Buffalo LinkStation 210 3TB (1 x 3TB) 1-bay NAS Drive £79.98 @ Ebuyer
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Buffalo LinkStation 210 3TB (1 x 3TB) 1-bay NAS Drive £79.98 @ Ebuyer

33
Found 20th Dec 2015
For only an extra £8 over a regular external USB drive you can currently get the Buffalo NAS drive.

For those that aren't familiar a NAS drive attaches to your router via an ethernet cable and then can be accessed by any computer on your network and even let you access it's files over the internet.

While I'm a big fan of building these myself so I can get multiple drives, RAID and other functions included in the server, for shear simplicity you can't beat these ready to go devices and also for price you could never put together one for this little money.

A more in depth analysis can be viewed here where it's compared with the popular WD My Cloud:

youtube.com/wat…wdM

33 Comments

that's pretty good for 3TB's. Personally i'd always go for Synology devices, but 3TB's for £80 quid and a decent enough NAS is not bad at all. Heated.

Original Poster

HankHandsome

that's pretty good for 3TB's. Personally i'd always go for Synology … that's pretty good for 3TB's. Personally i'd always go for Synology devices, but 3TB's for £80 quid and a decent enough NAS is not bad at all. Heated.



For advanced features and performance I agree something like a Synology or even rolling your own with software like FreeNAS is miles ahead. But I'm seriously considering this as an offsite backup option for my own storage.

Something I can discretely setup round at my parents place and have my own system do remote offsite backups to for an added level of protection.

Something like that even the most basic Synology system would be overkill and expensive for.

Think the USB2 kills it for me when WD's My Cloud devices have USB3. Fair point this is a network device (so you'll hardly use USB), but USB can be handy when backing up the disk to another disk.

HankHandsome

that's pretty good for 3TB's. Personally i'd always go for Synology … that's pretty good for 3TB's. Personally i'd always go for Synology devices, but 3TB's for £80 quid and a decent enough NAS is not bad at all. Heated.


QNAP all the way, Synology are cool but hardware, performance and functionality wise they're falling behind..

Plus the new QNAPs have full ubuntu support now, plus Kodi, Chrome and Firefox among other things out the box. Just plug your keyboard , mouse and monitor up and away you go..

QNAP have better support and apps too, Synology is sketchy... X)

I like Xpenology though!

ukez

QNAP all the way, Synology are cool but hardware, performance and … QNAP all the way, Synology are cool but hardware, performance and functionality wise they're falling behind..Plus the new QNAPs have full ubuntu support now, plus Kodi, Chrome and Firefox among other things out the box. Just plug your keyboard , mouse and monitor up and away you go..QNAP have better support and apps too, Synology is sketchy... X)I like Xpenology though!



Synology support is anything but "sketchy". Have you even tried them ?

The QNAP Tas-168 certainly is impressive, but there are plenty of people who would disagree that Synology devices are being "left behind".

Original Poster

Gazzie

Think the USB2 kills it for me when WD's My Cloud devices have USB3. Fair … Think the USB2 kills it for me when WD's My Cloud devices have USB3. Fair point this is a network device (so you'll hardly use USB), but USB can be handy when backing up the disk to another disk.



In the real world that's the difference between 35mb/s over USB 2 and around 120mb/s over USB 3.

So if it were at 2tb it would take about 16 hours to back up over USB2 and about 5 hours over USB 3 for the initial full back up. But remember this is a plug in and forget device, and incremental backups from then on aren't going to be nearly as large. I don't think the speed is that critical for the backup over usb. And as in the youtube video I linked the speed is quicker accessing this over the network than the WD, which is where the performance is more relevant to actual usage.

Seems a good price for this but is it still fairly slow to transfer? The reason I am asking is because I do have an older Buffalo Linkstation 350Gb and it is painfully slow!

