Bushnell northstar motorised telescope. Half price @£124.50 at Wilkinson cameras.
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Bushnell northstar motorised telescope. Half price @£124.50 at Wilkinson cameras.

29
Refreshed 16th May (Posted 11th May)
Ok probably far from the best scopes available but looks good for the money. Also have a cheaper one for half price as well. Seems to be a lot more else where. Purchased to have play around with my daughters and try and get into astronomy with them.
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stethorn49 m ago

[Image] This thing is huge


What about the telescope?
Kulaak32 m ago

That does sound exciting. However seems you'll need the camera adapter …That does sound exciting. However seems you'll need the camera adapter for the Bushnell & a special T2 camera mount to attach the camera to the adapter which looks like another set back of £45 or so depending on camera mount cost.


I would recommend people ask on an astronomy forum about whether this is a good deal rather than going by 7 reviews on Amazon.

I voted cold because this is somewhere at the very bottom of something serious, the optics won't be good and you'd be much better buying binoculars and learning the night sky. I own a Goto myself but use my bins far more - and I'm an astro nut.

To the O/P, you can get adapters where you can attach a webcam or mobile phone and "video" whatever object (usually a planet or the Moon). There is free software that helps you choose the best images from the video and then stacks each image one on top of the other to get decent results. The Goto mount is good enough fo this type of image and worth trying. You can also hold your mobile phone or camera to the eyepiece and take photo's of the Moon, that costs nothing.

ebay.co.uk/itm…lR2

One thing I will say is NEVER point this at the Sun. I once pointed my 4" refractor at the Sun, knowing the dangers and melted an eyepiece. I knew never to look at it with the naked eye but even with the knowledge I had I thought projecting it would be safe - how wrong I was.
Edited by: "GlentoranMark" 11th May
willknot1 h, 10 m ago

Can you point me to the correct forum where I can ask about getting a …Can you point me to the correct forum where I can ask about getting a beginner telescope for a 12 year old kid (and me)


This is the forum you need - stargazerslounge.com/

Seek out your local astronomy club - astronomyclubs.co.uk/Clu…spx

I cannot recommend highly enough going to your local club, their knowledge and help is the best way into astronomy. Ask anyone who does astronomy, they will also say go to your local club.

The telescope here is a reflector telescope, they need setting up occasionally, a process called collimation. I would recommend a refractor for your first telescope as they don't need adjustment. Any computerised telescope isn't going to be much good at this price as the money needs to go into the optical parts.

firstlightoptics.com/beg…tml This is one of the best telescope suppliers in the UK.

Even then your local club is still the best place to start, go look through their telescopes first, you will get the possible start to stargazing.

Enjoy!
29 Comments
Original Poster
Just noticed you can also attach a DSLr to this as well , can’t wait to try that !
Think it's this model?

amazon.co.uk/Bus…sed

Not great reviews on Amazon.
Original Poster
Youngsyr2 m ago

Think it's this …Think it's this model?https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bushnell-788846-114x900mm-Motorized-Reflector/dp/B0000A0AIY/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1526063742&sr=8-2-fkmr0&keywords=Bushnell+northstar+motorised#customerReviewsNot great reviews on Amazon.



Yeah spotted those earlier but most complained about damaged boxes , etc. For the money decided to give it ago and it looks amazing when you look at it :-)
Original Poster
33782881-osT88.jpg
This thing is huge
stethorn49 m ago

[Image] This thing is huge


What about the telescope?
stethorn1 h, 18 m ago

Yeah spotted those earlier but most complained about damaged boxes , etc. …Yeah spotted those earlier but most complained about damaged boxes , etc. For the money decided to give it ago and it looks amazing when you look at it :-)


The thing that put me off was that the few good reviews were very generic and vague - makes me question how genuine/reliable they are.
stethorn3 h, 49 m ago

Just noticed you can also attach a DSLr to this as well , can’t wait to t …Just noticed you can also attach a DSLr to this as well , can’t wait to try that !


