Celestron PowerSeeker 114EQ.  Also available on Maplin eBay store - £49.99 @ Maplin
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Celestron PowerSeeker 114EQ. Also available on Maplin eBay store - £49.99 @ Maplin

43
Found 2nd Dec
Product overview

Explore the universe and the world around you with this Newtonian reflector telescope
Capable of up to 269 times magnification (using Barlow Lens) to see to Jupiter and beyond
Comes with two eyepieces (20mm and 4mm) and a 3 times Barlow lens to customise your telescope for the best view
Get a clear, bright image with a 114mm aperture
Lower the magnification down to 16 times (45 times with supplied eyepieces)
Comes with an Equatorial CG-3 mount and its own tripod for stability

What can I see with this telescope?
Have a look at the face of Jupiter or explore the world around you with this powerful Newtonian reflector telescope. View the night sky with magnifications up to 269 times. The telescope has fully coated lens, an aperture of 114mm and light gathering ability of 265 times that of the human eye to give you a clear, bright image. This telescope comes with two eyepieces, one with 45 times magnification and one with 225 times magnification. There is also a three times Barlow lens which can be used with any of the eyepieces to increase their magnification.

Why choose a reflector telescope?
Reflector telescopes are open at one end and use mirrors to collect and focus light for the image. Typically, the apertures of reflector telescopes are larger than their refractors. This means they can see further and fainter objects and have a wider apparent field of view. The bodies of the reflector telescope can be made smaller, all while maintaining the same level of magnification. Reflector telescopes don’t suffer from chromatic aberration, colours appearing around an image, like some refractors. Reflector telescopes display the image upside down. This is normal for astronomical telescopes, but will be noticeable with terrestrial viewing.

How easy is it to assemble?
Easy to use, you can assemble this telescope without tools. It even comes with a stable tripod and counterweight system. There is a tray under the telescope to store your alternative eyepiece and other essentials. Smooth controls mean that it’s easier to track object across the night sky. The finderscope can help you position your telescope to the right orientation. The Barlow lens can be attached between the focuser and the eyepiece, tripling the magnification of each eyepiece.

How easy is it to align my telescope?
The PowerSeeker comes on an Equatorial mount which can be adjusted to a wide range of positions. By aligning the latitude scale and the setting circles using known points in the sky you can use these to pin point other objects in the night sky. Discover the universe or explore closer to home with this great telescope.

Top comments

rincewynd629 m ago

I really need to stop watching this site lol.Last night I bought a drone …I really need to stop watching this site lol.Last night I bought a drone and today a telescope.


Well at least you'll see where it crashed ; )
Edited by: "Biggunspaul" 2nd Dec

I really need to stop watching this site lol.
Last night I bought a drone and today a telescope.

Some things you will see with this:
The Moon will be amazing, craters, seas, rilles ect will all be viewable.
Jupiter will show the 4 main moons and some bands but possibly not the great red spot, you may see shadows of its moons when the cross the planet.
Saturn will show it rings but maybe not the Cassini division. Titan will also be seen.
Mars will be viewable but no detail
Venus will show it's phases but no detail (nor in any big scopes either)
Mercury will show phases (I've never seen it)
Uranus and Neptune will show their green and blue colours well and will be distinguished as a disc.
Ceres, Pallas and Juno will be found (only ever found Ceres)
Bright comets are best viewed with low magnification.
Andromeda easily viewable along with it's satellite galaxies
M42, the Orion Nebula will be great, you should make out the 4 trapezium stars.
Faint fuzzies are dependent on conditions, globular clusters will be visible.

DO NOT, REPEAT DO NOT try and view the Sun nor even project it's image with this scope. You may blind yourself or ruin an eyepiece (don't I know about this and I should know better doh!)