Original Poster

nilrem

Seems a good price for this but is it still fairly slow to transfer? The … Seems a good price for this but is it still fairly slow to transfer? The reason I am asking is because I do have an older Buffalo Linkstation 350Gb and it is painfully slow!



From the review around 50mb/s write and 100mb/s read over gigabit ethernet. Wireless would be slower but that's a bottleneck on the network not the drive.

Original Poster

wackypaki

http://store.westerndigital.com/store/wdeu/en_GB/DisplayAccesoryProductDetailsPage/ThemeID.22586100/WD_Outlet/My_Cloud_3TB_Recertified/productID.310451100/categoryId.69923100 not much more for a WD mycloud



That's not brand new it's recertified. Yeah it's a great price and given the WD My Cloud is considered easier to use I think a lot of people would be happy with it. But I don't know how confident I'd be of a recertified hard drive with only a 60 day guarantee. The Linkstation comes with a 2 year warranty.

BigYoSpeck

That's not brand new it's recertified. Yeah it's a great price and given … That's not brand new it's recertified. Yeah it's a great price and given the WD My Cloud is considered easier to use I think a lot of people would be happy with it. But I don't know how confident I'd be of a recertified hard drive with only a 60 day guarantee. The Linkstation comes with a 2 year warranty.



​yeah i see your point. warranty period is 6 months though. voted hot anyway cos its a cracking deal

Thanks to the OP for the intro to NAS drives for the uninitiated. I've been using regular external hard drives up until now, but want to make the transition to NAS drives. I'm hesitant because while I know my way around a computer, I don't know much about networking, and don't wanna buy a bit of kit I'll be unable to use. Apologies if these are daft questions but:
1) the difference between NAS and microserver - is the main difference ease of use? I gather the former is plug & play, while the latter is requires greater computing know-how?
2) Other than storage capacity, what should I look for when buying my first NAS, and what spec is considered broadly "good"? i.e. processor type, RAM etc.
3) What type of connections should a decent NAS drive have as essential?
4) Again, me being nervous about being out of my depth should I buy a NAS - are these really as simple to use as plug and play, or in reality do I need to go and read a few hefty beginner's guides in order to get started?
5) is it true that NAS drives have lower failure rates than regular external hard drives?

I appreciate that the answer to some of these questions would vary depending on exactly what I buy, and what I intend to use the kit for, but they're intended pretty broadly.

Many thanks in advance for any help.
Cheers.

Anyone know what drive is actually in this thing?

Original Poster

CupidS

Thanks to the OP for the intro to NAS drives for the uninitiated. I've … Thanks to the OP for the intro to NAS drives for the uninitiated. I've been using regular external hard drives up until now, but want to make the transition to NAS drives. I'm hesitant because while I know my way around a computer, I don't know much about networking, and don't wanna buy a bit of kit I'll be unable to use. Apologies if these are daft questions but:1) the difference between NAS and microserver - is the main difference ease of use? I gather the former is plug & play, while the latter is requires greater computing know-how?2) Other than storage capacity, what should I look for when buying my first NAS, and what spec is considered broadly "good"? i.e. processor type, RAM etc.3) What type of connections should a decent NAS drive have as essential?4) Again, me being nervous about being out of my depth should I buy a NAS - are these really as simple to use as plug and play, or in reality do I need to go and read a few hefty beginner's guides in order to get started?5) is it true that NAS drives have lower failure rates than regular external hard drives?I appreciate that the answer to some of these questions would vary depending on exactly what I buy, and what I intend to use the kit for, but they're intended pretty broadly.Many thanks in advance for any help.Cheers.



1. A NAS like this comes ready to use with propriety software designed around ease of use. Inside it's case is a regular 3.5" hardrive and a very low powered computer which acts as a file server and can be administered via a built in web page. A microserver is just a regular PC geared towards being used as a server on which you would either install a NAS oriented operating system like FreeNAS or anyother operating system you wanted and then configure the shared services you wanted for it. You can in fact run a server from any computer, my frist NAS was a small form factor Lenovo system bought from ebay for less than £20, two hard drives bunged in and then NAS4FREE run from a USB thumb drive.

