BT Whole Home WIFI £250 (for 3 units) BT SHOP
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BT Whole Home WIFI £250 (for 3 units) BT SHOP

41
Found 29th Mar 2017
This is perhaps only of interest to those of us with "thick" walls but it does the job well (there are three units which work in tandem to provide a WIFI mesh that has a consistently higher throughput than a series of routers and repeaters can achieve.

Also very easy to set up! Here's the blurb:

Superfast, super-reliable Wi-Fi for every room. Whole Home Wi-Fi puts what matters most at your fingertips. It talks to your gadgets to make sure they're always automatically connected to the fastest and strongest signal. And it's bristling with brilliant controls that put you in charge of a supercharged home network. This is Wi-Fi at its finest.
You're in charge:

See who's online - a helpful dashboard to see how your network is being used and who's connected

Pause the internet - Want to get everyone down for dinner? Or get some time offline? Temporarily pause the internet with one tap

Disc lights too bright for your bedroom? - Turn them down, or off completely

Easy set up - With the app's guidance system setting up has never been easier, or more effective for getting Wi-Fi coverage throughout your home

Technical gremlins? - The app will spot - and explain how to fix them!

30 day money back guarantee - Get Wi-Fi in every room or your money back!*
 
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NB Looks like QUIDCO are currently offering a wapping 11% on BT branded items at the moment.
links not working.. will try to find it.
anyone tried this, our router is upstairs and ive been using the bt600 wifi powerline adapters and they are ok
Link should be fixed now, thanks for sharing rd3d2
essexgangsta

anyone tried this, our router is upstairs and ive been using the bt600 … anyone tried this, our router is upstairs and ive been using the bt600 wifi powerline adapters and they are ok



I have this myself and it is better than my previous solution which was a mix of power line adapters and repeaters. Less hassle for a better signal but it does cost more money than other solutions.
Same price at Maplin
joshm

Same price at Maplin



are you saying bt may be guilty of some price control shenanigans?
joshm

Same price at Maplin


11% Quidco from BT Shop. 4.4% Maplin. Amazon also matching price with same next day delivery as BT
essexgangsta

anyone tried this, our router is upstairs and ive been using the bt600 … anyone tried this, our router is upstairs and ive been using the bt600 wifi powerline adapters and they are ok


community.bt.com/t5/…721
Undercutting Google Wifi before it even launches - 6th April - £129 for one or £229 for a 2-pack
Steve353

Undercutting Google Wifi before it even launches - 6th April - £129 for … Undercutting Google Wifi before it even launches - 6th April - £129 for one or £229 for a 2-pack


£250 for three BT units is cheaper per unit than £229 for two - shame you can't currently buy a BT 2-pack or sell off the unwanted third unit as you can't currently add a fourth unit (so no market for buying spare units).
brookheather

£250 for three BT units is cheaper per unit than £229 for two - shame you … £250 for three BT units is cheaper per unit than £229 for two - shame you can't currently buy a BT 2-pack or sell off the unwanted third unit as you can't currently add a fourth unit (so no market for buying spare units).



​bt hubs do not have mesh capability, so waste of money.
northwales

​bt hubs do not have mesh capability, so waste of money.



You don't use the hub wifi at all with this setup - the mesh is created by the three units strategically positioned around your home.
rd3d2

NB Looks like QUIDCO are currently offering a wapping 11% on BT branded … NB Looks like QUIDCO are currently offering a wapping 11% on BT branded items at the moment.



Topcashback trumps Quidco - 12% on BT Branded
There are a number of MESH system either available now or coming soon:
I have the Linksys Velop system with 3 nodes. Really good mesh system for bigger homes.

I am downsizing so will be selling it, shame as we have only used it for around 2 months☹

Xx
might be worth holding fire for a while to see how google fair to the BT. Ive jsut had BT fibre installed and overall its better than Sky but some part of the house the wifi signal could be better
I have bt fibre but as we are on 3 floors and have a basement wifi was always going to be tricky.

