Carrera Parva Mens Hybrid Bike Tektro V-Brakes 21 Speed Gears 27.5" Inch Wheels £193.00 @ Halfords eBay store
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Carrera Parva Mens Hybrid Bike Tektro V-Brakes 21 Speed Gears 27.5" Inch Wheels £193.00 @ Halfords eBay store

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Found 26th Sep 2017
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I bought this for £186 just before the summer and it is a great bike. If you are a bike snob who wants something that is all singing and dancing then it is not for you. Maybe it doesn't have hydraulic brakes but who cares, we have managed without them for decades so why worry. it has a seat, handle bars, brakes and two wheels and goes where I point it. Job done. I would highly recommend one.
31 Comments
Dont think its a good deal at all.. no hydraulic brakes
linhang9052 m ago

Dont think its a good deal at all.. no hydraulic brakes

No, but they still stop the bike.
M_z1 h, 39 m ago

No, but they still stop the bike.

a PC with 1GB ram and celeron for £1000 will still enable you to browse the internet and youtube and to even game,but will you buy it? £200 for a bike with normal brakes.. nahh..
I bought this for £186 just before the summer and it is a great bike. If you are a bike snob who wants something that is all singing and dancing then it is not for you. Maybe it doesn't have hydraulic brakes but who cares, we have managed without them for decades so why worry. it has a seat, handle bars, brakes and two wheels and goes where I point it. Job done. I would highly recommend one.
linhang908 h, 54 m ago

a PC with 1GB ram and celeron for £1000 will still enable you to browse …a PC with 1GB ram and celeron for £1000 will still enable you to browse the internet and youtube and to even game,but will you buy it? £200 for a bike with normal brakes.. nahh..


£200 is a budget bike though, you don't expect much for it, apart from that it works. £1000 is not a budget PC. So your analogy is false I think.
Its more the difference between a refurbished Celeron with 2GB of RAM for £100, or 4GB of RAM for £110 - ie not much in it. If you want a decent one, you need more money. Otherwise, you have to compromise somewhere.
M_z1 h, 59 m ago

£200 is a budget bike though, you don't expect much for it, apart from …£200 is a budget bike though, you don't expect much for it, apart from that it works. £1000 is not a budget PC. So your analogy is false I think. Its more the difference between a refurbished Celeron with 2GB of RAM for £100, or 4GB of RAM for £110 - ie not much in it. If you want a decent one, you need more money. Otherwise, you have to compromise somewhere.

I admit that i did exaggerate.. but heres hotukdeals,u dont expect normal prices.. for a bike like this with normal brakes,u can just get it from tesco direct/argos or other retailers for less money. Got this for £99 from argos,its normal brakes too and it looks much cooler,costs only half of the price,full suspensions

32103149.jpg
Edited by: "linhang90" 27th Sep 2017
linhang9013 h, 34 m ago

Dont think its a good deal at all.. no hydraulic brakes


Hydraulic brakes are less reliable than mechanical disc brakes, need more careful setting up and have a higher incident of failure where you lose braking. Unless you have weak hands, arthritis etc most people should be happy with mechanical disc brakes on a road bike. Hydraulic is better suited to mountain biking which has you constantly braking. Even mountain biking some people prefer mechanical, a minority admittedly.

As stated on the other thread the Subway is a better choice. It has a freehub/cassette based drivetrain, mechanical disc brakes and a few other minor upgrades. The Parva is a cutdown version of the Subway replacing some parts with very low end components.
bonzobanana4 m ago

Hydraulic brakes are less reliable than mechanical disc brakes, need more …Hydraulic brakes are less reliable than mechanical disc brakes, need more careful setting up and have a higher incident of failure where you lose braking. Unless you have weak hands, arthritis etc most people should be happy with mechanical disc brakes on a road bike. Hydraulic is better suited to mountain biking which has you constantly braking. Even mountain biking some people prefer mechanical, a minority admittedly.As stated on the other thread the Subway is a better choice. It has a freehub/cassette based drivetrain, mechanical disc brakes and a few other minor upgrades. The Parva is a cutdown version of the Subway replacing some parts with very low end components.

