BT Whole Home Wifi £161.49 @ Robert Dyas with code
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BT Whole Home Wifi £161.49 @ Robert Dyas with code

35
Found 28th Jul 2017
Just got an email from Robert Dyas with this offer in - use code JULY15 to take 15% off anything until Monday.

BT Whole Home Wifi system (3x disc kit) at Robert Dyas currently priced at £189.99, but with code this drops to £161.49.

Reviews of these are good. Not something I need as I don't have a large flat, and a recent router upgrade has dealt with my wi-fi issues, but larger households would be likely to benefit.

Should be able to get cashback with TCB.
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Good price and good value system. Very pleased with mine.
Can these be used with virgin media
Yes, these work really well with VIrgin. Got mine set up easily. 100MB throughout my large two bed flat. Very happy with this system. Highly recommended and have yet to have any dropouts after using the system for about 6 months now. Vastly superior to the buggy Superhub,
£160?!?!
If you need better coverage, why not just put a few old routers in AP mode and spread them around your house? Cost: free.
TehJumpingJawa

£160?!?!If you need better coverage, why not just put a few old routers … £160?!?!If you need better coverage, why not just put a few old routers in AP mode and spread them around your house? Cost: free.


A man (or woman?) who thinks like I do!
TehJumpingJawa

£160?!?!If you need better coverage, why not just put a few old routers … £160?!?!If you need better coverage, why not just put a few old routers in AP mode and spread them around your house? Cost: free.


That's what all those old Home Hubs that BT don't want back, and send me in error, are doing.
TehJumpingJawa

£160?!?!If you need better coverage, why not just put a few old routers … £160?!?!If you need better coverage, why not just put a few old routers in AP mode and spread them around your house? Cost: free.


Please explain this in layman's terms. How do I put them in AP mode?!
Playing devil's advocate, I'd question the need for these in most residential properties. We live in a 2000 sq/ft 260 year old house with 1-3 ft thick stone walls in most places. I have a ZyXel VMG8924 (internal antennae) gateway at one end of the house and an Archer C7 (3 x external antennae) at the other end of the house, on the ground level, and we don't have any Wi-Fi black spots.
I think part of the issue is the often mis-informed strive for 5GHz connectivity, when a decent 2.4GHz link will be more than enough bandwidth to transfer all the data most broadband connections can throughput, and offer less issues in the average home.
Instead of spending £170 on this, most would be better off spending £60 on a reasonable cable router and 8 port GbE switch, then hard-wiring any static IP enabled kit and use the router as a wireless AP along with your gateway (assuming that's also wireless), strategically placed in the property, for your mobile kit.

Paul
I've got a old terrace and this finally sorted out the loft room where even powerline couldn't probably due to the wiring job. It's plug and play to coin an old term which is what I needed.
Handy to have an Ethernet connection on each.
TehJumpingJawa

£160?!?!If you need better coverage, why not just put a few old routers … £160?!?!If you need better coverage, why not just put a few old routers in AP mode and spread them around your house? Cost: free.


But it doesn't work very well for switching between them in my experience. End up with devices hanging onto the signal from one point, even though there is another closer. Or it drops the connection for several minutes as it switches from one to another.
I want something that works seamlessly.
Excellent system, just make sure the firmware is up to date. App is a work in progress but due an update September if not before.
youngsyp

Playing devil's advocate, I'd question the need for these in most … Playing devil's advocate, I'd question the need for these in most residential properties. We live in a 2000 sq/ft 260 year old house with 1-3 ft thick stone walls in most places. I have a ZyXel VMG8924 (internal antennae) gateway at one end of the house and an Archer C7 (3 x external antennae) at the other end of the house, on the ground level, and we don't have any Wi-Fi black spots.I think part of the issue is the often mis-informed strive for 5GHz connectivity, when a decent 2.4GHz link will be more than enough bandwidth to transfer all the data most broadband connections can throughput, and offer less issues in the average home.Instead of spending £170 on this, most would be better off spending £60 on a reasonable cable router and 8 port GbE switch, then hard-wiring any static IP enabled kit and use the router as a wireless AP along with your gateway (assuming that's also wireless), strategically placed in the property, for your mobile kit.Paul


I agree unless you live in mansion. I did a similar thing in a friend's house, just powerline from one wireless router to another. One router at front corner of house (where their PC is) and another (old router in AP mode) in opposite corner at rear (where TV is) it needed this anyway for their Youview box.
Yes I agree though some devices do hang on to the weaker signal as you walk through the house, though in practice they never seem to notice, and having the second router at the rear of the house gives excellent coverage into the back garden. Cost only about £20 for the powerline. Modern routers (even the standard free ones) do give great coverage now, I've found the Sky hub and and EE brightbox to be very good, and even placed sitting in the front corner of my house gives excellent coverage through the house, out the front into the garage and in the garden. Compared with a talktalk router I had a couple of years ago (it struggled even into the next room so I ditched that in favour of a Plusnet Technicolour one) the coverage is great
TehJumpingJawa

£160?!?!If you need better coverage, why not just put a few old routers … £160?!?!If you need better coverage, why not just put a few old routers in AP mode and spread them around your house? Cost: free.