That does sound exciting. However seems you'll need the camera adapter for the Bushnell & a special T2 camera mount to attach the camera to the adapter which looks like another set back of £45 or so depending on camera mount cost.
Kulaak32 m ago

That does sound exciting. However seems you'll need the camera adapter …That does sound exciting. However seems you'll need the camera adapter for the Bushnell & a special T2 camera mount to attach the camera to the adapter which looks like another set back of £45 or so depending on camera mount cost.


I would recommend people ask on an astronomy forum about whether this is a good deal rather than going by 7 reviews on Amazon.

I voted cold because this is somewhere at the very bottom of something serious, the optics won't be good and you'd be much better buying binoculars and learning the night sky. I own a Goto myself but use my bins far more - and I'm an astro nut.

To the O/P, you can get adapters where you can attach a webcam or mobile phone and "video" whatever object (usually a planet or the Moon). There is free software that helps you choose the best images from the video and then stacks each image one on top of the other to get decent results. The Goto mount is good enough fo this type of image and worth trying. You can also hold your mobile phone or camera to the eyepiece and take photo's of the Moon, that costs nothing.

ebay.co.uk/itm…lR2

One thing I will say is NEVER point this at the Sun. I once pointed my 4" refractor at the Sun, knowing the dangers and melted an eyepiece. I knew never to look at it with the naked eye but even with the knowledge I had I thought projecting it would be safe - how wrong I was.
Edited by: "GlentoranMark" 11th May
Personally, for the money I'd recommend a pair of astronomical binoculars instead of this.
GlentoranMark6 h, 52 m ago

I would recommend people ask on an astronomy forum about whether this is a …I would recommend people ask on an astronomy forum about whether this is a good deal rather than going by 7 reviews on Amazon. I voted cold because this is somewhere at the very bottom of something serious, the optics won't be good and you'd be much better buying binoculars and learning the night sky. I own a Goto myself but use my bins far more - and I'm an astro nut.To the O/P, you can get adapters where you can attach a webcam or mobile phone and "video" whatever object (usually a planet or the Moon). There is free software that helps you choose the best images from the video and then stacks each image one on top of the other to get decent results. The Goto mount is good enough fo this type of image and worth trying. You can also hold your mobile phone or camera to the eyepiece and take photo's of the Moon, that costs nothing.https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Useful-Spotting-Scope-Telescope-Mount-Digital-Camera-Mobile-Phone-Adapter-GW/292308080378?epid=14008005462&hash=item440eeb56fa:g:PU8AAOSwILFZrlR2One thing I will say is NEVER point this at the Sun. I once pointed my 4" refractor at the Sun, knowing the dangers and melted an eyepiece. I knew never to look at it with the naked eye but even with the knowledge I had I thought projecting it would be safe - how wrong I was.


Can you point me to the correct forum where I can ask about getting a beginner telescope for a 12 year old kid (and me)
willknot1 h, 10 m ago

Can you point me to the correct forum where I can ask about getting a …Can you point me to the correct forum where I can ask about getting a beginner telescope for a 12 year old kid (and me)


This is the forum you need - stargazerslounge.com/

Seek out your local astronomy club - astronomyclubs.co.uk/Clu…spx

I cannot recommend highly enough going to your local club, their knowledge and help is the best way into astronomy. Ask anyone who does astronomy, they will also say go to your local club.

The telescope here is a reflector telescope, they need setting up occasionally, a process called collimation. I would recommend a refractor for your first telescope as they don't need adjustment. Any computerised telescope isn't going to be much good at this price as the money needs to go into the optical parts.

firstlightoptics.com/beg…tml This is one of the best telescope suppliers in the UK.

Even then your local club is still the best place to start, go look through their telescopes first, you will get the possible start to stargazing.

Enjoy!
All good info above.

On the face of it, for a goto scope that is a pretty good price, it is frustrating as a new user not knowing where things are in the sky so its a good help. And with cheaper wobbly manual mounts constantly having to adjust , and then wait for it to stop wobbling before taking a quick peak and doing it again is annoying - especially at larger 10+ focal length. I'm assuming alignment procedure is similar to my celestron SLT mount, in that case you'll soon be wanting to replace that red dot finder with something like a 50mm finderscope - assuming this mount can support that weight, looks a bit weedier than the SLT though.