Hydraulic brakes are less reliable then mechanical discs??????? Ok then 😖
davidmatthewbrown71 h, 7 m ago

Hydraulic brakes are less reliable then mechanical discs??????? Ok then …Hydraulic brakes are less reliable then mechanical discs??????? Ok then 😖


I'm hardly saying anything new or controversial, we aren't talking mountain bikes here. We are talking hybrids or road bikes. Even for mountain bike applications the difference isn't huge.

forums.mtbr.com/bra…tml

However for road bikes where you can be far away from home with few tools hydraulic brakes are a greater risk. The simplicity of mechanical disc brakes makes them more durable and easier to adjust and service for the home user with easily carried tools. The main benefit of hydraulic brakes is the lighter finger force required to get the same braking action which is a benefit if you are constantly braking off-road. However the downfall is a more complicated piston and hydraulic arrangement which must be kept sealed and is more complicated to service using additional tools and liquids. Lower end hydraulic systems are more prone to problems and do not age as well with seals failing with time. What seemed a good idea in year 1, maybe annoying in year 2 or 3. It's why road, cyclocross and hybrid bikes tend to keep to mechanical disc brakes unless you get to very high pricing but mountain bikes tend to use hydraulic disc brakes even at quite low end pricing.
bonzobanana3 h, 47 m ago

I'm hardly saying anything new or controversial, we aren't talking …I'm hardly saying anything new or controversial, we aren't talking mountain bikes here. We are talking hybrids or road bikes. Even for mountain bike applications the difference isn't huge.http://forums.mtbr.com/brake-time/poll-462-a.htmlHowever for road bikes where you can be far away from home with few tools hydraulic brakes are a greater risk. The simplicity of mechanical disc brakes makes them more durable and easier to adjust and service for the home user with easily carried tools. The main benefit of hydraulic brakes is the lighter finger force required to get the same braking action which is a benefit if you are constantly braking off-road. However the downfall is a more complicated piston and hydraulic arrangement which must be kept sealed and is more complicated to service using additional tools and liquids. Lower end hydraulic systems are more prone to problems and do not age as well with seals failing with time. What seemed a good idea in year 1, maybe annoying in year 2 or 3. It's why road, cyclocross and hybrid bikes tend to keep to mechanical disc brakes unless you get to very high pricing but mountain bikes tend to use hydraulic disc brakes even at quite low end pricing.

The only reason mechanical discs are every used is for cheapness and nothing else. Hydraulic discs give greater modulation which on smaller road contact surface area is hyper important or momentum will just make the rider loose control. Mechanical are very 'off and on' with little or no modulation. I would rather have rim brakes than 99% of mechanical discs out there.
Road, cross and hybrid bikes use mechanical discs for cheapness.
brettytopbanana9 h, 30 m ago

I bought this for £186 just before the summer and it is a great bike. If …I bought this for £186 just before the summer and it is a great bike. If you are a bike snob who wants something that is all singing and dancing then it is not for you. Maybe it doesn't have hydraulic brakes but who cares, we have managed without them for decades so why worry. it has a seat, handle bars, brakes and two wheels and goes where I point it. Job done. I would highly recommend one.


I agree with what you're saying though in my personally opinion this isn't the best bike for negotiating hills, it's a bit of a tank. For most cyclists speed and comfort are more important than flash gear. Mine is approx 8.8kg, this one is roughly 15kg. If you can afford it invest in a lighter one.
Edited by: "LemonHead" 27th Sep 2017
Is there a deal going on for Apollo Subway ?
msashok4 m ago

Is there a deal going on for Apollo Subway ?


