Carrera Crossfire-E electric Bike at Halfords for £960
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Carrera Crossfire-E electric Bike at Halfords for £960

43
Found 26th Dec 2017
Gone down for the January sale from £1250
Finance also available with 0% intrest for £80 a month
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Don't forget, if your employer does the Cycle 2 Work scheme, now that this bike is under £1k, it's again available on that scheme. You'll end up saving about a 1/3 off for a normal tax payer (even more if higher rate tax payer), so it'll cost you about £650
frakison49 m ago

Can't see the point in these, if you want to cycle..... pedal? This is …Can't see the point in these, if you want to cycle..... pedal? This is like going to the gym, sitting down eating crisps and watching TV while you let someone else do your routine! Totally see the point for commuting, but as a leisure activity, you'd do yourself more good and save a fair bit with a self propelled bike


E-bikes are a great way to get back into cycling for the unfit/overweight who may otherwise be put off getting back onto a bike, especially for those living in hilly areas. They allow you to control how much assistance is required, starting off with lots of assistance, and as fitness improves, reducing the level provided by the battery (at the same time increasing the range). Getting out, enjoying the countryside, the feeling of freedom, that beats trying to get fit stuck in a gym

They are also great for those ex non powered bike cyclists with knee injuries etc that don't want to give up cycling (after an op for example)

I use mine mainly for commuting, and at weekends/touring holidays will use my road bike or hybrid (non powered), but there's much more to cycling than just getting fit.

It must be a British thing that associates cycling with predominantly fitness/sport. In Germany,for example, who are years ahead of us in the number of ebikes used and ridden by all ages, there's no hang up with using ebikes . They are considered a means of transport, no big deal. This year there will be over 680,000 ebikes sold in Germany. Ownership numbers in the UK are increasing significantly, but not helped by some attitudes that consider it 'cheating' or such like. My reply to those lycra clad roadies who shout 'Cheat!' to me on my daily commute to work as I pass them up the hill is 'carbon frame, skinny tyres, thats cheating !!'

Enjoy your cycling powered or not :-)
43 Comments
First off, these are really good e-bikes, had mine for about 6 months and no complaints at all.
The price now is pretty good, Halfords periodically discount their e-bikes, so if you can't afford it now, likely that you will see this price again in a few months.
Get an extra 10% off with British Cycling membership.
HOT
airbus3303 m ago

First off, these are really good e-bikes, had mine for about 6 months and …First off, these are really good e-bikes, had mine for about 6 months and no complaints at all.The price now is pretty good, Halfords periodically discount their e-bikes, so if you can't afford it now, likely that you will see this price again in a few months.Get an extra 10% off with British Cycling membership.HOT


how do I get the British Cycling membership? its £23/year, which would be offset with the 10% discount I guess.
How would it work?
Thanks
Get Fan membership, 19.80 online. Take membership card to Halfords when you order (doesn't work online as far as I know), get £96 off the bike. When I ordered the bike I showed them the email receipt from joining Brit Cyc and they accepted that as evidence.
djmalone19855 m ago

how do I get the British Cycling membership? its £23/year, which would be …how do I get the British Cycling membership? its £23/year, which would be offset with the 10% discount I guess.How would it work?Thanks


But 10% would be £96 and with the British cycling taking off, would effectively mean another £73 bringing it just under £900
I have this bike. It's great but there is a problem with 'cutting out'. Many people report it happening every 100 miles or so, you just need to reset the battery & it's OK again. Loads of discussions about it on the internet but halfords don't seem to be addressing the issue. Still a great bike though.
aint seen a halfords flash sale in a long time. Do they still have them?
Great bike, use mine daily to commute to work, and weekend trips out. I can get 50 mile range in Eco mode, and average 15 mph too. Commute to work, I put it on highest mode and arrive at work stress and sweat free and quicker than sat in traffic in the car. Had mine since Aug 2016, no problems (apart from the occasional well documented cut out ) and have only replaced the 1 set of brake pads in that time
Don't forget, if your employer does the Cycle 2 Work scheme, now that this bike is under £1k, it's again available on that scheme. You'll end up saving about a 1/3 off for a normal tax payer (even more if higher rate tax payer), so it'll cost you about £650
Original Poster
Thanks for the info! Just bought mine
Can't see the point in these, if you want to cycle..... pedal? This is like going to the gym, sitting down eating crisps and watching TV while you let someone else do your routine!