With the Linksys Velop you set it up via an app like sonos sound systems so it is so easy. The app then keeps you informed if any of the nodes lose signal or if anyone has turned one off. They are really nice to look at and feel quality kit
can you fix them to the ceiling?
rd3d2

You don't use the hub wifi at all with this setup - the mesh is created … You don't use the hub wifi at all with this setup - the mesh is created by the three units strategically positioned around your home.



​yes but this system does have mesh capability. one is a main unit, other 2 are secondary. the 2 secondary only talk to main unit and not each other.

true mesh will allow any unit to talk to each other, so you could daisy chain mesh devices in a line and they all pass along the data.
I know the Velop need a power socket for each node so they are meant to be free standing on a desk or next to tv etc.

There are no fixings for mounting them.
ladymarmalade

I know the Velop need a power socket for each node so they are meant to … I know the Velop need a power socket for each node so they are meant to be free standing on a desk or next to tv etc.There are no fixings for mounting them.



Thanks, just thought it might be an elegant way of doing it.
northwales

​yes but this system does have mesh capability. one is a main unit, other … ​yes but this system does have mesh capability. one is a main unit, other 2 are secondary. the 2 secondary only talk to main unit and not each other.true mesh will allow any unit to talk to each other, so you could daisy chain mesh devices in a line and they all pass along the data.



​The BT system isn't mesh if all 3 don't connect to all 3. It's just standard repeaters.
the__cat

​The BT system isn't mesh if all 3 don't connect to all 3. It's just s … ​The BT system isn't mesh if all 3 don't connect to all 3. It's just standard repeaters.



No it's a Mish Mesh
the__cat

​The BT system isn't mesh if all 3 don't connect to all 3. It's just s … ​The BT system isn't mesh if all 3 don't connect to all 3. It's just standard repeaters.


No they have features such as roaming where it will move your device connection from one unit to another automatically if you get a better signal from another unit - you don't get that with repeaters and means you can move around the house without having to manually disconnect from a weak signal. Some routers have a roaming option where you can force a disconnection below a certain signal level - I use this on my main Asus router so it will drop connections below 70dB forcing a reconnection to a different access point in the house.
rd3d2

There are a number of MESH system either available now or coming soon:



I bought one of the Ubiquiti poe wifi AP last year and it is great.
thanks for posting, was holding out for Google Wifi, but as that is a complete rip-off in the uk compared to the US version I decided to go for this.

not sure why everyone has voted it cold, it's the best priced mesh system available (if you want 3 pods that is), hopefully quido will track then its £222.50, less than 2 google pods!, .
brookheather

No they have features such as roaming where it will move your device … No they have features such as roaming where it will move your device connection from one unit to another automatically if you get a better signal from another unit - you don't get that with repeaters and means you can move around the house without having to manually disconnect from a weak signal. Some routers have a roaming option where you can force a disconnection below a certain signal level - I use this on my main Asus router so it will drop connections below 70dB forcing a reconnection to a different access point in the house.



​Of all the subjects you could choose I think this is one where I don't need to be taught how to suck an egg.

Roaming is a client decision, not an AP decision. Repeaters or not, the client will automatically disconnect from one AP and connect to another if its RSSI drops below the configured threshold (within the driver typically) and a stronger signal from another AP is available which advertises the same SSID and security parameters. Of course, the AP dumping clients can have a similar effect but it's not as nice, given that the client threshold may not have been exceeded, meaning that the client may try to reconnect to the same AP. That introduces a period of disconnection which is often longer than client-based roaming.

Some systems use technologies such as 802.11r and 802.11k. Others use WDS. Each provides different ways to successfully roam. True repeaters can't use 11r or 11k as they don't share association and authentication info, but they can use WDS if their firmware supports it.
the__cat

​Of all the subjects you could choose I think this is one where I don't n … ​Of all the subjects you could choose I think this is one where I don't need to be taught how to suck an egg. Roaming is a client decision, not an AP decision. Repeaters or not, the client will automatically disconnect from one AP and connect to another if its RSSI drops below the configured threshold (within the driver typically) and a stronger signal from another AP is available which advertises the same SSID and security parameters. Of course, the AP dumping clients can have a similar effect but it's not as nice, given that the client threshold may not have been exceeded, meaning that the client may try to reconnect to the same AP. That introduces a period of disconnection which is often longer than client-based roaming. Some systems use technologies such as 802.11r and 802.11k. Others use WDS. Each provides different ways to successfully roam. True repeaters can't use 11r or 11k as they don't share association and authentication info, but they can use WDS if their firmware supports it.