Old AP's do not form a mesh network or support AC wifi
vclaw

But it doesn't work very well for switching between them in my … But it doesn't work very well for switching between them in my experience. End up with devices hanging onto the signal from one point, even though there is another closer. Or it drops the connection for several minutes as it switches from one to another.I want something that works seamlessly.

On mobile use Swifi to switch automatically without noticing.
I have just ditched all my wired PoE APs (4 of them as we have granite walls in Cornwall which are impervious to WiFi) and replaced them with 6 of these, all meshing nicely. The main advantage is not having to switch between different SSIDs around the place as I move around with my devices - it used to be a real pain disconnecting and reconnecting to get a better signal. I value this product enormously, and I have been through a lot of different options in the past! This is product is much more than a wireless extender, a powerline or a standalone access point.
youngsyp

Playing devil's advocate, I'd question the need for these in most … Playing devil's advocate, I'd question the need for these in most residential properties. We live in a 2000 sq/ft 260 year old house with 1-3 ft thick stone walls in most places. I have a ZyXel VMG8924 (internal antennae) gateway at one end of the house and an Archer C7 (3 x external antennae) at the other end of the house, on the ground level, and we don't have any Wi-Fi black spots.I think part of the issue is the often mis-informed strive for 5GHz connectivity, when a decent 2.4GHz link will be more than enough bandwidth to transfer all the data most broadband connections can throughput, and offer less issues in the average home.Instead of spending £170 on this, most would be better off spending £60 on a reasonable cable router and 8 port GbE switch, then hard-wiring any static IP enabled kit and use the router as a wireless AP along with your gateway (assuming that's also wireless), strategically placed in the property, for your mobile kit.Paul



Distance and how much your walls attenuate the signal aren't the only factors you need to consider. You also have to consider number and type of devices, what people use them for, how they move around the house while using them, how well they switch between AP's, ability to wire the two AP's together, wether you can wire other devices (cable routing is usually challenging in residential properties) and number of devices competing for the same spectrum.

We live in a large town house, ~77sqm per floor and 3 floors. We have a central comms cupboard with CAT6 distributed around the house for multiroom AV, so theres no issue with adding more access points. The wifi spectrum is quite congested as I live very close to a large town centre. Some devices play fine with a secondary access point, others grind to a halt as they hold on to the first and don't switch. I haven't looked at it in detail, but I suspect either congestion or interference leads to the channel becoming congested rather then signal attenuation due to walls/distance and some devices don't handle such a scenario too well.

A mesh network is possibly a better answer then several access points in our scenario. And to be honest, amortised over several years of usage, given Wifi is one of the most used services in our home, £160 doesn't seem like much.
AshleyKingston

On mobile use Swifi to switch automatically without noticing.



But that is only your mobile phone, and it wont be switching seamlessly, you will still be disconnecting and reconnecting, you just do not visually see it.
youngsyp28th Jul

Playing devil's advocate, I'd question the need for these in most …Playing devil's advocate, I'd question the need for these in most residential properties. We live in a 2000 sq/ft 260 year old house with 1-3 ft thick stone walls in most places. I have a ZyXel VMG8924 (internal antennae) gateway at one end of the house and an Archer C7 (3 x external antennae) at the other end of the house, on the ground level, and we don't have any Wi-Fi black spots.I think part of the issue is the often mis-informed strive for 5GHz connectivity, when a decent 2.4GHz link will be more than enough bandwidth to transfer all the data most broadband connections can throughput, and offer less issues in the average home.Instead of spending £170 on this, most would be better off spending £60 on a reasonable cable router and 8 port GbE switch, then hard-wiring any static IP enabled kit and use the router as a wireless AP along with your gateway (assuming that's also wireless), strategically placed in the property, for your mobile kit.Paul