Other things:
You can buy a phone adapter to attach to the eyepiece.
Download Stellarium, this is free software to see what's viewable. You can add satellites, comets, asteroids to the program. It really is essential.
If your in a city (I am) you can find areas where viewing is better. Check out lightpollutionmap.info
Finally if your after extra eyepieces, I can recommend Orbinar, these are cheap but relatively decent eyepieces, I own a few.
Edited by: "GlentoranMark" 2nd Dec
43 Comments

Original Poster

Edited by: "DontNeedItButGiveMe10" 2nd Dec

Looking for a telescope, can anyone comment on the performance of this one?

dcairns316 m ago

Looking for a telescope, can anyone comment on the performance of this one?


Am looking at maybe getting one but have read that its no good going in too low a spec. But have no idea of specs

dcairns316 m ago

Looking for a telescope, can anyone comment on the performance of this one?



As a beginner telescope for 50£ you'll be happy. You'll get a pretty detailed view of the moon and with some experience you'll be able to find additional planets.

I've just reserved one after reading some reviews, it seems to be regarded as a good beginners telescope at full price with the proviso that apparently it can be difficult to set up, a common recommendation seems to be ignore the instructions and find a tutorial on YouTube. I like that it can be upgraded with a motorised base etc. as if my son gets into it (or more likely I do) then I won't need to think about changing it for a while.

As kintsune said it's fine for £50 and a decent buy for a beginner at that price. It will do enough to see if the intended recipient is actually interested and you would get most of the initial cost back 2nd hand if you eventually upgrade or lose interest. In my experience it doesn't really matter how good the telescope is for a first timer as long as it's not an absolute dog like many of the beginner packages (this isn't). It's the commitment to spending hours outside, often in the cold, that most people don't get past

I really need to stop watching this site lol.
Last night I bought a drone and today a telescope.

rincewynd629 m ago

I really need to stop watching this site lol.Last night I bought a drone …I really need to stop watching this site lol.Last night I bought a drone and today a telescope.


Well at least you'll see where it crashed ; )
Edited by: "Biggunspaul" 2nd Dec

Is this any good for the bedroom? Son is 8 years old. Don't plan on him going outside in it (Maybe in summer). Will be his first telescope for the bedroom.

First telescope ever i mean

If it hasn't got the mechanised tracking and software it's not worth getting if you ask me, I know you need to spend well over 200 but I think this cheap one would end up in the cupboard never used. Also if you live in a town you should ask yourself how likely you are to take a telescope out to the countryside at night time and probably freeze your nuts off.
Maybe this would be good for daytime use? When I was a kid I loved looking at boats out at sea.

“Its like a finger pointing away to the moon. Dont concentrate on the finger or you will miss all that heavenly glory.”

jumpinoffthbed32 m ago

If it hasn't got the mechanised tracking and software it's not worth …If it hasn't got the mechanised tracking and software it's not worth getting if you ask me, I know you need to spend well over 200 but I think this cheap one would end up in the cupboard never used. Also if you live in a town you should ask yourself how likely you are to take a telescope out to the countryside at night time and probably freeze your nuts off. Maybe this would be good for daytime use? When I was a kid I loved looking at boats out at sea.


Not quite sure what mechanised tracking and software is for? What do i need to look for when buying one of these telescopes? in my head. I just think, set this up in his bedroom and leave it there and wait till he sees something. IE moon, (maybe different planets. LOL)

Is that even possible?

and in how much detail will i be able to see Uranus with this?

jumpinoffthbed1 h, 1 m ago

If it hasn't got the mechanised tracking and software it's not worth …If it hasn't got the mechanised tracking and software it's not worth getting if you ask me,


That's simply not true, sorry. Part of the appeal is learning about the night sky and learning where planets and constellations are and then discovering something for the first time. They aren't that accurate anyway if you don't set it up precisely which is hard with the mounts on most cheaper telescopes. At telescopic magnifications the tiniest error will put you miles out. I'd say the scope for frustration would increase tenfold with a poor automated system. Eyes are far more reliable.

Certainly a cheap one would end up in the cupboard unused, but this is a decent beginner scope and you would see the moon well with it, the rings of Saturn and Jupiter's moons. Though don't expect anything like the pictures from the Hubble. Most people don't realise just how small planets still appear, even with a really decent telescope.

Certainly true about the cold. That's the interest killer for most people.

