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Carbon Monoxide Alarm £12.99 each (3yrs warranty) @ LIDL instore
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Carbon Monoxide Alarm £12.99 each (3yrs warranty) @ LIDL instore

£12.99LIDL Deals
10
Posted 1st Sep 2019Available: National

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

Gives an early warning in the event of dangerously rising carbon monoxide levels
For rooms with a floor area of 20–40m²
Penetrating alarm tone with high volume, over 85 dB
With LCD display
Push button to test and stop the alarm
Sound warning when battery is running low
EN50291-1:2010+A1:2012 compliant
Sensor life: up to 7 years
Includes batteries (1 year life) and fixings
3-year warranty
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Top comments
bobo5301/09/2019 15:05

it is a product of methane gas combustion and does not matter how …it is a product of methane gas combustion and does not matter how efficiently it is burned it will still produce carbon monoxide which should be detected by an alarm.


I am a gas engineer, a gas cooker should not set off a carbon monoxide alarm unless it is burning badly, gas grills generally cause the most carbon monoxide as they tend to have the worst combustion as they normally heat metal to a glow.

You are right saying Carbon monoxide is a product of combustion but the levels required to set of an alarm would indicate severe combustion problems, a cooker with a good flame picture will produce hardly any carbon monoxide, we have special probes for our analysers we use over gas cookers and on gas fires to ensure they are within tolerances.

Carbon monoxide can be produced very quickly if it's recirculated and reburnt, this is why a cooker should only be fitted in a room with a door or window opening directly to outside and a door or window should always be opened for ventilation when in use. Cookers used for long periods in a room with no ventilation can start to produce a lot of carbon monoxide as it builds and is reburnt.

Lots of people have carbon monoxide detectors in kitchens and it's normal they are not set of each time the cooker is used.
Edited by: "kudos1uk" 1st Sep 2019
10 Comments
My question is: at what level they suppose to start to sound?? Tested one in the past, a good looking and expensive one from homebase. Tested on the top of the cooker with all the burners on and nothing happened (over 10kw energy at once), replaced but no help a all.
Could an expert tell us more and the way they should work?? No point to use one if cannot detect the slightest changes or some changes.
bobo5301/09/2019 08:28

My question is: at what level they suppose to start to sound?? Tested one …My question is: at what level they suppose to start to sound?? Tested one in the past, a good looking and expensive one from homebase. Tested on the top of the cooker with all the burners on and nothing happened (over 10kw energy at once), replaced but no help a all.Could an expert tell us more and the way they should work?? No point to use one if cannot detect the slightest changes or some changes.


I think you need to google carbon monoxide. Gas burners wont be producing Carbon monoxide- unless they're faulty.
Rich06901/09/2019 09:08

I think you need to google carbon monoxide. Gas burners wont be producing …I think you need to google carbon monoxide. Gas burners wont be producing Carbon monoxide- unless they're faulty.

it is a product of methane gas combustion and does not matter how efficiently it is burned it will still produce carbon monoxide which should be detected by an alarm.
bobo5301/09/2019 15:05

it is a product of methane gas combustion and does not matter how …it is a product of methane gas combustion and does not matter how efficiently it is burned it will still produce carbon monoxide which should be detected by an alarm.


I am a gas engineer, a gas cooker should not set off a carbon monoxide alarm unless it is burning badly, gas grills generally cause the most carbon monoxide as they tend to have the worst combustion as they normally heat metal to a glow.

You are right saying Carbon monoxide is a product of combustion but the levels required to set of an alarm would indicate severe combustion problems, a cooker with a good flame picture will produce hardly any carbon monoxide, we have special probes for our analysers we use over gas cookers and on gas fires to ensure they are within tolerances.

Carbon monoxide can be produced very quickly if it's recirculated and reburnt, this is why a cooker should only be fitted in a room with a door or window opening directly to outside and a door or window should always be opened for ventilation when in use. Cookers used for long periods in a room with no ventilation can start to produce a lot of carbon monoxide as it builds and is reburnt.

Lots of people have carbon monoxide detectors in kitchens and it's normal they are not set of each time the cooker is used.
Edited by: "kudos1uk" 1st Sep 2019
kudos1uk01/09/2019 16:35

I am a gas engineer, a gas cooker should not set off a carbon monoxide …I am a gas engineer, a gas cooker should not set off a carbon monoxide alarm unless it is burning badly, gas grills generally cause the most carbon monoxide as they tend to have the worst combustion as they normally heat metal to a glow. You are right saying Carbon monoxide is a product of combustion but the levels required to set of an alarm would indicate severe combustion problems, a cooker with a good flame picture will produce hardly any carbon monoxide, we have special probes for our analysers we use over gas cookers and on gas fires to ensure they are within tolerances.Carbon monoxide can be produced very quickly if it's recirculated and reburnt, this is why a cooker should only be fitted in a room with a door or window opening directly to outside and a door or window should always be opened for ventilation when in use. Cookers used for long periods in a room with no ventilation can start to produce a lot of carbon monoxide as it builds and is reburnt.Lots of people have carbon monoxide detectors in kitchens and it's normal they are not set of each time the cooker is used.


What about gas fires please. I have an old fire and I'm always worried about CM poisoning. I have a detector but always wonder if it's really working. How can you check if they are working.
Edited by: "nandito" 1st Sep 2019
I can't really advise anything other than getting it serviced and checked, there is no reason to think the detector is faulty but I do understand the fact it does not go off (like toast and a smoke alarm) makes you doubt it's working and the test button only tests its functioning not its accuracy of detecting carbon monoxide.