You haven't taken into account interference. If you live in a high density residential area, for example terraced housing or flats there are so many wireless devices about that using 2.4ghz is a fools game. Every channel is completely full, and the way wifi wrks means this has a detrimental effect on reliable connections and speed. It is much better to focus on low range 5ghz points at strategic locations around the home. If everyone did this there would be no problem with interference. If however you live far enough away from others interference isn't a problem then you are correct in your suggestion, but the number of devices using these frequencies are only going up so I do not think this is a long term solution.
saintagnes

I have just ditched all my wired PoE APs (4 of them as we have granite … I have just ditched all my wired PoE APs (4 of them as we have granite walls in Cornwall which are impervious to WiFi) and replaced them with 6 of these, all meshing nicely. The main advantage is not having to switch between different SSIDs around the place as I move around with my devices - it used to be a real pain disconnecting and reconnecting to get a better signal. I value this product enormously, and I have been through a lot of different options in the past! This is product is much more than a wireless extender, a powerline or a standalone access point.



I don't get this, why are you switching between SSID? I use two routers wired together (one set as an AP), located at different places in the house, and give both the same SSID, and my devices automatically switch between them as I move through the house. I'm not sure how a MESH network will give a different result (unless maybe comparing expensive business models with extra routing technology for a very large setup).

UPDATED

Just done some reading up... This hardware supports 802.11k/v, which will improve handover from one AP to the next, giving a better and more consistent service, but only if the device supports this protocol. Apple products are advertised as supporting the protocol, and Samsung Galaxy, but I'm struggling to find information. That said, I still wonder how much of a benefit you would see with only 3 APs compared to using 3 routers around the house.

Generally speaking though, you are getting 3 APs here that are AC2533 for £54 each... That's pretty good value.
Edited by: "Stu.C" 30th Jul 2017
Unless you live in Buckingham Palace, there is no way that anybody needs to spend anywhere near £60, net alone £160, to get complete 'seamless' Wi-Fi coverage in their house.
AdamBrunt

Unless you live in Buckingham Palace, there is no way that anybody needs … Unless you live in Buckingham Palace, there is no way that anybody needs to spend anywhere near £60, net alone £160, to get complete 'seamless' Wi-Fi coverage in their house.



Depends what you mean by seamless. I have a simple 3 bedroom semi house (the 70's type that are all over the country). At the front of the house I can get over 30MB/sec transfer however at the back of the house upstairs I only get 5MB/sec (sometimes as low as 2MB/sec. Yes, the signal from the BT Homehub 6 can reach all around the house, but I want decent performance all over so could quite easily see a use case for these, especially in larger houses.

Note the MB/sec to Mb/sec
Forgot to add we use Cisco AP's at work and they are terrible at handing over from one device to the other (and they are business grade).
15% discount and 4.2% with topcashback - think this might tempt me
12% cashback on Robert Dyas for Lloyds/Halifax customers too!

£161.49 minus 4.2% from TCB and minus 12% from Lloyds = £135.32
gone for it -
Yes but for mobiles it's a simple and cheap solution rather than mesh systems.
Much rather go for ubiquiti lites
Krizzo311 h, 38 m ago

Much rather go for ubiquiti lites


is that mesh?
Mentos

Distance and how much your walls attenuate the signal aren't the only … Distance and how much your walls attenuate the signal aren't the only factors you need to consider. You also have to consider number and type of devices, what people use them for, how they move around the house while using them, how well they switch between AP's, ability to wire the two AP's together, wether you can wire other devices (cable routing is usually challenging in residential properties) and number of devices competing for the same spectrum.

No matter how many AP's you have, the broadband bandwidth doesn't change. As I mentioned, on a decent 2.4GHz link, most people could move data around their LAN quicker than they could get it from the WAN to LAN. The rest of what your points just become more of an issue the greater the number APs you have, so I'm not sure what point you're trying to make.
Mentos

We live in a large town house, ~77sqm per floor and 3 floors. We have a … We live in a large town house, ~77sqm per floor and 3 floors. We have a central comms cupboard with CAT6 distributed around the house for multiroom AV, so theres no issue with adding more access points. The wifi spectrum is quite congested as I live very close to a large town centre. Some devices play fine with a secondary access point, others grind to a halt as they hold on to the first and don't switch. I haven't looked at it in detail, but I suspect either congestion or interference leads to the channel becoming congested rather then signal attenuation due to walls/distance and some devices don't handle such a scenario too well.

