Celestron 15x70 Astronomy binoculars £40.99 Boxing Day Amazon Lightning Deal
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Celestron 15x70 Astronomy binoculars £40.99 Boxing Day Amazon Lightning Deal

24
Found 26th Dec 2015
As recommended by @VirtualAstro / #MeteorWatch / meteorwatch.org

Celestron 15x70 binoculars.

PAK-4 prisms and multi-coated optics. Pretty heavy, so will either need a tripod or elbows resting on one's own boobage for good stable image. If you can master keeping them stable, you'll get far more from these than you will a really cheap telescope.

Usually £65 from Amazon UK... this morning £40.99 delivered. Moronic price for bins with these specifications and good reviews.
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Thanks went for a set. £37 with my student discount. Now where's that tripod...
Original Poster
Wish I had an excuse to get it but we already have a Helios Stellar 15x70 from years back (that we paid £135 for and that was a great price at the time) so haven't got a good excuse. Heck of a decent deal, decent compliment, for anyone using traditional 10x50s for astro stuff.
Original Poster
jezzery

Thanks went for a set. £37 with my student discount. Now where's that … Thanks went for a set. £37 with my student discount. Now where's that tripod...



So glad it helped someone. As for tripods... grow a decent pair of boobs, pull your elbows inwards and sit them on top of the boobs... makes the perfect portable tripod. In seriousness, we've an old Benbo tripod plus an L mount that's perfect for the binoculars use as you can move them around willy-nilly and then just flip the locking handle to fix them in the current position!
Ive been in between getting these for months but worried I'll be disappointed with the results and hoping I would have seen more. I have a cheap skymaster telescope and have seen Jupiter and Saturns rings but not in great detail. It is difficult to find them on a telescope so was hoping these would be easier. Now I know I won't get colour or detail on a planet but can you make out the rings and moons? Also do you get fine detail of the moon or is the moon still quite 'small' in the field of view?

Been watching the skies for years but a total newbie with using instruments

Thanks
Original Poster
Bargeinion

Ive been in between getting these for months but worried I'll be … Ive been in between getting these for months but worried I'll be disappointed with the results and hoping I would have seen more. I have a cheap skymaster telescope and have seen Jupiter and Saturns rings but not in great detail. It is difficult to find them on a telescope so was hoping these would be easier. Now I know I won't get colour or detail on a planet but can you make out the rings and moons? Also do you get fine detail of the moon or is the moon still quite 'small' in the field of view?Been watching the skies for years but a total newbie with using instrumentsThanks



Hiya!

Cheap telescopes are always a disappointment, especially refractors (ones with lenses at either end.) That's how almost everyone starts off, sadly, and it often puts people off (it did me as a kid.)

There are budget reflector telescopes that people get a better experience out of, but they'll still cost a good £150+.

With telescopes, because the sky is moving all the time, and because of the high magnification (which makes them horridly sensitive to the sightest movement) you need both really good optics and a really good proper quality mount.

With these binoculars you will able to make out moons and possibly rings but certainly not details as it's only 15x magnification. Having said that, these wouldn't necessarily be the best starter bins due to size and weight - you'd almost certainly need to use a tripod with these.
This is a great deal, and 15x70 bins are good for looking at swathes of the skies and the moon. You will got no planetary detail at all with them though, they just don't have the magnification for that. You won't see Saturn's rings either - you might just see a slight ovalling of the planet shape if it's clear, still and you have great vision. You need a decent scope to view Saturn. Jupiter will also look like a very bright star, but you will see four jewel like dots in a row across the planet. These are the four Galilean moons. You will get a nice view of the Pleiades and Andromeda from a dark site.
how would these perform for looking at the iss and space in general?
I'm also curious about how these perform if a dodgy eye is present? my right eye is basically useless and carries about 15% vision, would this affect binocular use?
This deal's out of this world!
Edited by: "SteveM79" 26th Dec 2015
Would I be able to make out Mr Richardsons wife getting ready for work across the road with these?
Thanks for the replies, appreciated
I was seeing this girl for about six weeks, until someone stole my binoculars...

Ordered Thanks.




Been wanting to get a telescope for years but put off by the price for a decent entry model that I'm not 100% sure I'd still be using in a year.

So these are perfect to start me off, cheaper, good reviews and if i stick at it I can justify the telescope next year

Have some heat
scallygally

Would I be able to make out Mr Richardsons wife getting ready for work … Would I be able to make out Mr Richardsons wife getting ready for work across the road with these?


Should be able to see her orb bits.
http://www.reactiongifs.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/pigeon_popcorn.gif
doggboy10

how would these perform for looking at the iss and space in general?I'm … how would these perform for looking at the iss and space in general?I'm also curious about how these perform if a dodgy eye is present? my right eye is basically useless and carries about 15% vision, would this affect binocular use?



2 things, a spotting scope with 80 or 100mm are good way to go or bins with individual focus eyepieces (but will be a little more costly. Look up the Helios Quantum 4 (I am sure those will have the IF).

These are ok for the beginner on a budget to start, but the normal way to go is a 10x50mm then 20x80mm then the 25x100mm (BAK4, FMC - 'fully multi coated'). This is if you like bins.

or

Most people start with a bin and then once to know the sky, they splash out on a scope.

Hope this helps someone, but I would suggest get to a local astronomy group meeting (free to pop over and ask a question), they will be more than happy to show you a range of equipment they use and tell you what the jargon is with regards to the Bak's and coatings.






will i be able to see the alien bases on the moon with these?
Fantastic. Thanks. I would have missed this deal had I not seen this post. Been thinking about making a first jump into astronomy for a while now, debating what equipment to get. This price is too good to miss, so ordered. Looking forward to many dark nights in the coming weeks to get used to them. Cheers..
Excellent. Been after these for a while, just ordered. Thanks!!!
Price back up now
Still £40.99
I am on wait list ... does anyone know how waitlist work? Should I keep refreshing page?
I have these and they are amazing. Got really good reviews from astronomy sites. Amazing to look through these and see thousands of stars you never knew existed and amazing details of the moon (there's a great video on YouTube showing this and it's pretty accurate to what you get).

You definitely need a tripod, as they are heavy (I've also heard that lying on a lilo can help when viewing by resting your elbows on the sides when looking up); the Hama Tripod on Amazon for £17 is a good match for this.

I may buy another pair as a gift as around £30 cheaper than I paid
price back up now
recommendation for a slightly smaller set?
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