2. This is entirely subjective. Go on the FreeNAS forums and they will tell you that minimum you need a multicore 64 bit processor, 8gb of ECC ram and 3 hard drives and more is better. Or you could plug something like this in and it may be all you ever need. This will be as effective as a USB hard drive, except you won't have to move it round the house, anything running on your network that can access either windows, apple, ftp or dlna will see the files you set up shared. I'd start with something like this, it's not a big investment given a regular 3tb USB drive is in the region of £70. Then if you find your needs growing beyond it you can step up to something more powerful and with multi drive RAID capabilities.

3. Gigabit ethernet for the NAS to attach to. Then depending on what you want to access it from it depends. My PC connects to the same gigabit switch my NAS is on and I get 100mb/s+ speed from it. From a wireless connection that can be anything down to 2mb/s depending on how far away or how many walls etc.. but that is still enough to stream HD video from it happily, I just wouldn't want to be uploading or downloading hundreds or gigabytes over wifi, stick to a wired gigabit connection for that.

4. Something like this will be straight forward with the interface designed to be as simple as possible, it'll have a quick start wizard or guide that will get you a basic share setup very easily. Once you get into building your own though it does get quite complex. Something like FreeNAS or NAS4FREE is going to take a while to get your head around and setup correctly if you're wanting things like share permissions, auto backup and other things. Again you don't have to dive in the deep end. A straight forward entry level device like this will get you quickly setup with network shared storage with very little effort. You can move on from there if you find there are other features you would like.

5. I don't know of any solid stats for that. This will have a seagate drive inside it, I don't know if it will be a NAS specific drive or just a regular desktop drive inside. What I will say is that most regular external drives probably suffer higher failure rate through user error. Unplugging it without using the safe to remove or unmount feature, moving it while it's powered up and carting it round will do it no favours for reliability. Something like this stashed away stationary next to the router and safely powered down whenever it needs to be will be as reliable as any hard drive. That is to say you can expect a failure rate around the 5% mark which is why you want this to either be your backup of your main drive, or an additional drive backing this up if it's your primary storage.

Edited by: "BigYoSpeck" 21st Dec 2015

BigYoSpeck - many thanks for taking the time to help out with all my questions, that was very useful and very much appreciated. thanks again for helping out!

Cheers!

CupidS

BigYoSpeck - many thanks for taking the time to help out with all my … BigYoSpeck - many thanks for taking the time to help out with all my questions, that was very useful and very much appreciated. thanks again for helping out!Cheers!



If this uses a 3TB Seagate drive avoid it..

If you want to get a decent NAS, buy an entry level min 2 bay Synology or QNAP NAS.

Choosing your NAS - Which company should you choose? Full Version

What is a NAS as Fast As Possible

RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 10 - All You Need to Know as Fast As Possible

ukez

If this uses a 3TB Seagate drive avoid it..


For every drive that has ever been made you will find scare stories on the net, there are only a few companies that actually make the drives and if you took notice of the comments you would never buy any drive, personally I have never had a Seagate drive fail but have had quite a few problems with WD drives but it would not stop me buying a WD drive.

nilrem

For every drive that has ever been made you will find scare stories on … For every drive that has ever been made you will find scare stories on the net, there are only a few companies that actually make the drives and if you took notice of the comments you would never buy any drive, personally I have never had a Seagate drive fail but have had quite a few problems with WD drives but it would not stop me buying a WD drive.



HUKD does seem to have a rather large contingent of people who believe that every piece of hardware they have will all fail at exactly the same time

Someone on the recent amazon marketplace thread reacted in sheer horror that i was buying a second hand 2TB portable hard drive :).