Hopeless for daytime use. Astronomical telescopes show the image upside down (obviously doesn't matter for planets etc, might for boats......) Also far too powerful a magnification.

slamukdeals30 m ago

Not quite sure what mechanised tracking and software is for? What do i …Not quite sure what mechanised tracking and software is for? What do i need to look for when buying one of these telescopes? in my head. I just think, set this up in his bedroom and leave it there and wait till he sees something. IE moon, (maybe different planets. LOL)Is that even possible?



It's ok from a bedroom window as long as its open. Obviously a very restricted view so you'll miss 95% of the sky. Also light pollution likely to be a real problem. Taking it from a warm house outside an using it straight away won't work either. Apart from everything fogging up for ages the difference in temperature will cause interference, like heat wave in the summer.

slamukdeals36 m ago

Not quite sure what mechanised tracking and software is for? What do i …Not quite sure what mechanised tracking and software is for? What do i need to look for when buying one of these telescopes? in my head. I just think, set this up in his bedroom and leave it there and wait till he sees something. IE moon, (maybe different planets. LOL)Is that even possible?



Basically you show it where 2 specific things in its database are and then it finds anything else you want to look at for you, like if you want to look at Jupiter you just tell it which I imagine would take me forever otherwise. More than that it follows things (a star or planet will move out of view in no time and you'll be constantly trying to move the telescope) so just makes the whole experience easier and fun. Like I said tho you'll be spending a lot more money, but you'll also get a better telescope
If he just wants to look at the moon maybe this is fine. Patrick Moore used to say a powerful pair of binoculars are better than a cheap telescope for star gazing, I suspect this is because mechanised tracking was extremely expensive back then.

merlinthehappypig6 m ago

It's ok from a bedroom window as long as its open. Obviously a very …It's ok from a bedroom window as long as its open. Obviously a very restricted view so you'll miss 95% of the sky. Also light pollution likely to be a real problem. Taking it from a warm house outside an using it straight away won't work either. Apart from everything fogging up for ages the difference in temperature will cause interference, like heat wave in the summer.


You appear to know your things about telescopes. So for a 8 year old boy, this will be a good first step into learning about the sky and whats out there? Considering we are on a deals website, this would be classed as a exceptional deal or just a ok deal?

For the price is there anything better?

Isn't £49.99 a bit expensive for a coat hanger?

merlinthehappypig18 m ago

That's simply not true, sorry. Part of the appeal is learning about the …That's simply not true, sorry. Part of the appeal is learning about the night sky and learning where planets and constellations are and then discovering something for the first time. They aren't that accurate anyway if you don't set it up precisely which is hard with the mounts on most cheaper telescopes. At telescopic magnifications the tiniest error will put you miles out. I'd say the scope for frustration would increase tenfold with a poor automated system. Eyes are far more reliable.Certainly a cheap one would end up in the cupboard unused, but this is a decent beginner scope and you would see the moon well with it, the rings of Saturn and Jupiter's moons. Though don't expect anything like the pictures from the Hubble. Most people don't realise just how small planets still appear, even with a really decent telescope.Certainly true about the cold. That's the interest killer for most people.Hopeless for daytime use. Astronomical telescopes show the image upside down (obviously doesn't matter for planets etc, might for boats......) Also far too powerful a magnification.


I read a lot of reviews on Amazon and people seem to get on with them just fine, but I was looking at nearly £400 ones so maybe they fair better. I remember some mention adapters that give you the true image but if you say it's too powerful for land use ill take your word for it.

slamukdeals15 m ago

You appear to know your things about telescopes. So for a 8 year old boy, …You appear to know your things about telescopes. So for a 8 year old boy, this will be a good first step into learning about the sky and whats out there? Considering we are on a deals website, this would be classed as a exceptional deal or just a ok deal? For the price is there anything better?



My 2 cents as an Astro nut.

My above remark was tongue in cheek but it's true. This will end up as an expensive coathanger.

In saying that I think any child would prefer a telescope over binoculars although a decent pair of bins would be of far better use.