Again, I'm not sure what point you're trying to make. WiFi congestion is something that most just have to deal with these days and having a larger spectrum with less usage is the only real benefit of using a 5GHz capable device in a residential property. But the more people use 5GHz devices, the less of a benefit that will be.
Conversely, with the way that most use the 2.4GHz band, with a little savvy, you can avoid performance impacting congestion anyway. That's free!
And modern houses offer far less of an issue for decent WiFi coverage and performance than older properties. In our last house, a circa 2012 2 storey house, I had a single gateway (Billion 7800N external antennae) in the loft that covered the whole house for WiFi. These things just take a little thinking about.
Mentos

A mesh network is possibly a better answer then several access points in … A mesh network is possibly a better answer then several access points in our scenario. And to be honest, amortised over several years of usage, given Wifi is one of the most used services in our home, £160 doesn't seem like much.

If ultimate bandwidth is something you strive for then a mesh network isn't better, simply due to the way it works. It's only a slightly better solution than using WiFi extenders, which again, is a cheaper solution.

Paul
predatormc

You haven't taken into account interference. If you live in a high … You haven't taken into account interference. If you live in a high density residential area, for example terraced housing or flats there are so many wireless devices about that using 2.4ghz is a fools game. Every channel is completely full, and the way wifi wrks means this has a detrimental effect on reliable connections and speed. It is much better to focus on low range 5ghz points at strategic locations around the home. If everyone did this there would be no problem with interference. If however you live far enough away from others interference isn't a problem then you are correct in your suggestion, but the number of devices using these frequencies are only going up so I do not think this is a long term solution.

You missed the point. I wasn't suggesting to not buy a 5GHz compliant AP. You could comfortably get a decent 5GHz compliant gateway/ AP plus switch for the £60 I suggested. You'd be bonkers not to buy a 5GHz capable device if you were buying now
That aside, using the 5GHz spectrum will only be a possible solution for wireless congestion for a short time, until everyone does as you suggest. There are only 19 non-over lapping 5GHz channels we can use in the UK after all, IIRC.

Paul
youngsyp3 h, 53 m ago

No matter how many AP's you have, the broadband bandwidth doesn't change. …No matter how many AP's you have, the broadband bandwidth doesn't change. As I mentioned, on a decent 2.4GHz link, most people could move data around their LAN quicker than they could get it from the WAN to LAN. The rest of what your points just become more of an issue the greater the number APs you have, so I'm not sure what point you're trying to make. Again, I'm not sure what point you're trying to make. WiFi congestion is something that most just have to deal with these days and having a larger spectrum with less usage is the only real benefit of using a 5GHz capable device in a residential property. But the more people use 5GHz devices, the less of a benefit that will be.Conversely, with the way that most use the 2.4GHz band, with a little savvy, you can avoid performance impacting congestion anyway. That's free!And modern houses offer far less of an issue for decent WiFi coverage and performance than older properties. In our last house, a circa 2012 2 storey house, I had a single gateway (Billion 7800N external antennae) in the loft that covered the whole house for WiFi. These things just take a little thinking about. If ultimate bandwidth is something you strive for then a mesh network isn't better, simply due to the way it works. It's only a slightly better solution than using WiFi extenders, which again, is a cheaper solution.Paul


I think you have misunderstood the points I was raising. I wasn't at any point referring to throughput over a 2.4GHz network and/or its ability to saturate ones broadband bandwidth.

In fact I believe overall throughput is a secondary issue in the residential setting, particularly with asymmetric WAN bandwidth and limited usage cases where time is a critical factor. Once you are able to stream video/audio realtime, I doubt many (if anyone) worry much about throughput. A few extra minutes downloading a file aren't going to make a big difference, unless you do it very often.

I was addressing the assertion most would be better off (or no worse off) with multiple access points. And it is in relation to that I raised the points distance and signal attenuation by physical objects are not the only factors you have to consider. You've elaborated on this theme with your most recent example of your previous house. Again you've failed to consider many of us live in areas with high levels of congestion on the WIFI bands. And further that the points I raised are particularly pertinent in such scenarios, whilst they may not have been in your own specific case.

As you've said "i'm not sure what point you're trying to make" i'll try to be clearer, although please note I'm not trying to be facetious:

1) My points are in relation to having and maintaining a reliable connection, NOT throughput.

2) Your devices may switch between AP's reliably and the fact attenuation is the key issue in your scenario (those walls will likely have the benefit of blocking outside signals) may help with this.

3) Those of us who suffer from interference/congestion of the wifi spectrum have different challenges. In such scenarios some of my devices don't switch AP, instead they hold onto the first one. This results in traffic being severely throttled or worse still no network traffic with the user being oblivious.

