Casio AP 250 Digital Piano from Normans Music for £379.05
283°Expired

Casio AP 250 Digital Piano from Normans Music for £379.05

28
Found 27th Dec 2015
Good mid range/ entry level digital piano (graded hammer action, good make, usual bells and whistles) with added benefit of a free 5 year warranty and next day delivery (+ free returns). Excellent choice for any beginner/ non-professional(assuming you can't afford a real piano).

Use code OFF5 for this price. Quidco and TCB both seem to give 5% off but this is not a validated code with them so not included in price.

Great reviews:
digitalpianoreviewguide.com/cas…ew/
azpianonews.blogspot.co.uk/201…tml

And videos:
youtube.com/wat…0s0
youtube.com/wat…HI0

An equivalent from Yamaha would be the YDP142 but would be about 30% more expensive. Alt options would be kawai kdp 90 for twice the price if that's the budget you're looking for. If you're going above this prob try and get a Yamaha U series piano rather than going digital
Community Updates

Groups

28 Comments
This is a great price for this piano...i paid £500 for this earlier this year.

Beginner level piano, but good value... especially at this price. Not enough quality here to suite advanced players, but you have to pay a lot more money to get that quality.
Anyone know if this includes the stand?
tonymk

Anyone know if this includes the stand?


It will do, because the whole structure requires it for strength. If it's anything like my YDP131 then it'll be upwards of 50KG.
Yes this includes the piano casing. Super price thanks for posting op.
Purchased a keyboard from Normans in the past month and service was excellent.
Topcashback 5.05%
How does this compare to the Yamaha YDP142?
Original Poster
I'd say the casio is slightly better than the ydp142 which is why normally the casio was more expensive even though it's a less well known make. The newer ap260 is about 10% more than the ydp142 and this is probably the last chance to get the ap 250 hence the great price
I bought a piano on a whim as you do, going to sell it now >

gear4music.com/Key…A9C

I'd say don't buy one on a whim, go test it first and make sure you're going to use it. I haven't really used mine at all. Apart from playing the demos on it which sound pretty good, a lot better than I can play anyway
HereKittyKitty

How does this compare to … How does this compare to this:http://www.gear4music.com/Keyboards-and-Pianos/SDP-4-Stage-Piano-and-Complete-Pack/19RG



I wouldn't touch a G4M branded piano.

Casio are solid nowadays, often better than the Yamaha equivalents which, In 10 years of working in music shop we only ever had 1 warranty issue with Casio celvianos and that was probably down to the courier dropping it.
With Yamaha we had endless issues, and they are a nightmare Co to deal with for returns.

This comes with a 3 year to-your-door warranty anyway, where if any fault does arise, someone will come round to sort it rather than have to ship back.

This model is good for a beginner, the sound source is the same as a lot of the more expensive ones, just less "bells+whistles" . Plug in headphones and it will sound and feel the same as pricier model.

This model has 2 x headphone outputs but doesn't have line-out. ( important for people that want to record from it) The newer model does have line-outs.


Edited by: "cRuNcHiE" 28th Dec 2015
cRuNcHiE

I wouldn't touch a G4M branded piano. Casio are solid nowadays, often … I wouldn't touch a G4M branded piano. Casio are solid nowadays, often better than the Yamaha equivalents which, In 10 years of working in music shop we only ever had 1 warranty issue with Casio celvianos and that was probably down to the courier dropping it.It comes with a 3 year to-your-door warranty anyway, where if any fault does arise, someone will come round to sort it rather than have to ship back.This model is good for a beginner, the sound source is the same as a lot of the more expensive ones, just less "bells+whistles" . Plug in headphones and it will sound and feel the same as pricier model. This model has 2 x headphone outputs but doesn't have line-out. ( important for people that want to record from it) The newer model does have line-outs.



It's a decent piano for the money if you want an electric baby grand. It's just a rebranded piano a GDP1000. As long as you can play, it plays and sounds fine >

youtube.com/wat…oeQ

Anyway I'm selling it for £550 and already got someone coming to see it on Saturday, so we'll see if it sells

youtube.com/wat…_OQ

I've decided I want a laser engraver for some hobby jobs I have, I gave the piano a go but I'm sticking with playing guitar.

If I was serious about playing the piano then I'd have shelled out £5,000 for one and done it properly. So just as a mess around I haven't lost too much on it.