I was stating that the BT Whole Home Wifi is more than just a standard repeater as repeaters don't communicate with each other to determine whether the client would get a better a signal with a different unit. The threshold that clients disconnect is typically quite low and so they can hold onto a poor signal when there might be a better signal available. Many mobile devices don't have configurable thresholds so you can't fine tune the roaming behaviour.
Edited by: "brookheather" 31st Mar 2017
brookheather

I was stating that the BT Whole Home Wifi is more than just a standard … I was stating that the BT Whole Home Wifi is more than just a standard repeater as repeaters don't communicate with each other to determine whether the client would get a better a signal with a different unit. The threshold that clients disconnect is typically quite low and so they can hold onto a poor signal when there might be a better signal available. Many mobile devices don't have configurable thresholds so you can't fine tune the roaming behaviour.



​Mesh APs wouldn't do that either. As I said, it's a client decision. The AP can only advise.
I've had a look at these and there's not much technical info about them. However, what I did find, was BT had actually tapped Mediatek to use their tech:

https://www.mediatek.com/blog/bt-whole-home-wi-fi-powered-by-mediatek

There's also a video on there that refers to the "mesh" system is actually Mediatek's own "adaptive network" tech which does feature network healing that seems like it will at least be mesh-like.

For myself, I'm not too bothered about all the mesh stuff as I was thinking of supplying an ethernet backhaul for each of the APs anyway.

I was more interested in the roaming features, and the specsheet says it does support 802.11v and 802.11k. However, there isn't much info on its available configuration apart from what looks like really basic stuff, so I would be worried being able to tweak it, like lowering the signal strength of an AP so that it encourages a client to roam quicker.


Edited by: "ma10" 31st Mar 2017
the__cat

​Mesh APs wouldn't do that either. As I said, it's a client decision. The … ​Mesh APs wouldn't do that either. As I said, it's a client decision. The AP can only advise.


Google Wifi implements 802.11r which implements AP-assisted client roaming - I don't know if the BT Whole Home Wifi implements this as well for assisting the hand-off from one AP to another.
brookheather

Google Wifi implements 802.11r which implements AP-assisted client … Google Wifi implements 802.11r which implements AP-assisted client roaming - I don't know if the BT Whole Home Wifi implements this as well for assisting the hand-off from one AP to another.



Do you have a link to it saying Google Wifi supports 802.11r? All I could find was that it officially supports 802.11s for its mesh functionality on the google security blog, but I couldn't find anything solid that says it supports any of the other standards i.e. 802.11r/k/v ?
brookheather

Google Wifi implements 802.11r which implements AP-assisted client … Google Wifi implements 802.11r which implements AP-assisted client roaming - I don't know if the BT Whole Home Wifi implements this as well for assisting the hand-off from one AP to another.



As you say, it's AP-assisted. I said that earlier. As part of the 802.11 standards, the decision to roam is ultimately in the hands of the client. If the AP sends deauths, etc, to the client in an attempt to make it look elsewhere, the client can still decide to go back to the original AP if it so chooses.

The APs need to communicate somehow, outside of the usual radio communication, in order to actually exchange client info. In a repeater scenario there's no communication between the APs other than normal radio communication / packet exchange unless something like WDS is used. Generally there's no co-ordination of client authentication though to be more exact. One AP connects to another AP while the client connects to the repeater which then "proxies" the client traffic, if you like. Some mesh networks also operate in this way, (although they usually have a dedicated radio for backhaul between APs), but the protocol doesn't automatically imply that there's a control mechanism such as a WLC or WDS-like technology to orchestrate the WLAN. The actual radio protocol doesn't do the client info exchange between APs though; that's a software feature.