Doesn't state the focal length is though on this, I'm assuming 7.8ish

And to temper expectations. You will not see any colour in space looking through the eyepiece. Infact, spend £10000 on a scope and you still won't see colour when looking at DSO. Everything will look like greyish smudges. More expensive larger aperture scopes will show more stars and brighter grey smudges.

Someone asked about attaching a DSLR. If you're attaching to the end of the scope, I wouldn't bother. The weight will be off (and its hard to get a proper balance). You could get adapters to attach the DSLR directly to the mount and use a kit lens, or piggy back rings so it sits on top of the scope. You can get ok results with this (brighter objects like m42 will look pretty good), but again you'll need someway to help with alignment (eg attach the red dot finder to the hot shoe), but then you'll need a laptop, software to help with focus and targetting, and balance the weight. Some nights you might find it works, other times its just frustration as the clouds roll in or tracking slips. Its a money pit if you want to do things properly and use an EQ mount

A webcam with barlow will work well with the moon, jupiter, saturn and mars depending on time of year. I build and sell a few cameras on ebay based on the ps3 eye cam as you have good control over exposure. I had good fun other year making a moon mosaic.

edit - doesn't look comparable to an slt mount, uses 9v battery so I'm guessing that rules out using a power bank (mine uses aa batteries which it chews through) and I doubt the motors will have the torque to shift anything more than the weight of the scope and view finder. However as a beginner scope I still think its pretty decent. Alternative would be something on a dobsonian base for £150 but you'll lose the goto tracking.
Edited by: "jaydeeuk1" 12th May
Original Poster
jaydeeuk111 m ago

All good info above.On the face of it, for a goto scope that is a pretty …All good info above.On the face of it, for a goto scope that is a pretty good price, it is frustrating as a new user not knowing where things are in the sky so its a good help. And with cheaper wobbly manual mounts constantly having to adjust , and then wait for it to stop wobbling before taking a quick peak and doing it again is annoying - especially at larger 10+ focal length. I'm assuming alignment procedure is similar to my celestron SLT mount, in that case you'll soon be wanting to replace that red dot finder with something like a 50mm finderscope - assuming this mount can support that weight, looks a bit weedier than the SLT though.Doesn't state the focal length is though on this, I'm assuming 7.8ishAnd to temper expectations. You will not see any colour in space looking through the eyepiece. Infact, spend £10000 on a scope and you still won't see colour when looking at DSO. Everything will look like greyish smudges. More expensive larger aperture scopes will show more stars and brighter grey smudges.Someone asked about attaching a DSLR. If you're attaching to the end of the scope, I wouldn't bother. The weight will be off (and its hard to get a proper balance). You could get adapters to attach the DSLR directly to the mount and use a kit lens, or piggy back rings so it sits on top of the scope. You can get ok results with this (brighter objects like m42 will look pretty good), but again you'll need someway to help with alignment (eg attach the red dot finder to the hot shoe), but then you'll need a laptop, software to help with focus and targetting, and balance the weight. Some nights you might find it works, other times its just frustration as the clouds roll in or tracking slips. Its a money pit if you want to do things properly and use an EQ mountA webcam with barlow will work well with the moon, jupiter, saturn and mars depending on time of year. I build and sell a few cameras on ebay based on the ps3 eye cam as you have good control over exposure. I had good fun other year making a moon mosaic.edit - doesn't look comparable to an slt mount, uses 9v battery so I'm guessing that rules out using a power bank (mine uses aa batteries which it chews through) and I doubt the motors will have the torque to shift anything more than the weight of the scope and view finder. However as a beginner scope I still think its pretty decent. Alternative would be something on a dobsonian base for £150 but you'll lose the goto tracking.




This is the only draw back so far, it’s too high for the kids to look through, easily rectified with a stool but the refractor I had in the past was always a night mare the eye piece would be that low.
33784811-5AVp1.jpg
Looks good! You'll soon find that the 4mm EP will be rubbish so stick to the 20mm.