I would wait for Black Friday deals,
How long is the warranty on this?
linhang906 h, 57 m ago

I admit that i did exaggerate.. but heres hotukdeals,u dont expect normal …I admit that i did exaggerate.. but heres hotukdeals,u dont expect normal prices.. for a bike like this with normal brakes,u can just get it from tesco direct/argos or other retailers for less money. Got this for £99 from argos,its normal brakes too and it looks much cooler,costs only half of the price,full suspensions[Image]



The op is a bike. A good budget bike for under £200.
That's a BSO.
Full suspension bikes rarely cost less than £1000. For £100 I wouldn't touch one.
Unless you're into downhill racing you're better off without full suspension (it just adds to the weight, absorbs energy and means less money was spent on other components). And I really wouldn't want to race downhill on the thing you posted.
davidmatthewbrown71 h, 56 m ago

The only reason mechanical discs are every used is for cheapness and …The only reason mechanical discs are every used is for cheapness and nothing else. Hydraulic discs give greater modulation which on smaller road contact surface area is hyper important or momentum will just make the rider loose control. Mechanical are very 'off and on' with little or no modulation. I would rather have rim brakes than 99% of mechanical discs out there.Road, cross and hybrid bikes use mechanical discs for cheapness.


Loads of reasons to buy mechanical disc brakes over hydraulic. However as previously stated there are more reasons for a road bike than a mountain bike. However even for a mountain bike many prefer mechanical. Just search youtube for mechanical vs hydraulic disc brakes as there are lots of videos giving real world evidence. Here's 2 but there are many more. Cheapness is a factor though not just for initial purchase but money saving in long term use. It's balancing hydraulic brake's superior modulation and lighter brake lever operation with a brake system that is much easier to live with and rely on. I've got a couple of bikes with hydraulic brake systems and I'm thinking of converting to mechanical. One is Shimano and one is Hayes.



LemonHead1 h, 36 m ago

I agree with what you're saying though in my personally opinion this isn't …I agree with what you're saying though in my personally opinion this isn't the best bike for negotiating hills, it's a bit of a tank. For most cyclists speed and comfort are more important than flash gear. Mine is approx 8.8kg, this one is roughly 15kg. If you can afford it invest in a lighter one.


I don't know what bike you have but 8.8kg doesn't sound like a hybrid bike, this one is nearer 13kg anyway.
msashok1 h, 33 m ago

Is there a deal going on for Apollo Subway ?


Subway is a model above this one in the Carrera range and Apollo is the brand used for low end bikes so would be a bike below the Parva if they do a hybrid bike in the Apollo range. If they do you probably wouldn't want it anyway as its likely to be rubbish with very low end components, barely fit for purpose.
It's a good deal. I got one of last year stock. It's the same bike only yellow and black. It's a cracking bike for running around town instead of getting the Santa Cruz out. The normal brakes as very good, At least I don't have to service them every year like the hydraulic ones.
bonzobanana51 m ago

I don't know what bike you have but 8.8kg doesn't sound like a hybrid …I don't know what bike you have but 8.8kg doesn't sound like a hybrid bike, this one is nearer 13kg anyway.


Of course, my mistake. Yes, and ideally for a hybrid you're looking at anything from 12kg - 15kg alright. I still (personally) would prefer a lighter one, 12kg maybe, if I were to get one though. Though that's not much different from the one posted above as you've pointed out.
Edited by: "LemonHead" 27th Sep 2017
bonzobanana14 h, 27 m ago

Loads of reasons to buy mechanical disc brakes over hydraulic. However as …Loads of reasons to buy mechanical disc brakes over hydraulic. However as previously stated there are more reasons for a road bike than a mountain bike. However even for a mountain bike many prefer mechanical. Just search youtube for mechanical vs hydraulic disc brakes as there are lots of videos giving real world evidence. Here's 2 but there are many more. Cheapness is a factor though not just for initial purchase but money saving in long term use. It's balancing hydraulic brake's superior modulation and lighter brake lever operation with a brake system that is much easier to live with and rely on. I've got a couple of bikes with hydraulic brake systems and I'm thinking of converting to mechanical. One is Shimano and one is Hayes. [Video] [Video]