Totally see the point for commuting, but as a leisure activity, you'd do yourself more good and save a fair bit with a self propelled bike
flintstone4 h, 44 m ago

But 10% would be £96 and with the British cycling taking off, would …But 10% would be £96 and with the British cycling taking off, would effectively mean another £73 bringing it just under £900



If my understanding is correct, you can easily save £950*8%=£76 with gift cards through Zeek - zeek.me/gb/…ds/

EDIT - and this is on the top of other savings, i.e. £73+£900*8%=£145 theoretically
Edited by: "grumbler" 26th Dec 2017
Original Poster
frakison40 m ago

Can't see the point in these, if you want to cycle..... pedal? This is …Can't see the point in these, if you want to cycle..... pedal? This is like going to the gym, sitting down eating crisps and watching TV while you let someone else do your routine! Totally see the point for commuting, but as a leisure activity, you'd do yourself more good and save a fair bit with a self propelled bike


And from my understanding it's pedal assisted, doesn't do it for you. This will enable me and push me to go further cycling, and make going uphill easier. Don't plan to let it all do it for me
frakison49 m ago

Can't see the point in these, if you want to cycle..... pedal? This is …Can't see the point in these, if you want to cycle..... pedal? This is like going to the gym, sitting down eating crisps and watching TV while you let someone else do your routine! Totally see the point for commuting, but as a leisure activity, you'd do yourself more good and save a fair bit with a self propelled bike


E-bikes are a great way to get back into cycling for the unfit/overweight who may otherwise be put off getting back onto a bike, especially for those living in hilly areas. They allow you to control how much assistance is required, starting off with lots of assistance, and as fitness improves, reducing the level provided by the battery (at the same time increasing the range). Getting out, enjoying the countryside, the feeling of freedom, that beats trying to get fit stuck in a gym

They are also great for those ex non powered bike cyclists with knee injuries etc that don't want to give up cycling (after an op for example)

I use mine mainly for commuting, and at weekends/touring holidays will use my road bike or hybrid (non powered), but there's much more to cycling than just getting fit.

It must be a British thing that associates cycling with predominantly fitness/sport. In Germany,for example, who are years ahead of us in the number of ebikes used and ridden by all ages, there's no hang up with using ebikes . They are considered a means of transport, no big deal. This year there will be over 680,000 ebikes sold in Germany. Ownership numbers in the UK are increasing significantly, but not helped by some attitudes that consider it 'cheating' or such like. My reply to those lycra clad roadies who shout 'Cheat!' to me on my daily commute to work as I pass them up the hill is 'carbon frame, skinny tyres, thats cheating !!'

Enjoy your cycling powered or not :-)
Great post rugman
marcoroyes753220 m ago

And from my understanding it's pedal assisted, doesn't do it for you. This …And from my understanding it's pedal assisted, doesn't do it for you. This will enable me and push me to go further cycling, and make going uphill easier. Don't plan to let it all do it for me


If going further with little effort is your aim, surely a car/motorbike is a better option?
Cheers OP.

Would current owners say getting a spare battery was essential?

EDIT
====
Unfortunately, battery prices are a bit silly and appear to have been unavailable at times.
Edited by: "grazie" 26th Dec 2017
grumbler4 h, 47 m ago

If my understanding is correct, you can easily save £950*8%=£76 with gift c …If my understanding is correct, you can easily save £950*8%=£76 with gift cards through Zeek - https://www.zeek.me/gb/buy-gift-vouchers/halfords/EDIT - and this is on the top of other savings, i.e. £73+£900*8%=£145 theoretically


As far as I can see, you are limited to 2 or 3 vouchers of each denomination in a single transation. This is means multiple transactions or using 1 x £500 in the transaction, which only gives a 7% discount. There also appears to be a handling fee of about 1%. Still good though, so cheers for this.

EDIT
====
Also, your sums are bit out.

After the 10% British Cycling discount the bike costs £864. You then need to buy £850 worth of Zeek vouchers costing £787 and pay remaining £14 in store in whatever way suits you best. Total to pay is £801, which is a further 16.5% off the discounted price if you already have British Cycling membership or about 14.5% of you don't. Sum doesn't include the Zeek handling fee as I don't know what it is, but it seems to ebe about 1%.
Edited by: "grazie" 26th Dec 2017
Whats the hill assistance like? My commute is over one pig of a hill 18 mile round trip. My car commute is a total bind with traffic making it anything from 1.15 to 2 hours a day.. this would be tempting if I wasn't coughing up a lung on the gradients.. I'm fairly fit, but weight training is my bag.
grumbler1 h, 8 m ago

If my understanding is correct, you can easily save £950*8%=£76 with gift c …If my understanding is correct, you can easily save £950*8%=£76 with gift cards through Zeek - https://www.zeek.me/gb/buy-gift-vouchers/halfords/EDIT - and this is on the top of other savings, i.e. £73+£900*8%=£145 theoretically