You might have done this already but to save frustration on your first clear night you should focus the scope and get it aligned to the red dot finder during the day.

Take it outside and focus on something as far away as possible (Ideally on the moon if its around!), something on the horizon using the RDF. Now on the scope adjust the focus so you can see something (I think the image you see will be upside down). Once focused now try and adjust the RDF so the red light matches with what you're looking at.

You will need to refocus slightly at night but at least it will be easier if pointing at a bright star or planet as the scope will be nearly in focus and just need a tweak. Trying to focus something without knowing if its aligned with the RDF is difficult unless the moon is out so this will save you an hour of swearing.
Original Poster
jaydeeuk113 m ago

Looks good! You'll soon find that the 4mm EP will be rubbish so stick to …Looks good! You'll soon find that the 4mm EP will be rubbish so stick to the 20mm. You might have done this already but to save frustration on your first clear night you should focus the scope and get it aligned to the red dot finder during the day.Take it outside and focus on something as far away as possible (Ideally on the moon if its around!), something on the horizon using the RDF. Now on the scope adjust the focus so you can see something (I think the image you see will be upside down). Once focused now try and adjust the RDF so the red light matches with what you're looking at.You will need to refocus slightly at night but at least it will be easier if pointing at a bright star or planet as the scope will be nearly in focus and just need a tweak. Trying to focus something without knowing if its aligned with the RDF is difficult unless the moon is out so this will save you an hour of swearing.



Was shocked when I opened it to find no glass at the end of the scope, had to google to make sure it’s wasn’t faulty lol. Why will 4mm be rubbish ? Just not strong enough? They also give you a 3x extension tube.
stethorn14 m ago

Was shocked when I opened it to find no glass at the end of the scope, had …Was shocked when I opened it to find no glass at the end of the scope, had to google to make sure it’s wasn’t faulty lol. Why will 4mm be rubbish ? Just not strong enough? They also give you a 3x extension tube.


The 4mm will be like trying to peer in to a Capri sun straw and give a poor field of view. (Smaller the eye piece the greater the 'magnification' for want of a better word but they have poor eye relief) the 20mm will be ok. Perhaps look at plossl EP in future. I have a zoom eye piece which is fairly heavy but it's the only one I need. The 3x tube is a Barlow, basically makes changes the focal length for your eye pieces. Eg would make a 12mm ep equiv to a 4mm, a 30mm will be 10mm. If you're focused on Jupiter it might work ok with your 20mm EP and in theory should allow you to see more detail as the image will appear closer. I find a 3x Barlow too much for maksutov scope, might be ok with yours as it's a much shorter focal length.
You will need to refocus completely after inserting it so make sure your focused and tracking an object first.
Can this be used to look at people really far away
Original Poster
dsuk4 m ago

Can this be used to look at people really far away



You mean like the man on the moon ?
willknot7 h, 41 m ago

Can you point me to the correct forum where I can ask about getting a …Can you point me to the correct forum where I can ask about getting a beginner telescope for a 12 year old kid (and me)


Brilliant advice from @whathesmeg and @jaydeeuk1. I'll just add I'm on an Facebook Astronomy Group with 30,000 members where you can ask even the stupidest of questions although I think it would be better getting hands on an going to an Astronomy Club if you're considering purchasing as there's no one size fits all. As a decent scope will cost £300+ it's not a whim purchase imo.
stethorn3 h, 10 m ago

Was shocked when I opened it to find no glass at the end of the scope, had …Was shocked when I opened it to find no glass at the end of the scope, had to google to make sure it’s wasn’t faulty lol. Why will 4mm be rubbish ? Just not strong enough? They also give you a 3x extension tube.



Loved @jaydeeuk1 description of the straw as it's true. Every telescope has a maximum useful magnification where you won't gather any more information and you'll just magnify the faults in the telescope more. The 3x extension tube is called a Barlow Lens and it will magnify more but will be useless with that 4mm eyepiece. Where it might be of use is attaching a camera, phone or webcam without the eyepiece in place and taking photo's.