I have loads of guitars one of my favourites is my Yamaha Pacifica 112L (left handed) from 1994, really well built and I've played it every day for 20+ years. I used to be really in to synths in the 80s, I had a chance to buy a Yamaha CS-80 (ex Hot Chocolate) synth in 1986 for £300, apart from it being quite a lot of money then, it was way too heavy to carry home on the train It will be worth a fortune now.


Edited by: "fishmaster" 28th Dec 2015
What colour is this piano? Black, or piano black?
u0421793

What colour is this piano? Black, or piano black?



Black with black stripes


its not a super shiny black, it has a wood texture laminate on it so that it looks more like a piece of furniture, rather that something than fell out of a cracker.

Edited by: "cRuNcHiE" 28th Dec 2015
u0421793

What colour is this piano? Black, or piano black?



It's bongo basil, which is a type of green.
http://asmademae.blog.com/files/2012/08/les-dawson-2.jpg
cRuNcHiE

I wouldn't touch a G4M branded piano. Casio are solid nowadays, often … I wouldn't touch a G4M branded piano. Casio are solid nowadays, often better than the Yamaha equivalents which, In 10 years of working in music shop we only ever had 1 warranty issue with Casio celvianos and that was probably down to the courier dropping it.With Yamaha we had endless issues, and they are a nightmare Co to deal with for returns.This comes with a 3 year to-your-door warranty anyway, where if any fault does arise, someone will come round to sort it rather than have to ship back.This model is good for a beginner, the sound source is the same as a lot of the more expensive ones, just less "bells+whistles" . Plug in headphones and it will sound and feel the same as pricier model. This model has 2 x headphone outputs but doesn't have line-out. ( important for people that want to record from it) The newer model does have line-outs.


Why not? G4M get great reviews
What colour are the keys?
Sorry- thought that was funny but just too much eggnog!
HereKittyKitty

Why not? G4M get great reviews



I don't know either, my piano seems decent, I was happy with it but in the 8 months I've had it I haven't played much, one of those things I was going to do, but never really got round to.
xboxone573

This is a great price for this piano...i paid £500 for this earlier this … This is a great price for this piano...i paid £500 for this earlier this year.Beginner level piano, but good value... especially at this price. Not enough quality here to suite advanced players, but you have to pay a lot more money to get that quality.




In what way is there 'not enough quality for advanced players' ?

What actually defines an 'advanced player'?

So long as the keys aren't too light so that when you do come to the real thing you aren't too fatigued. The other issue is whether they bounce when playing fast passages. Horrid when they unexpectedly hit your fingertips when you don't expect it!
Can't fault Normans, their aftersales is also superb.
Simon (from hireapianist.co.uk)
Try the Yamaha P45 as an alternative. it's an excellent beginner piano at half the cost.
My son currently has a Yamaha Piaggero NPV60 Digital Portable Piano and he is learning for his grade 5 exam now. All has been fine but before the exam he needs to go to a friends house to practice on a real piano (that is actually an electronic one like this but they can set the keys to "feel real") so that he is ready for the exam on a real piano. Is it worth the upgrade to this or is it overkill. I know grade 5 is neither very basic not extremely advanced (although it sounds pretty advanced to me!!). Any advice is appreciated.
Original Poster
[quote=feival]My son currently has a Yamaha Piaggero NPV60 Digital Portable Piano and he is learning for his grade 5 exam now. All has been fine but before the exam he needs to go to a friends house to practice on a real piano (that is actually an electronic one like this but they can set the keys to "feel real") so that he is ready for the exam on a real piano. Is it worth the upgrade to this or is it overkill. I know grade 5 is neither very basic not extremely advanced (although it sounds pretty advanced to me!!). Any advice is appreciated.[/quote.]

I think you can only get up to grade 6 using a digital piano (please double check with your examiner) so I would personally hold off and save for a second hand piano like a Yamaha U. Be prepared to put up with the noise of practice though!
Aha. Thank you!! Will check.
zchari5

[quote=feival]My son currently has a Yamaha Piaggero NPV60 Digital … [quote=feival]My son currently has a Yamaha Piaggero NPV60 Digital Portable Piano and he is learning for his grade 5 exam now. All has been fine but before the exam he needs to go to a friends house to practice on a real piano (that is actually an electronic one like this but they can set the keys to "feel real") so that he is ready for the exam on a real piano. Is it worth the upgrade to this or is it overkill. I know grade 5 is neither very basic not extremely advanced (although it sounds pretty advanced to me!!). Any advice is appreciated.[/quote.]I think you can only get up to grade 6 using a digital piano[quote=zchari5][quote=feival]My son currently has a Yamaha Piaggero NPV60 Digital Portable Piano and he is learning for his grade 5 exam now. All has been fine but before the exam he needs to go to a friends house to practice on a real piano (that is actually an electronic one like this but they can set the keys to "feel real") so that he is ready for the exam on a real piano. Is it worth the upgrade to this or is it overkill. I know grade 5 is neither very basic not extremely advanced (although it sounds pretty advanced to me!!). Any advice is appreciated.[/quote.]I think you can only get up to grade 6 using a digital piano (please double check with your examiner)


That all depends on the digital piano, cheaper ones i.e this one can only differentiate between a certain number of dynamics (how slow you push the key for soft notes or push faster for louder notes) more expensive digital pianos have a larger range.