Even better
CampGareth10 m ago

It disconnects the amount of effort you need to put in and the terrain …It disconnects the amount of effort you need to put in and the terrain type. You can ride up a hill totally relaxed or going flat out, it's your choice, unlike on a regular bike where the decision is made for you (flat out, unless you've got great range on your gears)


When I say that I can't understand the point of them, I don't mean the functionality What you're basically saying is that it takes all the effort (and health benefits) of riding a bike as a means of exercise? A cheaper way would be to just get an exercise bike and leave it on the lightest setting?
frakison13 m ago

When I say that I can't understand the point of them, I don't mean the …When I say that I can't understand the point of them, I don't mean the functionality What you're basically saying is that it takes all the effort (and health benefits) of riding a bike as a means of exercise? A cheaper way would be to just get an exercise bike and leave it on the lightest setting?


As rugman said before, most people around the world (and quite a few in the UK) don't cycle for exercise - we do it to get places a bit quicker than walking. If we burn a couple of extra calories that's fine but it's not the objective.
No mudguard/rack mounts! That's a great shame.

EDIT
------
Atfer reading the reviews by cyclists that know what they're talking about, I've decided against it myself. The harsh ride (common with aluminium frames), breaking spokes, motor cut-outs, flimsy controller and the difficulty in fitting full size mudguards or a pannier rack, dissuaded me.
Edited by: "grazie" 26th Dec 2017
frakison1 h, 53 m ago

When I say that I can't understand the point of them, I don't mean the …When I say that I can't understand the point of them, I don't mean the functionality What you're basically saying is that it takes all the effort (and health benefits) of riding a bike as a means of exercise? A cheaper way would be to just get an exercise bike and leave it on the lightest setting?


The benefit of an e-bike for new, returning and even current cyclists is that the motor takes a portion of the workload. Power assist e-bikes never do all the work. All but masochists dislike cycling uphill, so the power assist would be welcome to most. The downside of e-bikes of that they are heavier and less efficient than a well set up standard cycle.
Edited by: "grazie" 26th Dec 2017
grazie1 h, 9 m ago

The benefit of an e-bike for both new, returning and even current cyclists …The benefit of an e-bike for both new, returning and even current cyclists is that the motor takes a portion of the workload. Power assist e-bikes never do all the work. All but masochists like cycling uphill, so the power assist would be welcome to most. The downside of e-bikes of that they are heavier and less efficient than a well set up standard cycle.


Hills are where you get the most gain, you just have to work at it
grazie1 h, 18 m ago

No mudguard/rack mounts! That's a great shame.EDIT------Atfer reading the …No mudguard/rack mounts! That's a great shame.EDIT------Atfer reading the reviews by cyclists that know what they're talking about, I've decided against it myself. The harsh ride (common with aluminium frames), breaking spokes, motor cut-outs, flimsy controller and the difficulty in fitting full size mudguards or a pannier rack dissuaded me.


The Crossfire e has both pannier rack and mudguard mounts, here's a picture of mine, fully loaded. Oh and don't believe everything you hear or read, why not get down to halfords, to find out how they ride, they are more than happy to let you test ride one for an hour or so
32914848-hkFjb.jpg
Thanks for the extra info, rugman, which contradicts Halfords own specs.
grazie17 m ago

Thanks for the extra info, rugman, which contradicts Halfords own specs.


No problem grazie.. If you or anyone else needs any further info or advice on the Crossfire E just ask. Having ridden 4000 miles over the last 16 months on the bike in all weathers relatively trouble free, hopefully I should be able help
grazie3 h, 4 m ago

As far as I can see, you can are limited by the number of vouchers of …As far as I can see, you can are limited by the number of vouchers of denomination in a single transation, the maximum being 2, as far as I can see. This is means multiple transactions or using 1x £500 in the transaction which only gives a 7% discount. There also appears to be a handling fee of about 1%. Still good though, so cheers for this.EDIT====Also, your sums are bit out.After the 10% British Cycling discount the bike costs £864. You then need to buy £850 worth of Zeek vouchers costing £787 and pay remaining £14 in store in whatever way suits you best. Total to pay is £801, which is a further 16.5% off the discounted price if you already have British Cycling membership or about 14.5% of you don't. Sum doesn't include the Zeek handling fee as I don't know what it is, but it seems to ebe about 1%.