In Cisco's Aironet infrastructure, for example, the Fast Transition feature uses 802.11r but it is confined to the mobility domain. This means that only APs attached to the same WLC or WLCs within the same administrative domain can share client info.

There are lots of limitations around how and when to use 802.11r, .11k, etc, in home as well as enterprise-grade networks. I refer to Cisco-based networks because I've installed them for years, but these limitations are there for valid technical reasons across the board unless proprietary protocols, etc, are used. We tend to stick to IEEE standards though and one of the limitations is that 802.11r specifically doesn't work on Cisco Mesh networks. I suppose that goes some way toward the argument that if fast-roaming is in use, mesh isn't the technology behind the product, while if it is in use, fast-roaming isn't in use.

There are two key things to remember. The first is that the client has to actually support 802.11r for fast-roaming to work and the second is that the client doesn't have to do what the AP advises in any case. That is part of the 802.11 standard.
I think this product is aimed at those of use who want a fast, effective and easy to implement solution to poor wifi - it's interface is simple, anything remotely complex is hidden - so probs not the right solution for those who like to tinker a lot.
the__cat

...We tend to stick to IEEE standards though and one of the limitations … ...We tend to stick to IEEE standards though and one of the limitations is that 802.11r specifically doesn't work on Cisco Mesh networks. I suppose that goes some way toward the argument that if fast-roaming is in use, mesh isn't the technology behind the product, while if it is in use, fast-roaming isn't in use.There are two key things to remember. The first is that the client has to actually support 802.11r for fast-roaming to work and the second is that the client doesn't have to do what the AP advises in any case. That is part of the 802.11 standard.



Eero is another one of these "mesh" wifi products. It uses their own proprietary mesh solution and does support 802.11r and plans for 802.11k in the pipework but admittedly, they haven't nailed down the full 802.11r implementation yet.

Isn't Cisco's Meraki a mesh networking product that also features 802.11r?
Edited by: "ma10" 31st Mar 2017
rd3d2

I think this product is aimed at those of use who want a fast, effective … I think this product is aimed at those of use who want a fast, effective and easy to implement solution to poor wifi - it's interface is simple, anything remotely complex is hidden - so probs not the right solution for those who like to tinker a lot.



It is but the problem is that while it's simple and easy, it's not as fully featured as the others e.g. Google Wifi and Eero can pause not only all internet, but it can pause specific devices and other features like Guest access. Also, you'll know they'll get Alexa or Google assistant sometime down the line as well...

So, BT's offering is like in between, new and simple over the traditional stuff, but not newer and fancier than the others...

If they don't lower the price then how will they sell more of these?

I mean, I can't imagine BT will spend too much time and effort adding loads of new features to compete with the new fangled stuff like Google Wifi and eero, but couldn't they add more traditional wireless router stuff to please the tinkerers?
Edited by: "ma10" 31st Mar 2017
Yes it does, but it works a bit differently to Aironet mesh. Meraki isn't a true mesh but more like a repeater topology where the AP can choose the best candidate to connect to in order to shift traffic. There's lots of scenarios that can be considered, each of which introduce their own challenges. An important thing to note is that for every repeater hop you lose 50% of the available bandwidth to that AP.
the__cat

​Of all the subjects you could choose I think this is one where I don't n … ​Of all the subjects you could choose I think this is one where I don't need to be taught how to suck an egg. Roaming is a client decision, not an AP decision. Repeaters or not, the client will automatically disconnect from one AP and connect to another if its RSSI drops below the configured threshold (within the driver typically) and a stronger signal from another AP is available which advertises the same SSID and security parameters. Of course, the AP dumping clients can have a similar effect but it's not as nice, given that the client threshold may not have been exceeded, meaning that the client may try to reconnect to the same AP. That introduces a period of disconnection which is often longer than client-based roaming. Some systems use technologies such as 802.11r and 802.11k. Others use WDS. Each provides different ways to successfully roam. True repeaters can't use 11r or 11k as they don't share association and authentication info, but they can use WDS if their firmware supports it.



Some cheat Such as Meru where it transmits a virtual BSSID that moves around physical radios or at least they used to not sure if the latest (Now fortinet BTW they got acquired) kit still does it that way
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