Open flued (traditional chimney flue) gas fires are the most vulnerable gas appliance, birds build nests in flues, you can get soot falls and even bricks come loose, all this in a room you relax and maybe nod off in front of the TV (without thinking it's unusual!).

My mate even rescued an owl fro behind a fire, I myself have removed several dead birds including a seagull.

If your gas flue is balanced flue, for example it has no chimney and the flue terminated outside directly behind the fire, it is very safe as its room sealed and very unlikely to have a carbon monoxide leak unless a seal or structure has failed.
kudos1uk01/09/2019 17:03

I can't really advise anything other than getting it serviced and checked, …I can't really advise anything other than getting it serviced and checked, there is no reason to think the detector is faulty but I do understand the fact it does not go off (like toast and a smoke alarm) makes you doubt it's working and the test button only tests its functioning not its accuracy of detecting carbon monoxide.Open flued (traditional chimney flue) gas fires are the most vulnerable gas appliance, birds build nests in flues, you can get soot falls and even bricks come loose, all this in a room you relax and maybe nod off in front of the TV (without thinking it's unusual!).My mate even rescued an owl fro behind a fire, I myself have removed several dead birds including a seagull.If your gas flue is balanced flue, for example it has no chimney and the flue terminated outside directly behind the fire, it is very safe as its room sealed and very unlikely to have a carbon monoxide leak unless a seal or structure has failed.


Thank you kudos
kudos1uk01/09/2019 16:35

Cookers used for long periods in a room with no ventilation can start to …Cookers used for long periods in a room with no ventilation can start to produce a lot of carbon monoxide as it builds and is reburnt.Lots of people have carbon monoxide detectors in kitchens and it's normal they are not set of each time the cooker is used.



Thank for the support first of all. Well, can see some jellowish/orange colour on my burners and therefore they are not for sure 100% ok. I got your point were you say that the detectors should not sound in the kitchen and that is correct to not trigger the detector due to the amount of time the burners are on and for the low KW output compared to a boiler as an example. But you must excuse me, in my TEST I am talking about 5 burners fully on and the detector just standing on the top at the extractor height (75cm) for about 15min. I am sure it should detect something and should sound otherwise they are really useless then. There must be a way to detect the slightest problem I think and I am sure that my test is actually been greatly amplified compared to the real usual average comsumption of gas.
From what you say then these detector are a waste of money as there is no way to know if an appliance is failing due to the short time it stays on
bobo5301/09/2019 15:05

it is a product of methane gas combustion and does not matter how …it is a product of methane gas combustion and does not matter how efficiently it is burned it will still produce carbon monoxide which should be detected by an alarm.


Are you confusing CO (carbon monoxide) with CO2 (Carbon dioxide)? The burning of natural gas, which is predominantly methane, should only produce CO2 or very small amounts of CO and water. Otherwise alarms would be going off all the time near boilers or cookers.
Edited by: "Rich069" 1st Sep 2019
bobo5301/09/2019 17:29

Thank for the support first of all. Well, can see some jellowish/orange …Thank for the support first of all. Well, can see some jellowish/orange colour on my burners and therefore they are not for sure 100% ok. I got your point were you say that the detectors should not sound in the kitchen and that is correct to not trigger the detector due to the amount of time the burners are on and for the low KW output compared to a boiler as an example. But you must excuse me, in my TEST I am talking about 5 burners fully on and the detector just standing on the top at the extractor height (75cm) for about 15min. I am sure it should detect something and should sound otherwise they are really useless then. There must be a way to detect the slightest problem I think and I am sure that my test is actually been greatly amplified compared to the real usual average comsumption of gas.From what you say then these detector are a waste of money as there is no way to know if an appliance is failing due to the short time it stays on




When we test a cooker it is also with all the rings oven and grill on, very little co (carbon monoxide) should be produced when it is burning correctly.

It really is not a waste of time, a person is very quickly overcome when things go wrong, lets say something spills in the oven onto the burner and you start getting incomplete combustion, the levels of co with multiply quickly and without you knowing or smelling anything you could be quickly overcome, that is what they are good for, when things are not normal and go wrong.

I believe everyone should fit one in every room with a cooker or open flued (traditional chimney), if you can afford it also fit them in rooms with a balanced flue boiler but these are much less likely to spill carbon monoxide.

Some appliances like a super sir (portable calor gas heater) have no flue but don't kill you, these appliances instead have what we call a vitiation device, the pilot shuts off and the appliance goes out if the carbon monoxide concentration increases. The fact you can run a super sir to heat a room with no flue shows an appliance that burns well produces little co.

Detectors are made so they do not sound when in a "safe" environment, I really don't know what levels they will start to sound (I got a feeling Kiddie ones with a display sound when they reach 100 ppm, im not 100% on that) but it would be silly to make them sound at the level expected in a kitchen containing a cooker, I know you said you placed it above the cooker but this really makes little difference. When you consider we are testing for a prolonged period directly on top of the cooker starting with everything on and not expecting over 90 ppm during the whole test (more complicated than that but use that as a baseline).

British Gas (in the old days before money became king to them) used to say co detectors were not necessary if an appliance is serviced regularly and they did not want co detector to take the place of servicing, in those days it really was not for the loss of revenue but they really did not want people to stop servicing and stick up a co detector. Nowadays the view is taken that they are so cheap you are mad not to have one and of course British Gas are a very different animal today and are happy to flog them at £40 a shot without a blink of an eye!
Edited by: "kudos1uk" 1st Sep 2019
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