I just added £850 worth of cards to the basket for £781 as one £50 card was available for £45. The processing fee is shown as £0.30, that makes the actual discount £78.70 (8.1%)

ETA: £50 for £45 disappeared after refreshing. I've already seen this before and don't know how this works. Not a big deal, just £1
Edited by: "grumbler" 26th Dec 2017
A great bike when it works.

Mine gave "random" cutouts.

These can be annoying or dangerous depending on where they happen.

I returned mine for a full refund after it cutout twice whilst filtering to turn right on a 7% hill on a busy B road whilst fully laden with two panniers.
Picking mine up tomorrow. If they accept my British Cycling membership I should get it for £777.60 (£960 -10% Xmas code (HAPPYXMAS10) -10% British Cycling membership)

I've been keeping an eye on the price for the last 6 months as I know they knock 20% off from time to time. Bought a British Cycling membership soley for this reason.

If it does have frequent cutout problems I'll return it for a refund/replacement.
rugman5 h, 54 m ago

E-bikes are a great way to get back into cycling for the unfit/overweight …E-bikes are a great way to get back into cycling for the unfit/overweight who may otherwise be put off getting back onto a bike, especially for those living in hilly areas. They allow you to control how much assistance is required, starting off with lots of assistance, and as fitness improves, reducing the level provided by the battery (at the same time increasing the range). Getting out, enjoying the countryside, the feeling of freedom, that beats trying to get fit stuck in a gymThey are also great for those ex non powered bike cyclists with knee injuries etc that don't want to give up cycling (after an op for example)I use mine mainly for commuting, and at weekends/touring holidays will use my road bike or hybrid (non powered), but there's much more to cycling than just getting fit.It must be a British thing that associates cycling with predominantly fitness/sport. In Germany,for example, who are years ahead of us in the number of ebikes used and ridden by all ages, there's no hang up with using ebikes . They are considered a means of transport, no big deal. This year there will be over 680,000 ebikes sold in Germany. Ownership numbers in the UK are increasing significantly, but not helped by some attitudes that consider it 'cheating' or such like. My reply to those lycra clad roadies who shout 'Cheat!' to me on my daily commute to work as I pass them up the hill is 'carbon frame, skinny tyres, thats cheating !!'Enjoy your cycling powered or not :-)


Your comment made me see these in a completely different light. I don't cycle at all but I'd like to. The terrain around my home has discouraged me from getting a regular bicycle. My objective is pleasure, not exercise. I will definitely consider one of these now. Thank you!
rugman7 h, 22 m ago

Don't forget, if your employer does the Cycle 2 Work scheme, now that this …Don't forget, if your employer does the Cycle 2 Work scheme, now that this bike is under £1k, it's again available on that scheme. You'll end up saving about a 1/3 off for a normal tax payer (even more if higher rate tax payer), so it'll cost you about £650


Not 100% true. If the cycle to work scheme is managed properly, which most probably aren’t. While you save tax and NI each month on your payment. After 12 months you are either supposed to hand the bike back or pay a nominal value payment to keep the bike. Most schemes suggest the bike is worth about 15-25%, that you are then expected to pay.

Cycle to work schemes are more rental schemes than ownership ones. Also if you leave within a year. You have to pay up the rest in one payment out your wages and without the tax or NI benefit.
Just a note on the cutting out issue. The later version is less prone, but still does suffer this issue. I have had it happen once after hitting a pothole and I suspect dislodging the battery contacts momentarily. A push of the reset button and off again. I think it is reasonable to remember that this is a seriously cheap e-bike compared to what you can spend, so you get a lot for your money.

If you have any Topcashback money to pay out, Halfords vouchers give you a 10% uplift on top of your pay out value.

E-bikes vs trad bike opinions will go on for ever, but when you live in a part of the world with serious hills and knackered knees, they definitely encourage you to get riding more often. And you can control the amount of assist by turning it down! Plenty of opportunity for exercise with the electric motor off. Interesting to note that my local cycling group has two members who use e-bikes.
Edited by: "airbus330" 27th Dec 2017
rugman16 h, 32 m ago

No problem grazie.. If you or anyone else needs any further info or advice …No problem grazie.. If you or anyone else needs any further info or advice on the Crossfire E just ask. Having ridden 4000 miles over the last 16 months on the bike in all weathers relatively trouble free, hopefully I should be able help


Have you had a chance to compare yours to the Gtech? I did the 14 day Gtech trial 18 months ago and there was a lot about it I liked. It looks particularly smart in my opinion. However, I didn't like the belt drive which squeeked and they can't be lubricated apparently. Also, they only do one size for each crossbar version. The one with a crossbar was too big for me.

