me, you seethe because somebody writes like that, then you're already past needing the book. Although, a lot of people do need it! Well done for trying to educate people, original poster.

Seeth is the archaic middle English spelling. Do we know who the 'someone is? If not, and we are generalising, we need to use 'somebody'. There is no excuse for a capitalising part of a sentence. It is also a run-on sentence. It could have been saved with a semi-colon, I suppose. Use more full-stops, and write more simply.

saucymonk

The vast majority of people need this. I think I could do with a good … The vast majority of people need this. I think I could do with a good read....



An ellipsis should only ever have three dots...

I look forward to people correcting my grandma and speelin.


Edited by: "cheapo" 13th May 2015

I'd rather correct them online and make myself feel like a big man

Original Poster

I love the comments on this so far just don't let it detract from the deal itself!

Original Poster

Oh and Cheapo, you're right about three dots. I wasn't aware of any rules however I prefer to max out at three. I was writing this post at one o'clock ish.

UriStamonov

Oh and Cheapo, you're right about three dots. I wasn't aware of any rules … Oh and Cheapo, you're right about three dots. I wasn't aware of any rules however I prefer to max out at three. I was writing this post at one o'clock ish.


extra dots after 1 are ok

Sid Harper

extra dots after 1 are ok



Extra dots after one is ok.

It is not true either. There is the full stop (it will not let me use parentheses surrounding a full stop as it looks like a boob), and there is ellipsis(...).

Ellipsis is usually used to denote an omission of some sort. But, normally on the internet, it is used as a cliffhanger where a poster will use it to 'drop the mic' after writing what they see as an awesome piece of wisdom, but what is more likely to be trite doggerel...



Edited by: "cheapo" 13th May 2015

Very good book. You'll get inverted snobs saying this is elitist. Correct grammatical construction takes time and effort to achieve, and in all likelihood this is because of the way English has been taught at schools these last few decades, with too much emphasis on imagination to the detriment of language skills. I see this as a class issue. Fee-paying schools have tended to maintain high standards, whereas state schools have fallen behind. So correct grammar for the rich and poor literacy for the rest of us. Heat added.

Its a great book, their aint nothing you wont learn from it. My kid's and me brought it last week!!!

cheapo

Extra dots after one is ok.It is not true either. There is the full stop … Extra dots after one is ok.It is not true either. There is the full stop (it will not let me use parentheses surrounding a full stop as it looks liek a boob), and there is ellipsis(...).Ellipsis is usually used to denote an omission of some sort. But, normally on the internet, it is used as a cliffhanger where a poster will use it to 'drop the mic' after writing what they see as an awesome piece of wisdom, but what is more likely to be trite doggerel...



all very good but I was talking about 1 o'clock!

Original Poster

For me the irony is that I went to a state grammar school, and have subsequently realised I learnt little to no English grammar in my time there. I'm glad this post has people talking, it's a fun book and if I recall correctly the author is quite up front about having serious psychological issues when it comes to grammar In my experience English can actually be really difficult due to the lack of rigid rules, when compared to other languages. Except for using apostrophes to make words plural. That's just intolerable! (Walks away from the blue touch paper dot dot dot).

What there's a whole book about a joke about a Panda and a Prostitute?

mike203uk

Very good book. You'll get inverted snobs saying this is elitist. … Very good book. You'll get inverted snobs saying this is elitist. Correct grammatical construction takes time and effort to achieve, and in all likelihood this is because of the way English has been taught at schools these last few decades, with too much emphasis on imagination to the detriment of language skills. I see this as a class issue. Fee-paying schools have tended to maintain high standards, whereas state schools have fallen behind. So correct grammar for the rich and poor literacy for the rest of us. Heat added.



Be careful. You will be saying that people should earn their own money and pay for their own families next. Middle-class liberalism has indeed infected education for far too long. With an over-reliance on being non-judgmental, policies of inclusion, and the desire to pathologise every type of poor behaviour, standards have been eradicated.

Although relatively bright, I was spat out of a secondary education system with a chip on my shoulder (mostly my fault, with a smidgen of (lack of) help from my parents and uninterested teaching staff). It was not until working for peanuts for three years that I went back to educate myself. I obtained skills, and grammar was one of them. It isn't about pedantry. It is about being accurate. The more precise you are, the easier it is for the reader to understand.

cheapo

[quote=mike203uk] It isn't about pedantry. It is about being accurate. … [quote=mike203uk] It isn't about pedantry. It is about being accurate. The more precise you are, the easier it is for the reader to understand.



This. Absolutely this. I cannot tell you how many conflicts might have been avoided if this advice was followed.