Celestron are a known brand in astronomy and while the optics are made in China, they are usually of decent quality. This is not the most powerful or best choice for a beginner but for the price I think it's decent value.

Please make sure your child uses this under supervision. One quick glance at the Sun through this will blind a child.

I'm pretty dedicated to Astronomy, I listen to a lot of Podcasts and read as much as I can on the subject. I also own a small Telescope, a bit more powerful than this but as MerlinTheHappyPig says it takes a lot of dedication to go out in the freezing cold or up at unsociable hours which I don't have. This will end up an expensive coathanger.
Edited by: "GlentoranMark" 2nd Dec

Some things you will see with this:
The Moon will be amazing, craters, seas, rilles ect will all be viewable.
Jupiter will show the 4 main moons and some bands but possibly not the great red spot, you may see shadows of its moons when the cross the planet.
Saturn will show it rings but maybe not the Cassini division. Titan will also be seen.
Mars will be viewable but no detail
Venus will show it's phases but no detail (nor in any big scopes either)
Mercury will show phases (I've never seen it)
Uranus and Neptune will show their green and blue colours well and will be distinguished as a disc.
Ceres, Pallas and Juno will be found (only ever found Ceres)
Bright comets are best viewed with low magnification.
Andromeda easily viewable along with it's satellite galaxies
M42, the Orion Nebula will be great, you should make out the 4 trapezium stars.
Faint fuzzies are dependent on conditions, globular clusters will be visible.

DO NOT, REPEAT DO NOT try and view the Sun nor even project it's image with this scope. You may blind yourself or ruin an eyepiece (don't I know about this and I should know better doh!)

Other things:
You can buy a phone adapter to attach to the eyepiece.
Download Stellarium, this is free software to see what's viewable. You can add satellites, comets, asteroids to the program. It really is essential.
If your in a city (I am) you can find areas where viewing is better. Check out lightpollutionmap.info
Finally if your after extra eyepieces, I can recommend Orbinar, these are cheap but relatively decent eyepieces, I own a few.
Edited by: "GlentoranMark" 2nd Dec

GlentoranMark29 m ago

Some things you will see with this:The Moon will be amazing, craters, …Some things you will see with this:The Moon will be amazing, craters, seas, rilles ect will all be viewable.Jupiter will show the 4 main moons and some bands but possibly not the great red spot, you may see shadows of its moons when the cross the planet.Saturn will show it rings but maybe not the Cassini division. Titan will also be seen.Mars will be viewable but no detailVenus will show it's phases but no detail (nor in any big scopes either)Mercury will show phases (I've never seen it)Uranus and Neptune will show their green and blue colours well and will be distinguished as a disc.Ceres, Pallas and Juno will be found (only ever found Ceres)Bright comets are best viewed with low magnification.Andromeda easily viewable along with it's satellite galaxiesM42, the Orion Nebula will be great, you should make out the 4 trapezium stars.Faint fuzzies are dependent on conditions, globular clusters will be visible.DO NOT, REPEAT DO NOT try and view the Sun nor even project it's image with this scope. You may blind yourself or ruin an eyepiece (don't I know about this and I should know better doh!)Other things: You can buy a phone adapter to attach to the eyepiece.Download Stellarium, this is free software to see what's viewable. You can add satellites, comets, asteroids to the program. It really is essential.If your in a city (I am) you can find areas where viewing is better. Check out https://www.lightpollutionmap.infoFinally if your after extra eyepieces, I can recommend Orbinar, these are cheap but relatively decent eyepieces, I own a few.


Thanks for this.

Decided to get this. As, if he does like it, then it will be an expensive hobby and a learning one at that. lol
I have £10 off voucher so it makes it £40 so not too bad of a price right?

Kind of worried if he will look at the sun though, but I will just tell him to only use at night.

slamukdeals10 m ago

Thanks for this. Decided to get this. As, if he does like it, then it will …Thanks for this. Decided to get this. As, if he does like it, then it will be an expensive hobby and a learning one at that. lolI have £10 off voucher so it makes it £40 so not too bad of a price right?Kind of worried if he will look at the sun though, but I will just tell him to only use at night.