And there are even more videos recommending hydraulic over mechanical! But there no way cable operated discs are in the same league as hydraulic discs. I have own/rode bikes with both and the ones I own all have hydraulic discs (which need next to no maintenance, unlike cable discs which suffer from inherent cable friction issues)
If u are thinking of moving from hydraulic to mechanical u must be the first cyclist I've ever spoken to who has.
davidmatthewbrown71 h, 13 m ago

And there are even more videos recommending hydraulic over mechanical! But …And there are even more videos recommending hydraulic over mechanical! But there no way cable operated discs are in the same league as hydraulic discs. I have own/rode bikes with both and the ones I own all have hydraulic discs (which need next to no maintenance, unlike cable discs which suffer from inherent cable friction issues) If u are thinking of moving from hydraulic to mechanical u must be the first cyclist I've ever spoken to who has.


I didn't prejudge it I just searched mechanical vs hydraulic disc brakes and most of the first videos that came up were more pro mechanical by default. Cable friction issues apart from the slightly greater pulling action required are not a problem in real terms in the same way they aren't an issue with V brakes or gearing. Loads of cyclists have moved from hydraulic to mechanical. Again though no one is saying hydraulic aren't superior for some applications but if your only criticism of mechanical disc brakes is cable friction then they must be doing something right. Clearly hydraulic brakes needing next to no maintenance is not the experience of many cyclists.
Hydraulic vs mechanical disk brakes argument on a thread about a sub £200 bike designed for road and cycle tracks - good grief!

I got one of these (women's version) for my daughter for school the other year for £140. My wife is after something similar, I've had a look around and I can't find anything with a better quality for this type of bike under £200.

The Carrera bikes are generally all very good quality and this is reasonable for the spec. It isn't a £1000+ mountain bike. I have one of those with hydraulic brakes and XTR groupset and they certainly don't need any of that nonsense. Neither do I really. Even compared to the Subway I'd probably pick this for £120 less as the component upgrades aren't earth shattering for the money.

If anyone can find a better (no, not a chinese pig-iron full-suss monstrosity with chocolate quality components) MTB style hybrid for £200 please let me know.
The Subway was only a £40 upgrade but as with the fluidity of Halfords pricing it is back up to £300 now. You say chocolate quality components but the Parva does have the basic freewheel gearing system as found on those cheap dual suspension bikes. It is the Subway that has a higher quality stronger cassette based drivetrain as well as disc brakes and a few other upgrades. At over £100 difference between Parva and Subway though the price difference is clearly less palatable. I personally would play the waiting game until the Subway is discounted again.
Yep, at £40 to upgrade it'd be a no-brainer at >£100 it is less so. Also, one caveat to my previous comment would be that the brake (and drivetrain) question certainly becomes more relevant if you are a 16 stone male (like me) and not a 8 stone woman like my wife.......
The tourney components on this are actually plenty good enough for light riding and work far better than I thought they would. Much better than the short of rubbish you'd have got at this level 10-15 years ago. A good example of the tech from the higher end stuff migrating down over time. When I say 'chocolate' I really mean some of the poor quality stamped mild steel stuff that you see on supermarket bikes and even on the Halfords Apollo range. Rusts easily and bolts bend and shear. When people cite <£100 bikes that is usually what you're getting and this is a step above that.
bonzobanana2 h, 22 m ago

I didn't prejudge it I just searched mechanical vs hydraulic disc brakes …I didn't prejudge it I just searched mechanical vs hydraulic disc brakes and most of the first videos that came up were more pro mechanical by default. Cable friction issues apart from the slightly greater pulling action required are not a problem in real terms in the same way they aren't an issue with V brakes or gearing. Loads of cyclists have moved from hydraulic to mechanical. Again though no one is saying hydraulic aren't superior for some applications but if your only criticism of mechanical disc brakes is cable friction then they must be doing something right. Clearly hydraulic brakes needing next to no maintenance is not the experience of many cyclists.