This is commendable. I'm from a working-class background, went to an appalling school, and likewise had to take initiative. Educational orthodoxy (e.g. raising self-esteem instead of challenging mistakes) has been utterly detrimental. I wonder whether a correlation exists between poor standards and disengagement with politics. A semi-literate population is ill-equipped to challenge the status quo, after all. By the way, I work in education. At a recent meeting we were told not to use red pens when marking - it could damage the little darlings' sense of self-worth!

cheapo

Be careful. You will be saying that people should earn their own money … Be careful. You will be saying that people should earn their own money and pay for their own families next. Middle-class liberalism has indeed infected education for far too long. With an over-reliance on being non-judgmental, policies of inclusion, and the desire to pathologise every type of poor behaviour, standards have been eradicated.Although relatively bright, I was spat out of a secondary education system with a chip on my shoulder (mostly my fault, with a smidgen of (lack of) help from my parents and uninterested teaching staff). It was not until working for peanuts for three years that I went back to educate myself. I obtained skills, and grammar was one of them. It isn't about pedantry. It is about being accurate. The more precise you are, the easier it is for the reader to understand.



Edited by: "mike203uk" 13th May 2015

UriStamonov

"should of gone to the shop's"

It's not even the apostrophe that gets me here. It's the non-existent 'should of' that does it. Though my biggest pet hate at the moment is people turning Caps Lock on and off to do a capital letter. I have no idea where this started, but I see so many people doing it.oO

Quietus

It's not even the apostrophe that gets me here. It's the non-existent … It's not even the apostrophe that gets me here. It's the non-existent 'should of' that does it. Though my biggest pet hate at the moment is people turning Caps Lock on and off to do a capital letter. I have no idea where this started, but I see so many people doing it.oO



I know what you mean. Still, this can help:

http://i.imgur.com/LSmlNyQ.gif

mike203uk

This is commendable. I'm from a working-class background, went to an … This is commendable. I'm from a working-class background, went to an appalling school, and likewise had to take initiative. Educational orthodoxy (e.g. raising self-esteem instead of challenging mistakes) has been utterly detrimental. I wonder whether a correlation exists between poor standards and disengagement with politics. A semi-literate population is ill-equipped to challenge the status quo, after all. By the way, I work in education. At a recent meeting we were told not to use red pens when marking - it could damage the little darlings' sense of self-worth!



My granddaughter is bright and advanced in her reading. When quizzing her parents about her homework book it was explained that the children are 'encouraged to spell how it sounds'. This idea that through phonics and not correcting children will eventually find their way is preposterous and symptomatic of our problems.

By not judging or correcting you create generations of people who have never been judged, then in turn they do not judge their progeny and cry when real life judges them. You can not develop your critical faculty when you have never experienced rational judgment.

Watching ITV news last night was symptomatic of this. When talking about the benefit cuts they interviewed a young lad who wanted to move out into a flat, but was bemoaning that the automatic awarding of housing benefit for under 21 year olds is to be scrapped. He was not able to move out of his parents home because he was interning for a radio station and was unpaid. The following group of individuals were apprentice metal workers and agreed wholeheartedly with this idea and the idea about limiting job seekers allowance to six months.

Why would this seemingly decent young lad think that the country owed him his own flat? My suspicion is the lack of criticism taught in schools, both in terms of the language and the ability to debate, and a cultural shift where we are now attitudinally expecting government help by default.

Good point. Too much self-esteem = overblown ego. Rational judgement seems to have gone out of fashion.

cheapo

My granddaughter is bright and advanced in her reading. When quizzing her … My granddaughter is bright and advanced in her reading. When quizzing her parents about her homework book it was explained that the children are 'encouraged to spell how it sounds'. This idea that through phonics and not correcting children will eventually find their way is preposterous and symptomatic of our problems.By not judging or correcting you create generations of people who have never been judged, then in turn they do not judge their progeny and cry when real life judges them. You can not develop your critical faculty when you have never experienced rational judgment. Watching ITV news last night was symptomatic of this. When talking about the benefit cuts they interviewed a young lad who wanted to move out into a flat, but was bemoaning that the automatic awarding of housing benefit for under 21 year olds is to be scrapped. He was not able to move out of his parents home because he was interning for a radio station and was unpaid. The following group of individuals were apprentice metal workers and agreed wholeheartedly with this idea and the idea about limiting job seekers allowance to six months. Why would this seemingly decent young lad think that the country owed him his own flat? My suspicion is the lack of criticism taught in schools, both in terms of the language and the ability to debate, and a cultural shift where we are now attitudinally expecting government help by default.


LandOfConfusion

I know what you mean. Still, this can help:



Totally agree, and my pet hate in the spoken word is the clumsy, ungrammatical reply of someone who has made a mistake coming out with "my bad", Seems it's become the trendy thing to say taking over from littering every spoken sentence with the word "like".

Seems most people on here lean towards accusing those who care about the correct form as being up tight, uncool and numerous other descriptions and could not care less about the Queen's English. No wonder I cannot undestand much of what is uttered or written these days,
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