Agree about setting up in daytime and tweaking things. You should also level it and mark your spots because it can be tricky when dark. Levelling is important for the Goto to work properly.

Good luck with this and tell us what you've seen. Although it may not be the best scope you'd be surprised what you actually can view with it. Thanks to the Goto I've viewed Uranus and Neptune which I'd have struggled with on a Dobsonian.
Original Poster
GlentoranMark12th May

Brilliant advice from @whathesmeg and @jaydeeuk1. I'll just add I'm on an …Brilliant advice from @whathesmeg and @jaydeeuk1. I'll just add I'm on an Facebook Astronomy Group with 30,000 members where you can ask even the stupidest of questions although I think it would be better getting hands on an going to an Astronomy Club if you're considering purchasing as there's no one size fits all. As a decent scope will cost £300+ it's not a whim purchase imo.Loved @jaydeeuk1 description of the straw as it's true. Every telescope has a maximum useful magnification where you won't gather any more information and you'll just magnify the faults in the telescope more. The 3x extension tube is called a Barlow Lens and it will magnify more but will be useless with that 4mm eyepiece. Where it might be of use is attaching a camera, phone or webcam without the eyepiece in place and taking photo's.Agree about setting up in daytime and tweaking things. You should also level it and mark your spots because it can be tricky when dark. Levelling is important for the Goto to work properly.Good luck with this and tell us what you've seen. Although it may not be the best scope you'd be surprised what you actually can view with it. Thanks to the Goto I've viewed Uranus and Neptune which I'd have struggled with on a Dobsonian.



Will join that Facebook page, it really is something I want to get into and for my kids to enjoy as well. Been wanting a good scope for years but having 2 kids with cystic fibrosis means all my times took up with that. Spotted this scope is the store window for the past few months and when I spotted it down to £124 I thought I would give it ago, if we like it enough then will splash out a lot on one. Just need a clear night now and one that I am not too exhausted to do anything !
stethorn13 m ago

Will join that Facebook page, it really is something I want to get into …Will join that Facebook page, it really is something I want to get into and for my kids to enjoy as well. Been wanting a good scope for years but having 2 kids with cystic fibrosis means all my times took up with that. Spotted this scope is the store window for the past few months and when I spotted it down to £124 I thought I would give it ago, if we like it enough then will splash out a lot on one. Just need a clear night now and one that I am not too exhausted to do anything !



I have a passion for the subject but I'm more of a casual observer. I'll get my scope out in the coming weeks because Jupiter is at it's best but in all honesty I only use my scope maybe once a month. What I do use is my binoculars more because they don't need setting up and for a quick 5 or 10 minute session they are ideal. I found Mercury last month with my binoculars, something I've always struggled with but I used Venus to help find the planet. I'm very light polluted so that also doesn't help. Download an app or 2 to also help you find your way and listen/ watch/ read a sky guide to see what's well placed this month.

Lidl sell cheap binoculars from time to time and going by the forums they are decent quality for around £20. I own a pair along with a pair of 15x70's and can confirm they are good so keep an eye out to compliment your scope.

You do realise now you've bought a scope you will have 6 months of clouds? Although many Astronomers may not be religious, we all believe in the Sky Gods
Original Poster
GlentoranMark4 m ago

I have a passion for the subject but I'm more of a casual observer. I'll …I have a passion for the subject but I'm more of a casual observer. I'll get my scope out in the coming weeks because Jupiter is at it's best but in all honesty I only use my scope maybe once a month. What I do use is my binoculars more because they don't need setting up and for a quick 5 or 10 minute session they are ideal. I found Mercury last month with my binoculars, something I've always struggled with but I used Venus to help find the planet. I'm very light polluted so that also doesn't help. Download an app or 2 to also help you find your way and listen/ watch/ read a sky guide to see what's well placed this month. Lidl sell cheap binoculars from time to time and going by the forums they are decent quality for around £20. I own a pair along with a pair of 15x70's and can confirm they are good so keep an eye out to compliment your scope.You do realise now you've bought a scope you will have 6 months of clouds? Although many Astronomers may not be religious, we all believe in the Sky Gods