I did say the inherent issues of cables , which are many not just friction (wear, stretch and corroding to name a few) that's why they are being engineered out of cycle use (etap and DI2). The fact that mechanical discs are very 'off and on ' and 'notchy' , plus the moving actuator arm of most mech discs are exposed so also likely to oxidise/corrode reducing reliability. I do not know of one cyclist who has ever gone back to mechanical disc from hydraulic ever.
And not a argument 😃 just a friendly discussion with a fellow cyclist 🏻
davidmatthewbrown72 h, 40 m ago

I did say the inherent issues of cables , which are many not just friction …I did say the inherent issues of cables , which are many not just friction (wear, stretch and corroding to name a few) that's why they are being engineered out of cycle use (etap and DI2). The fact that mechanical discs are very 'off and on ' and 'notchy' , plus the moving actuator arm of most mech discs are exposed so also likely to oxidise/corrode reducing reliability. I do not know of one cyclist who has ever gone back to mechanical disc from hydraulic ever. And not a argument 😃 just a friendly discussion with a fellow cyclist 🏻


We will have to agree to differ as I think all our points have been raised although there are plenty of videos and forum postings of people who have gone from hydraulic to mechanical disc brakes including 1 of the video links I posted previously who seems very over the top of his dislike of hydraulic brakes. Cables are still a thing though on most bikes as far as I know for brakes and gears and unlikely to be replaced anytime soon.
claym0re4 h, 25 m ago

Yep, at £40 to upgrade it'd be a no-brainer at >£100 it is less so. Also, …Yep, at £40 to upgrade it'd be a no-brainer at >£100 it is less so. Also, one caveat to my previous comment would be that the brake (and drivetrain) question certainly becomes more relevant if you are a 16 stone male (like me) and not a 8 stone woman like my wife.......The tourney components on this are actually plenty good enough for light riding and work far better than I thought they would. Much better than the short of rubbish you'd have got at this level 10-15 years ago. A good example of the tech from the higher end stuff migrating down over time. When I say 'chocolate' I really mean some of the poor quality stamped mild steel stuff that you see on supermarket bikes and even on the Halfords Apollo range. Rusts easily and bolts bend and shear. When people cite <£100 bikes that is usually what you're getting and this is a step above that.


I'm no fan of tourney freewheels, I bought a cheap £60 mountain bike about 10 years ago, a 'Pagan Arrow' it was called and everything about it worked well and was super strong except the basic quality Shimano freewheel and tourney derailleur which needed constant attention. However I was 26 stone at the time and it had a trial by fire so to speak. I didn't stay long at 26 stone and pretty rapidly lost weight and was down to about 16 stone within the year. The issues I had were the front wheel bearings failing and bending the rear axle of the rear wheel when I hit a large pothole. However as you have pointed out a 8 stone woman is not really going to give a freewheel based drivetrain many issues. I'd agree about the wheel axles and nuts they are pretty awful on entry level bikes but still stronger than the low end quick release system which has hardened hollow axles. I always suggest either is replaced by solid hardened chromoly axle as sold by weldtite etc. Especially for a freewheel drivetrain bike where it considerably improves the strength and durability of those bikes although still not as good as having a cassette based drivetrain on the rear wheel.

Assuming the Parva doesn't already have a hardened chromoly rear axle that may be a good cheap upgrade in the future if your wife does somehow bend the rear axle but at 8 stone that would have to be a serious drop I would of thought to do so. Although it was mentioned on another recent hotukdeals thread that a child had destroyed the quick release axle on their diamondback bike but that was a mountain bike style bike and not hybrid. So may have taken some serious drops.
M_z26th Sep

No, but they still stop the bike.

I bought an old Subway for £25 with V brakes, better stopping power than my £800 disc clad road bike.
deathrider783 h, 51 m ago

I bought an old Subway for £25 with V brakes, better stopping power than …I bought an old Subway for £25 with V brakes, better stopping power than my £800 disc clad road bike.


I wouldn't doubt it. Some people buy 100% into the consumerist thing that the latest version is always the best and anything older is absolute rubbish. I just expect people to exercise their judgment a bit. The latest might be best, but the difference might only be marginal, so not paying a premium for. Or, it might just be a marketing gimmick to get people to part with their hard earned money.
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