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Celestron 22050 LCM 60 Computerised Refractor Telescope - £129.90 delivered at Amazon
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Celestron 22050 LCM 60 Computerised Refractor Telescope - £129.90 delivered at Amazon

£129.90 Free P&P FreeAmazon Deals
Expert (Beta)13
Expert (Beta)
Posted 9th Jun

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

  • Good for terrestrial and celestial observing
  • High quality 60mm refractor with lightweight computerized mount and built-on StarPointer finderscope to help with alignment and accurately locating objects.
  • Quick-release computerised base, optical tube and accessory tray for quick no tool set up.
  • Sturdy aluminum tripod and accessory tray included. Good for terrestrial and celestial observing.
  • BONUS Astronomy Software download with a 10,000-object database, printable sky maps and 75 enhanced images.
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13 Comments
Is this a good beginner scope and can you take photos (or photos with the additional WiFi add-on)?
I've bought cheap manual telescopes in the past and trying to get focus, lens type and tracking correct basically ruined the experience, spending more time faffing than viewing, a problem when there's some cloud cover too.
Cheap for computer tracking but 60mm is too small an aperture.
The_Name_With_No_Man09/06/2020 12:56

Cheap for computer tracking but 60mm is too small an aperture.


What size aperture would you recommend? Looking for a telescope for a beginner.
wonder how a one of them bridge cameras with the superzooms on a tripod compares to something like this ?
I started astronomy decades ago using a 60mm without any tracking. With good focus and adapted eyes you can see the belts of jupiter, saturns rings, jupiters 4 main moons, our moon. Using a projection, you can track sun spots. NEVER LOOK THROUGH A SCOPE TO OR NEAR THE SUN.

Camera adapters do exist so you could do photos/video and use a stacking program to get the best image (registax IIRC). These images will surpass what you see with the naked eye.
LYallop09/06/2020 13:31

What size aperture would you recommend? Looking for a telescope for a …What size aperture would you recommend? Looking for a telescope for a beginner.


The general rule used to be 3 inches for a refractor, 6 inches for a reflector. Resolving power is directly related to aperture by the laws of physics. Patrick Moore always recommended that beginners start with binoculars. He hated the cheap small scopes that advertised unrealistic magnifications. Binoculars are easier to use and can give you views of Jupiter's moons, star clusters, the moon and so on, and are often cheaper than a disappointing telescope.
The_Name_With_No_Man09/06/2020 17:11

The general rule used to be 3 inches for a refractor, 6 inches for a …The general rule used to be 3 inches for a refractor, 6 inches for a reflector. Resolving power is directly related to aperture by the laws of physics. Patrick Moore always recommended that beginners start with binoculars. He hated the cheap small scopes that advertised unrealistic magnifications. Binoculars are easier to use and can give you views of Jupiter's moons, star clusters, the moon and so on, and are often cheaper than a disappointing telescope.



Could you recommend any binoculars? I was going to get a telescope but thinking binoculars might be a better starting point.
The_Name_With_No_Man09/06/2020 17:11

The general rule used to be 3 inches for a refractor, 6 inches for a …The general rule used to be 3 inches for a refractor, 6 inches for a reflector. Resolving power is directly related to aperture by the laws of physics. Patrick Moore always recommended that beginners start with binoculars. He hated the cheap small scopes that advertised unrealistic magnifications. Binoculars are easier to use and can give you views of Jupiter's moons, star clusters, the moon and so on, and are often cheaper than a disappointing telescope.


Why does a reflector need to be double the size of a refractor?
Fish'n'Chips09/06/2020 20:20

Could you recommend any binoculars? I was going to get a telescope but …Could you recommend any binoculars? I was going to get a telescope but thinking binoculars might be a better starting point.


7x50 (seven power, fifty mm aperture) or 10x50. The higher the power the dimmer the image and the harder to hold steady. 30mm objectives will gather less light but are lighter to hold. Do NOT get zoom.
T_Wang4s009/06/2020 22:22

Why does a reflector need to be double the size of a refractor?


That is just how I remember the recommendations from years ago. It doesn't need to be. In fact my reflector is 130mm, about 5 inches, and is fine. When I was a kid I had a four inch reflector. Bigger is better for light gathering and resolving power, assuming equivalent quality of optics. More light and resolving power allows higher practical magnification.
Edited by: "The_Name_With_No_Man" 9th Jun
Fish'n'Chips09/06/2020 20:20

Could you recommend any binoculars? I was going to get a telescope but …Could you recommend any binoculars? I was going to get a telescope but thinking binoculars might be a better starting point.


Binos are a good starting point, stick with 7x50, see if you can find a brand that has an attachment to put these on a photo tripod, that way you wont have to hold them upto your eyes whilst your arms shake after holding them for a while. It will steady the image no end.

Binos, or scope... Personal preference. If you want to just scan stars and look at clusters etc then defo go for the Binos. If you want to see any planet detail like saturns rings etc, Scope with a couple of decent eyepieces. AVOID any scope that advertises magnification.

Those who say 3" minimum for a refractor, well yeah, ideally. But optics have improved, the coatings are better. I'd say if you have a relatively dark location, 60mm will be fine. If you live in a bright LED lit city where at night you cant see anything, then not even a 3" will help that without knowing where to point it.

Regarding this scope, it will point for you to the target you select, ive not seen a pair of binos do that... yet.
Up to £139 now.
The_Name_With_No_Man09/06/2020 23:17

7x50 (seven power, fifty mm aperture) or 10x50. The higher the power the …7x50 (seven power, fifty mm aperture) or 10x50. The higher the power the dimmer the image and the harder to hold steady. 30mm objectives will gather less light but are lighter to hold. Do NOT get zoom.


What about celestron 15x70 with a stable Tripod? Heard it’s good and with a tripod, really stable
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