4) If you utilise your Wifi network in a static manner (i.e sit in one place) utilising multiple AP's and the associated issues may not be a concern. If you wonder around the house whilst using devices (FaceTime/Spotify/mobile picking up work email/IM/ etc) instances where the connection drops or grinds to a halt because it hasn't switched will be more of an issue.

5) In some ways the multiple AP solution is easier to deploy in a consumer install. Routing backhaul cabling in a residential install can be challenging (many of us don't want cables on show, or drilling holes, lifting floor boards, running cables outside, etc) and standard wifi routers/AP's generally won't have secondary radios for backhaul or the ability to form a mesh (although if you can wire them some open source firmware can add the ability to form a mesh with old equipment).

6) I wasn't actually commenting on the benefits of 5.0GHz over 2.4GHz which you seem to be focussed on. But since you've mentioned one of the key advantages of the 5.0GHz band then dismissed it with spurious logic, i'll comment now. Yes the 5.0GHz band will become congested in the future, but you're using the network now. If using the 5.0GHz band buys you a year or two of trouble free wifi surfing then theres clearly a significant benefit to be had there. It's up to the consumer to balance how much they are prepared to pay for that benefit.

7) "Conversely, with the way that most use the 2.4GHz band, with a little savvy, you can avoid performance impacting congestion anyway." - How? If the 2.4 GHz band is heavily congested around you, how do you avoid that fundamental problem? Short of installing a Faraday cage, there's little you can do, aside from trying a mesh network or multiple AP's. If you're talking about re-assigning channels, that doesn't tend to be the magic bullet given most ISP provided routers are set to auto hop these days (for good reason, and by fixing your channel you're actually part of the problem). On some devices you can use third party firmware to increase the radio output, but this is illegal. And you'd still need high gain antenna's as you can't affect the user devices output. High gain antenna of course also amplify the interference So it all boils down to my first point, congestion is a fundamental issue that "savvy" can't overcome.

Now I don't know how much your time is worth. Or how much a reliable (note not fastest, but reliable) WIFI connection is worth. But amortised over several years of use, £160 doesn't seem unreasonable for a product like this, when balanced agains the fact WIFI is used by everyone in my house every day and for hours on end. Even if only a couple of more devices play nice with this setup against a multi AP solution its worthwhile IMO.

And thats before considering the time saved installing/configuring AP's (fortunately I already have CAT6 run around the house but others aren't so fortunate). Let alone the interventions when a neighbour gets a new router, or decides to be clever and changes channel manually, disturbing the finely balanced hornets nest that is the WIFI spectrum around me
Edited by: "Mentos" 1st Aug 2017
gary33330th Jul

Depends what you mean by seamless. I have a simple 3 bedroom semi house …Depends what you mean by seamless. I have a simple 3 bedroom semi house (the 70's type that are all over the country). At the front of the house I can get over 30MB/sec transfer however at the back of the house upstairs I only get 5MB/sec (sometimes as low as 2MB/sec. Yes, the signal from the BT Homehub 6 can reach all around the house, but I want decent performance all over so could quite easily see a use case for these, especially in larger houses.Note the MB/sec to Mb/sec



Most certainly there is a use case - but it is far cheaper to achieve than an apparently hot £160.
Stu.C30th Jul

I don't get this, why are you switching between SSID? I use two routers …I don't get this, why are you switching between SSID? I use two routers wired together (one set as an AP), located at different places in the house, and give both the same SSID, and my devices automatically switch between them as I move through the house. I'm not sure how a MESH network will give a different result (unless maybe comparing expensive business models with extra routing technology for a very large setup).UPDATEDJust done some reading up... This hardware supports 802.11k/v, which will improve handover from one AP to the next, giving a better and more consistent service, but only if the device supports this protocol. Apple products are advertised as supporting the protocol, and Samsung Galaxy, but I'm struggling to find information. That said, I still wonder how much of a benefit you would see with only 3 APs compared to using 3 routers around the house.Generally speaking though, you are getting 3 APs here that are AC2533 for £54 each... That's pretty good value.


I think I will defer to those on here with a greater knowledge of Wifi! My knowledge is sort of by trial and error over a decade of trying different ways to crack a home networking hub nut. I'm a techy at heart and I quite like trying new things out and learning from my experiences. What I found with my multiple Cisco PoEs was that it was much easier having them as separate SSIDs so that I could actually use some manual self-selection of the best connection depending on where I was in the house rather than hoping I had the best connection but more often than not was still locked onto another distant AP when using the same SSID but different channels 1-6-11 The disadvantage of using the different SSIDs was it was a pain forever disconnecting and manually connecting whenever I changed location and getting similar complaints from my user base (the family!).