Edited by: "paulj48" 30th Dec 2015
Original Poster
paulj48

That all depends on the digital piano, cheaper ones i.e this one can only … That all depends on the digital piano, cheaper ones i.e this one can only differentiate between a certain number of dynamics (how slow you push the key for soft notes or push faster for louder notes) more expensive digital pianos have a larger range.



Having looked on the ABRSM website Paul appears right (ie Grade 7 reuirements specifically say digital pianos are ok and this particualrly one should be fine based on the specifications they have below:

Piano Grade 6Information & Regulations|Exam marking criteria|Syllabus FAQ
2015 & 2016Piano
Piano Grade 6 exams consist of three pieces, chosen by the candidate from the appropriate lists in the current syllabus, scales and arpeggios, sight-reading and aural tests.

Total marks in all individual Practical exams are 150. 100 marks are required to achieve Pass, 120 marks to pass with Merit and 130 marks to pass with Distinction.

DOWNLOAD 2015 & 2016 SYLLABUS
Syllabus overlap information
Piano Grade 6 (2015 & 2016)
Piano requirements and information
Subject code: 01
The Piano requirements and information provide a summary of the most important points that teachers and candidates need to know when taking ABRSM Piano exams.

They are detailed within the exam sections below (Pieces, Scales and arpeggios, Sight-reading and Aural tests), immediately after the grade-specific requirements, and are available to download here.

Download full Piano requirements and information (PDF)
Further details, as well as administrative information relating to the exams, are given in ABRSM’s Information & Regulations which should be read before an exam booking is made.

Eligibility
There are eight grades for Piano and candidates may be entered in any grade irrespective of age and without previously having taken any other grade in Piano. Candidates for a Grade 6, 7 or 8 exam must already have passed ABRSM Grade 5 (or above) in Music Theory, Practical Musicianship or a solo Jazz subject; for full details, including a list of accepted alternatives, see Regulation 1d.

Instruments
ABRSM Centres provide a piano suitable for exam purposes. The piano will be upright or grand. Practice before the exam cannot be arranged, but examiners will recognize that the instrument may be one to which candidates are unaccustomed. When exams are held at Visits (i.e. premises provided by the Applicant and visited by the examiner), a suitable piano must be provided. A digital piano may be used, provided it has a clearly recognizable piano tone, a touch-sensitive keyboard with full-size weighted keys, and an action, compass and facilities that match those of a conventional acoustic piano, including a sustaining pedal.

From Grade 7 info:

Piano Grade 7 (2015 & 2016)

Piano requirements and information
Subject code: 01
The Piano requirements and information provide a summary of the most important points that teachers and candidates need to know when taking ABRSM Piano exams.

They are detailed within the exam sections below (Pieces, Scales and arpeggios, Sight-reading and Aural tests), immediately after the grade-specific requirements, and are available to download here.

Download full Piano requirements and information (PDF)
Further details, as well as administrative information relating to the exams, are given in ABRSM’s Information & Regulations which should be read before an exam booking is made.

Eligibility
There are eight grades for Piano and candidates may be entered in any grade irrespective of age and without previously having taken any other grade in Piano. Candidates for a Grade 6, 7 or 8 exam must already have passed ABRSM Grade 5 (or above) in Music Theory, Practical Musicianship or a solo Jazz subject; for full details, including a list of accepted alternatives, see Regulation 1d.

Instruments
ABRSM Centres provide a piano suitable for exam purposes. The piano will be upright or grand. Practice before the exam cannot be arranged, but examiners will recognize that the instrument may be one to which candidates are unaccustomed. When exams are held at Visits (i.e. premises provided by the Applicant and visited by the examiner), a suitable piano must be provided. A digital piano may be used, provided it has a clearly recognizable piano tone, a touch-sensitive keyboard with full-size weighted keys, and an action, compass and facilities that match those of a conventional acoustic piano, including a sustaining pedal.
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text