Yeah already getting the blame for the weather :-)
Original Poster
GlentoranMark1 h, 42 m ago

Brilliant advice from @whathesmeg and @jaydeeuk1. I'll just add I'm on an …Brilliant advice from @whathesmeg and @jaydeeuk1. I'll just add I'm on an Facebook Astronomy Group with 30,000 members where you can ask even the stupidest of questions although I think it would be better getting hands on an going to an Astronomy Club if you're considering purchasing as there's no one size fits all. As a decent scope will cost £300+ it's not a whim purchase imo.Loved @jaydeeuk1 description of the straw as it's true. Every telescope has a maximum useful magnification where you won't gather any more information and you'll just magnify the faults in the telescope more. The 3x extension tube is called a Barlow Lens and it will magnify more but will be useless with that 4mm eyepiece. Where it might be of use is attaching a camera, phone or webcam without the eyepiece in place and taking photo's.Agree about setting up in daytime and tweaking things. You should also level it and mark your spots because it can be tricky when dark. Levelling is important for the Goto to work properly.Good luck with this and tell us what you've seen. Although it may not be the best scope you'd be surprised what you actually can view with it. Thanks to the Goto I've viewed Uranus and Neptune which I'd have struggled with on a Dobsonian.



Been playing around aligning the red dot to the scope, simply put the telescope on a drain pipe of the house behind and then aligned the red dot. Then I decided to try the 4mm, it seems easy to see through but I just can’t get it to focus, is that because the subject is simply to closes for the lens?
stethorn30 m ago

Been playing around aligning the red dot to the scope, simply put the …Been playing around aligning the red dot to the scope, simply put the telescope on a drain pipe of the house behind and then aligned the red dot. Then I decided to try the 4mm, it seems easy to see through but I just can’t get it to focus, is that because the subject is simply to closes for the lens?



Does the 20mm work OK? You're trying to magnify at 225x which is really the maximum useful magnification for this scope. At this magnification it can be difficult to get a good focus and will be even harder at night when you have air turbulance to deal with on a faint object. Try and find something as far away as possible (not the Sun!!!)

One other point, if you have a spanner, tighten all the nuts around the tripod. When I first got my scope, doing this made an massive difference to keeping objects steady.
Original Poster
GlentoranMark30 m ago

Does the 20mm work OK? You're trying to magnify at 225x which is really …Does the 20mm work OK? You're trying to magnify at 225x which is really the maximum useful magnification for this scope. At this magnification it can be difficult to get a good focus and will be even harder at night when you have air turbulance to deal with on a faint object. Try and find something as far away as possible (not the Sun!!!) One other point, if you have a spanner, tighten all the nuts around the tripod. When I first got my scope, doing this made an massive difference to keeping objects steady.



20mm works great, 4mm you struggle to focus a little, what’s magnified more 20mm or 4mm, I have a feeling it’s simply too close to focus so need to wait for the moon to be visible ;-(
Divide the focal length, 900mm by the eyepiece focal length so 20mm will give you 45x and 4mm will give you 225x. If you add the Barlow you will get 135x and 675x. The 675x will be unusable but I bet you try it Your focuser is probably a rack and pinion (the same on most scopes) but it doesn't give fine adjustments, you will struggle at high magnifications to get things in focus. I try and focus on a star before turning to a planet.
Wilkinson's are very good. I buy my cleaning products and binbags from there at a very reasonable price. Heat added.
I bought a cheap telescope & was lucky enough to view the Milky Way. Mars was as clear as a bell. Galaxy was perfect until I unwrapped it & ate it.
My bf bought me a telescope for my upcoming birthday even if I'm not a guy (women don't tend to be into this stuff but I am).
Cost £129 but it is a Sky-Watcher Explorer-130 EQ2 Telescope.

I am still figuring out how to use it and I signed up to a stargazing forum to get some help.
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