HankHandsome

HUKD does seem to have a rather large contingent of people who believe … HUKD does seem to have a rather large contingent of people who believe that every piece of hardware they have will all fail at exactly the same time :)Someone on the recent amazon marketplace thread reacted in sheer horror that i was buying a second hand 2TB portable hard drive :).


Indeed, about 2 yrs ago I bought some refurbished hard discs from Currys when they were selling them at silly low prices, people here warned how useless they would be, I bought 5 and all are still working perfectly!

nilrem

Indeed, about 2 yrs ago I bought some refurbished hard discs from Currys … Indeed, about 2 yrs ago I bought some refurbished hard discs from Currys when they were selling them at silly low prices, people here warned how useless they would be, I bought 5 and all are still working perfectly!



There you have it

Obviously the nature of things does mean that some drives do fail, but the frequency of this sort of thing is far, far less than some on here would have you believe.

Original Poster

nilrem

For every drive that has ever been made you will find scare stories on … For every drive that has ever been made you will find scare stories on the net, there are only a few companies that actually make the drives and if you took notice of the comments you would never buy any drive, personally I have never had a Seagate drive fail but have had quite a few problems with WD drives but it would not stop me buying a WD drive.



Seagate had some appalling failure rates on their 3tb drives a couple of years back to the point even I would have stayed clear of them until recently. Current stats are much more favourable though, back in the 5% ish range about the same as WD but still higher than toshiba and HGST.

Pricematched by Amazon. Ordered thanks.

If you're slightly technical try a Zyxel NAS

ukez

QNAP all the way, Synology are cool but hardware, performance and … QNAP all the way, Synology are cool but hardware, performance and functionality wise they're falling behind..Plus the new QNAPs have full ubuntu support now, plus Kodi, Chrome and Firefox among other things out the box. Just plug your keyboard , mouse and monitor up and away you go..QNAP have better support and apps too, Synology is sketchy... X)I like Xpenology though!



Have you tried qnap support before!? Also the firmware updates that they released over the years were far from impressive. Maybe they've sorted them out now but it use to be a case of update your firmware, cross your fingers and hope for the best

that is a good price that for 3TB

newbie question, do these things have to be left on 24/7? If not, can I just switch off at the mains each evening (as i do the router), or do you need to shut down like a PC? Thanks in advance for any advice.

shakerman

newbie question, do these things have to be left on 24/7? If not, can I … newbie question, do these things have to be left on 24/7? If not, can I just switch off at the mains each evening (as i do the router), or do you need to shut down like a PC? Thanks in advance for any advice.


They are normally left switched on, but then so are routers, my NAS and router only go off when there is a power cut.

Original Poster

shakerman

newbie question, do these things have to be left on 24/7? If not, can I … newbie question, do these things have to be left on 24/7? If not, can I just switch off at the mains each evening (as i do the router), or do you need to shut down like a PC? Thanks in advance for any advice.



Like a USB HD you can't just power it off it needs to be powered down properly. It has a switch on the back to go through the shutdown routine, don't ever just flick the wall switch with these or even with external USB hard drives.

It has setting for wake up and sleep times so you can set it to go to sleep each evening and come back on in the mornings without flicking switches though.

Are Buffalo using XFS on this one?

I'm looking at getting some type of network hard drive. all I want it for is to store pictures, videos, and music on for my family to access from mainly home on there phone / tablet. what device would be best ?

Original Poster

davidscowey

I'm looking at getting some type of network hard drive. all I want it for … I'm looking at getting some type of network hard drive. all I want it for is to store pictures, videos, and music on for my family to access from mainly home on there phone / tablet. what device would be best ?



There isn't a simple one size fits all solution to just recommend really. This deals device is the least expensive NAS solution I know of. What features is it lacking that you would like to have?

Would I be able to install subsonic on it? I know some synology devices have a package for that but I never owned a NAS so I don't know if the same could be fine for this one.

£105.27 now. was a great price at £70 odd.
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