We live in an old 1850s granite house where all the internal walls are the same as the external ones - rock hard and with no wifi penetration! I had used homeplugs previously which were good up to a point in the early days but became increasingly erratic with higher speeds and dodgy wiring and kids' phone chargers injecting noise.

Anyhow I quite liked the idea of the BT mesh and read some good reviews of its ability to hand the connection on and this seems to be borne out after buying three and installing them pretty easily. I am getting better coverage and better speeds than previously but with the quirks of the house I still had some issues so bought another set and now I have pretty good speeds throughout the house and garden on a single SSID. I think the product still needs a little working on - the app is pants really and only supports up to 4 discs. I have got 6 to work manually. I occasionally find I am locked onto another disc when clearly there is a better one but I suspect I need to fine tune the disc positioning over time. I almost certainly have paid a lot for this and have done Wifi cheaper in the past with cheap PoE APs / powerlines / Ethernet over TV coax etc, but if I factor in the time associated previously with running cable, fiddling around with random disconnects, resetting constantly and the complaints from the household then I think it is money well spent and probably a good network upgrade for the next few years at least.
Mentos1st Aug

3) Those of us who suffer from interference/congestion of the wifi …3) Those of us who suffer from interference/congestion of the wifi spectrum have different challenges. In such scenarios some of my devices don't switch AP, instead they hold onto the first one. This results in traffic being severely throttled or worse still no network traffic with the user being oblivious.



If your device does not support 802.11k/v then you might not see any improvement with a MESH network compared to several access points.


I also wonder, if everyone starts installing MESH networks, will general congestion get worse?


However, it is worth noting that this price is comparable to a single high end AC router.
Stu.C1 h, 50 m ago

If your device does not support 802.11k/v then you might not see any …If your device does not support 802.11k/v then you might not see any improvement with a MESH network compared to several access points.



802.11k/v compliant devices will clearly benefit the most. However, there's a very good chance legacy devices will also see a benefit. Firstly as a result of 802.11k/v client devices switching reliably to a more suitable AP and therefore freeing up AP's. Secondly as location of MESH AP's is only tied to accessibility of power sockets, in many cases that will allow more optimal location of AP's. Thirdly as MESH networks are dynamically self configuring, whereas several discrete AP's may well interfere with one another, let alone communicate and dynamically reconfigure to make optimal coverage of client devices.



Stu.C1 h, 50 m ago

.I also wonder, if everyone starts installing MESH networks, will general ….I also wonder, if everyone starts installing MESH networks, will general congestion get worse?



The available spectrum is finite, so there is a limit to the number of overlapping clients that can operate within that spectrum (barring advances in compression/efficiency/etc theres only so much data that can be pushed over the spectrum). However, the key bit people often miss is the word overlapping. Advances in embedded technology are allowing AP's and Wifi networks to become smarter. So in fact ubiquitous adoption of smart MESH networks, which can reconfigure and will eventually talk to neighbours, should help maximise utilisation of the available spectrum.

Currently dumb AP's, that take no consideration of whats around them, lead to a far from optimal use of the spectrum. And even the semi/smart ones that channel hop (admittedly not always done well) are over ridden by people that think they are being clever (I guess sometimes they have no choice if the router isn't working well on auto, or all your neighbours are doing the same). This simply leads to a mess and if you have the ability to scan whats around you it quickly becomes apparent a bit of intelligence on the part of AP's would make a world of difference.

For example why is my neighbours AP 4 doors down kicking out a signal all the way to me, once its replaced with something more intelligent we'll start to see beam forming and signal footprint tailored to connected clients rather then send out the strongest signal possible. This should then allow adjacent AP's to optimally assign channels to avoid one another, forming a mosaic similar to well planned mobile networks.


Stu.C1 h, 50 m ago

However, it is worth noting that this price is comparable to a single high …However, it is worth noting that this price is comparable to a single high end AC router.



They really cater to different needs. High end routers offer secondary benefits such as powerful firewalls, VPN servers/clients built in, low latency for gaming (for which you'd be wired), MU-MIMO, etc. Whilst peak output power is fixed by law, they can have high gain antenna's which can help with issues due to signal attenuation as a result of distance/physical barriers. They aren't the best solution for spectrum congestion related problems, in which case multiple AP's and preferably self configuring MESH AP's are a better answer.
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