Not keen on the suspension forks on the Carrera, even without seeing them. Did the front forks take mudguard without alteration?
Edited by: "grazie" 27th Dec 2017
The only people that consider this a good ebike are those that have not tried others form companies that have been making them for years rather than this which is not much more than a regular cheap Carrera with a conversion kit put on it. For that price you can get a Freego or even a Wisper. Why do people keep falling for the Halfords con with their bikes?
grazie3 h, 27 m ago

Have you had a chance to compare yours to the Gtech? I did the 14 day …Have you had a chance to compare yours to the Gtech? I did the 14 day Gtech trial 18 months ago and there was a lot about it I liked. It looks particularly smart in my opinion. However, I didn't like the belt drive which squeeked and they can't be lubricated apparently. Also, they only do one size for each crossbar version. The one with a crossbar was too big for me.Not keen on the suspension forks on the Carrera, even without seeing them. Did the front forks take mudguard without alteration?


I've never ridden a gtech, seen a few about, and even followed a guy up the big hill on my commute a few months ago. He looked about 5 stone lighter than me and I was holding back from overtaking him, I wanted to see how much grunt it had. Maybe he had it in low setting. I do know they are popular, probably down to the simplicity of no gears, no oily chain to maintain, and relatively light, plus the (as you discovered) ability to try before you buy risk free

The suspension forks are standard fare at this price point, Suntour NVX, not the most sophisticated, but they do the job of soaking up the pot holed roads bumps without much complaints (they knock a bit if you get air lol).

Mudguards I use are SKS Velo 47 with stays kit ( tredz.co.uk/bik…+47 ). You'll need to buy a couple of brackets ( tredz.co.uk/.SK…htm ), which bolt onto the fork (they are holes ready in the fork). I've swapped the tyres from the stock Kendas to Schwalbe Energiser Plus 700 x 35 ( sjscycles.co.uk/tyr…22/ ), 1 puncture in 4000 miles, not bad, and the grip and roll really well... the mudguards cover the tyres well with some scope to go wider tyres
neostand49 m ago

The only people that consider this a good ebike are those that have not …The only people that consider this a good ebike are those that have not tried others form companies that have been making them for years rather than this which is not much more than a regular cheap Carrera with a conversion kit put on it. For that price you can get a Freego or even a Wisper. Why do people keep falling for the Halfords con with their bikes?


The equivalent Freego spec wise is the Eagle @ £1399
The equivalent Wisper spec wise is 905 torque crossbar@ £1599 (one size only)

I'd be happy with both above bikes, and they get great reviews/customer satisfaction, but the Crossfire-e is a lot cheaper when on offer.

I paid about £640 for mine last year, combining an offer of 20% off all bikes (the list price was £1k at the time), British Cycling discount, gift card discount and quidco. There's no other bike that comes close at that price point, and it has served me very well in all weathers for the last 16 months, and over 4K miles, and it still looks and rides great

I'd encourage anyone looking to buy an ebike is to go and try a few before buying. I got lucky with the Crossfire-e as it suited me at that price point at the time, and has served me well, and I wouldn't hesitate buying another, but if you can see the likes of Wisper, Freego and maybe some mid drive bikes and test ride them, make your own mind up, and if you are prepared to pay the extra go for it
Edited by: "rugman" 27th Dec 2017
I can't envisage how those brackets work. Think I'll take one for a test ride tomorrow as the forecast is good.
Edited by: "grazie" 1st Apr
neostand2 h, 37 m ago

The only people that consider this a good ebike are those that have not …The only people that consider this a good ebike are those that have not tried others form companies that have been making them for years rather than this which is not much more than a regular cheap Carrera with a conversion kit put on it. For that price you can get a Freego or even a Wisper. Why do people keep falling for the Halfords con with their bikes?


When I was looking at ebikes to buy, I hired a 3k Stromer, tested a Cube from the local specialist and there was nothing these bikes did that the Crossfire didn't. If you look on the Pedalecs forum all the 'branded' bikes have their particular problems too.
Ironically, the Freego Hawk is now on Halfords website for sale at 1099. I can't see any advantage over the Crossfire.
As far as Halfords are concerned, my nearest shop was useless and had no product knowledge or interest in the product, one a little further away were great and knew their stuff. About the same experience as visiting the local cycling specialist.
At this price point the Crossfire is a bargain, the Freego will probably be just as good, but more expensive.
The Freego Hawk at £1099 is pretty poor spec wise in comparison, cable disc at front, v-brake rear (crossfire-e hydraulic brakes front and rear), lower rated battery (10ah vs 11.6ah), very cheap top gun forks, and only one size frame available, compared to 3 sizes on the Crossfire-e
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