B'twin rock rider 500 mountain bike at decathlon £239
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B'twin rock rider 500 mountain bike at decathlon £239

7
Found 8th Apr 2015
B'twin rock rider 500 mountain bike from decathlon,
Good cheap entry level mountain bike with sram 24 speed gearing, front suspension forks, disc brakes, price dropped and big saving from 2014 price, now only £239.
Lifetime frame warranty.

7 Comments

In b4 can get one for £69 @ Tesco etc.

My only criticism other than the pedals (which I'd swap for clipless), is that the cable disc brakes might not be up to much and take a lot of fettling to keep going. Hydraulic is much better.

Edited by: "anewman" 8th Apr 2015

How much was previous price? Thanks

@anewman, Hydraulic is not better it it goes wrong, I would like the voodoo bantu from halfords but the only thing that puts me off is the hydraulic breaks, costly repair/parts outside of warranty.

POWYSWALES

@anewman, Hydraulic is not better it it goes wrong, I would like the … @anewman, Hydraulic is not better it it goes wrong, I would like the voodoo bantu from halfords but the only thing that puts me off is the hydraulic breaks, costly repair/parts outside of warranty.


I had a bike that came with Tektro Novelo (spelling?) mechanical brakes and they were terrible. Even after being adjusted twice by the bike shop and having time to wear in, they faded on long descents and got noisy - not a nice experience. I replaced them for Shimano hydraulic which were light years ahead. There's a reason the brakes and clutches in all modern cars are hydraulic. Cars used to have these operated by cable.

Remember a cable can stretch/snap as easily as a seal can go, and that hydraulic brakes are self-adjusting.

It doesn't take much to replace brakes, you can generally buy them pre-bled for about £50, so it's easier to just replace the whole assembly. You just remove the handlebar grips and the brake lever, and undo the two bolts holding the caliper to the frame and any clips holding the cable to the frame. Bolt the new one on - holding the brake lever while tightening the two bolts on the caliper helps keep it straight and centred. A torque wrench is best to get the torque right and one with a suitable range can be had for about £20 to £30. The more unnerving bit is shortening the cables, if this is necessary.

From what I have read the better mechanical brakes are Avid BB5 or better BB7.

Edited by: "anewman" 8th Apr 2015

anewman

I had a bike that came with Tektro Novelo (spelling?) mechanical brakes … I had a bike that came with Tektro Novelo (spelling?) mechanical brakes and they were terrible. Even after being adjusted twice by the bike shop and having time to wear in, they faded on long descents and got noisy - not a nice experience. I replaced them for Shimano hydraulic which were light years ahead. There's a reason the brakes and clutches in all modern cars are hydraulic. Cars used to have these operated by cable.Remember a cable can stretch/snap as easily as a seal can go, and that hydraulic brakes are self-adjusting.It doesn't take much to replace brakes, you can generally buy them pre-bled for about £50, so it's easier to just replace the whole assembly. You just remove the handlebar grips and the brake lever, and undo the two bolts holding the caliper to the frame and any clips holding the cable to the frame. Bolt the new one on - holding the brake lever while tightening the two bolts on the caliper helps keep it straight and centred. A torque wrench is best to get the torque right and one with a suitable range can be had for about £20 to £30. The more unnerving bit is shortening the cables, if this is necessary.From what I have read the better mechanical brakes are Avid BB5 or better BB7.


Yeh. You're right mate.

Hydraulic brakes won't go wrong unless they're fiddled with or if someone greases them. Very rarely they fail in which case its a warranty issue.

Mechanical are easier for the average bike enthusiast to fix if needed but as they're one sided, I.e. only one pad moves when braking then very soon the inside pad wears down and has to be manually adjusted in.

This is only my opinion, I work in a bike shop as a mechanic and have repaired and bled countless variations of brakes over the years.

Back to the bike, seems good for the money but like most of these bikes, they have a disclaimer on the lower left or right fork leg stating that they're only for leisure cross country, if you are going to do more than that then I'd suggest either buying a better bike or upgrading the parts as an when needed.


IanTurner

Back to the bike, seems good for the money but like most of these bikes, … Back to the bike, seems good for the money but like most of these bikes, they have a disclaimer on the lower left or right fork leg stating that they're only for leisure cross country


This bike does not have this disclaimer. B'Twin and Decathlon have advised the following:
Decathlon:
"The b'Twin Rockrider 500 Mountain Bike is perfect if you're looking to get into hitting the trails. With a lifetime warranty aluminium frame, front and rear disk brakes and a SRAM 24 speed drivetrain you can be confident that this bike is built to last.".
decathlon.co.uk/roc…tml

B'Twin:
"Designed for intensive mountain biking."
btwin.com/en/…tml

Also, I bought this bike for my youngest son as an entry level mtb and the fork (a B'Twin 80mm which is actually a Suntour XCT 80) is not great but built for XC MTB. The frame is good, the same frame used for their pricier hardtails, the cost differences come from the groupset (cassette, derailleurs, crank, shifters, brakes), the wheels, tyres etc. The 500 is a good base to build upon - X4 gearing is not great but very good to find on an entry level bike at this price point. This bike is robust enough to handle most requirements you would reasonably have for a hardtail. Jeremy reviewing the bike on the B-Twin page says it best:

"There are only two choices in this referendum: whether this bike is Good, or whether it is Great! But first of all, it is a bike, with characteristics that have lived with bikes for 120 years. Like us humans, they need attention from birth and a £200 bike is no different from a £2000 machine. The 'rentamoaner' who didn't notice in mile number one that pedals were loose or saddle was insecure only has himself to blame. All too easy though to pass it on and far easier than following rule no 1 for any new machine irrespective of price - take a few tools with you . In its 'stealth grey' colour scheme, the Rockrider 500 is a definite looker - surprisingly standing out among more conventional reds and blacks. In XL size, it overwhelms the competition with its sloping top tube and black finishing kit. Up close and personal, there are interesting and effective touches. the frame sections mix circular with elliptical with quadrilateral, giving a distinctly modern and sophisticated appearance. The three rear control cables run along the top of the top tube visible to the rider, keeping them out of harm or dirt's way and giving it a clear 'machine like' appearance as would befit a classic vintage airliner. On the trails, all the components stay firmly attached to the frame with no hint of rattling or shoddiness. There is only the slight hint of buzz from the steel riser handlebars, and that probably depends more on the riding surface than component quality. The saddle in grey plastic looks unforgiving and worthy of early upgrade: resist! It is surprisingly comfortable and mouldable to shape. The front suspension forks are adjustable for weight, though it would take a fall into a ravine to compress them fully - the forks are firm, by some standards solid, but well damped and amazingly gentle in action and reaction. The SRAM X4 drivetrain is a delight, giving positive and unmistakeably complete shifting on every change. Its indexing is perfect on both thumb-operated dual shifters. It is an entry level system, but the operating 'lag' reported in other reviews is not a hindrance, is in many ways a benefit and is consistent and endearing. When called upon, it will traverse any or all of its range of 24 gears effortlessly and without a jump. Wheels are bombproof double rimmed with standard knobbly tyres. They will handle all in their path without issue, taking mud, sand, uphills, downhills and gravel in their stride. All in all an excellent package. I have converted mine to B'Twin SPD pedals which I use with Rockrider shoes, adding to the tractive potency of the machine. At 14Kgs, is it weighty? Possibly, but it is an entry level bike. It has to put up with entry level people like me the committed roadie and all our imported incompetencies, so it carries its extra Kilo or so for good reason! No need to buy new as you improve though - that superb frame will take upgrades. We have a result - this is a GREAT bike!"
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