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Business Class to Hong Kong Buy 1 Get 1 Free
Business Class to Hong Kong Buy 1 Get 1 Free

Business Class to Hong Kong Buy 1 Get 1 Free

Buy forBuy forBuy for£1,460
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If you fancy splashing out, or need to travel in style this is one for you.

Prices from £1,460 return inc. taxes (based on £650 o/w fare excluding tax)

Booking period: 6 March - 25 March 2007
Travel period: 6 March - 31 August
Bonus ticket travel period: to 25 October 2007

Terms & Conditions:
Fares are subject to government approval (LON-HKG one way fare is £769)
Payment must be made within 24 hours after flight confirmation.
A traveller who purchases a one-way business class ticket from £769 is entitled to a free business class ticket on the same itinerary (e.g. a free LON-HK ticket for a paid LON-HK ticket, a free LON-HK round trip ticket for a paid LON-HK round trip ticket)
The free ticket is transferable, valid for travel up to 25 Oct 2007, and must be booked via the Oasis Call Centre by quoting the booking reference number of the paid ticket.
Changes to the paid ticket:
Flight date change allowed free of charge 6 hours or more before scheduled departure time. No change request is accepted within 6 hours before departure
A fee of £70 applies to name change request received 6 hours or more before scheduled departure time. No change request is accepted within 6 hours before departure
A fee of £140 applies to flight cancellation
Fares include airport taxes, security charges, fuel surcharges and are correct at time of going to print. Both the paid and the free ticket are subject to relevant taxes and charges.
Offer is subject to seat availability
Valid for new purchases only.
Child fare is 75% and infant fare 15% of adult fare
Fares and offer terms and conditions are subject to change without prior notice.

11 Comments

Anyone tested this? I can't be bothered to go through the whole registration process to see if it works. It's quoting me full fares no matter what date I pick, so does it give you the free ticket at the end? No mention of it elsewhere.

EDIT: Never mind, I put fake details in, and right up to payment stage it's saying nothing about the free flight.

Original Poster

BristolDeal

Anyone tested this? I can't be bothered to go through the whole … Anyone tested this? I can't be bothered to go through the whole registration process to see if it works. It's quoting me full fares no matter what date I pick, so does it give you the free ticket at the end? No mention of it elsewhere.EDIT: Never mind, I put fake details in, and right up to payment stage it's saying nothing about the free flight.




Hey BristolDeal

It's detailed right there in the T&Cs (above) that you've got to call them quoting reference number of paid fare.

I ran dummy booking before posting and the o/w fare of £650 ex tax appeared on a number of dates, out and back.

[COLOR="Blue"][SIZE="3"]I don't like this part of the OP:[/SIZE][/COLOR]

Fares and offer terms and conditions are subject to change without prior notice.

Original Poster

jerry

[COLOR="Blue"][SIZE="3"]I don't like this part of the … [COLOR="Blue"][SIZE="3"]I don't like this part of the OP:[/SIZE][/COLOR]Fares and offer terms and conditions are subject to change without prior notice.




:?
That's surely just standard 'cover your arse' T&Cs... once you've booked it's binding.

asinover

:? That's surely just standard 'cover your arse' T&Cs... once you've … :? That's surely just standard 'cover your arse' T&Cs... once you've booked it's binding.




[COLOR="Blue"]Is it? Where does it state that then please?[/COLOR]

Original Poster

jerry

[COLOR="Blue"]Is it? Where does it state that then please?[/COLOR]



Hey Jerry

I think it's the 1929 Warsaw Convention on International Air Travel that essentially says once it's paid for and ticketed, that's a conclusion to the conditions attached, so while other factors might affect your travel, the airline can't suddenly demand more money from you.

I can't say for sure, but I'd certainly lay odds that the final condition above relates to them exercising a right not to agree to giving away any more free tickets without first issuing an email. But with 15 years air industry experience, what do I know?

asinover

the airline can't suddenly demand more money from you.



[COLOR="Blue"]Maybe not, but they can do as they put in their Terms and Conditions ie., [/COLOR]Fares and offer terms and conditions are subject to change without prior notice.

asinover

But with 15 years air industry experience, what do I know?



[COLOR="Blue"]Dunno, I only asked you where the offer states:[/COLOR]
asinover

:? That's surely just standard 'cover your arse' T&Cs... once you've … :? That's surely just standard 'cover your arse' T&Cs... once you've booked it's binding.



[COLOR="Blue"]I'll wait :whistling: [/COLOR]

Original Poster

Hey Jerry

:?

The offer doesn't say that it's binding once you've paid because that's just stating the obvious under their legal and social responsibilities. The equivalent to what you're implying is it's like buying a DFS sofa on 4 years free credit with nothing to pay for 12 months and a letter dropping through the door saying 'it'll now cost you another £50' the week after delivery.

Use your loaf, mate. Once an airline has your money and issued you with a ticket, that's it: deal done. Don't be so cynical and expect the worst of suppliers - there's such a thing as Trading Standards :-(

Banned

jerry stop being a loser. :giggle:

A merchant can write whatever it wants in its T&C's jerry but if it's against the law it is not binding. You cannot sign your legal rights away by agreeing to Terms and Conditions which are against the law. Not to say merchants don't try to push things as far as they can but in a case like this I think this is just standard special offer terms.

Original Poster

Admin

A merchant can write whatever it wants in its T&C's jerry but if it's … A merchant can write whatever it wants in its T&C's jerry but if it's against the law it is not binding. You cannot sign your legal rights away by agreeing to Terms and Conditions which are against the law. Not to say merchants don't try to push things as far as they can but in a case like this I think this is just standard special offer terms.



Thanks, Admin: your explanation is far more succinct than mine :thumbsup:
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