I can't stress this enough. Don't even project the Sun through this. I'm 49 and have been an active astronomer since 14.

I bought a cheap telescope as a kid and then bought my current scope around 10 years ago. I knew the dangers of the Sun but one of the first things I done with my current scope was project the Sun through a 9mm eyepiece. Within a matter of seconds the eyepiece had melted. With my knowledge I should have known better but I still made that mistake. Think if your child is looking through the scope and sweeping around for the Sun, he/ she would have no chance and would be blinded in an instant.

I have always recommended a decent pair of binoculars for a first scope but as a 14 year old I knew I'd rather have a big long thing on a tripod even though in hindsight a decent pair of bins would have done me much better. My current scope has coats over it atm but a child would appreciate it and if it gives him or her an interest like it did for me then it's a hobby for life (albeit an expensive one!)

GlentoranMark6 m ago

I can't stress this enough. Don't even project the Sun through this. I'm …I can't stress this enough. Don't even project the Sun through this. I'm 49 and have been an active astronomer since 14.I bought a cheap telescope as a kid and then bought my current scope around 10 years ago. I knew the dangers of the Sun but one of the first things I done with my current scope was project the Sun through a 9mm eyepiece. Within a matter of seconds the eyepiece had melted. With my knowledge I should have known better but I still made that mistake. Think if your child is looking through the scope and sweeping around for the Sun, he/ she would have no chance and would be blinded in an instant.I have always recommended a decent pair of binoculars for a first scope but as a 14 year old I knew I'd rather have a big long thing on a tripod even though in hindsight a decent pair of bins would have done me much better. My current scope has coats over it atm but a child would appreciate it and if it gives him or her an interest like it did for me then it's a hobby for life (albeit an expensive one!)


Note taken. Will only let him use when supervised and in the night. So he can see the moon the stars etc. (Im guessing stars are ok?)

Im hoping he just learns about it and wants to learn about it. His into ipad and ps4 etc, but want him to be more active as in doing other activities than watching a screen all day.

slamukdeals14 m ago

Note taken. Will only let him use when supervised and in the night. So he …Note taken. Will only let him use when supervised and in the night. So he can see the moon the stars etc. (Im guessing stars are ok?) Im hoping he just learns about it and wants to learn about it. His into ipad and ps4 etc, but want him to be more active as in doing other activities than watching a screen all day.


Yes anything at night is fine. He'll also be fine during the day but just warn him of the dangers. I'm sure you've seen video's of a magnifying glass starting a fire. A telescope is a bigger magnifying glass. As noted above, things will be upside down in this, it may come with an erecting prism that he'll be able to use during the day. If it does, bring it with you the next time you go to the beach.

Download Stellarium now and see what's in the night sky. Nothing beats the naked eye for viewing. I looked at an almost full Moon last night, just a glance but I always look up any time I see a clear sky. The Moon is not great for astronomers as it's so bright it drowns out the faint fuzzies but it's also a great spectacle for a small telescope.

8 is a great age, he'll love it I'm sure.
Edited by: "GlentoranMark" 2nd Dec

GlentoranMark1 h, 41 m ago

Isn't £49.99 a bit expensive for a coat hanger?


Not really ive seen a lot of £200 treadmills on here.

This is an actual pic I took from a webcam attached to my telescope, it's also similar to the view you will get through high magnification in decent conditions under a light polluted sky with this scope. You can see some banding and a couple of the moons.

32629169-ZdZI5.jpg

I've lost the original source of this image, it was taken possibly 10 years ago and been uploaded and downloaded a few times so the picture has lost a lot of its quality.

GlentoranMark2 h, 40 m ago

Isn't £49.99 a bit expensive for a coat hanger?



It's a lot better than paying £300 for an expensive coat hanger At least at £50 it won't be too bad if it only gets used a few times and whilst it's not great, it will show enough to tell whether someone gets the bug or not. At that point they can think about investing more. I'm of an age and also grew up with the 'get binoculars instead'. It didn't work with any of my kids. It might be better, but it's not as cool.......

merlinthehappypig25 m ago

It's a lot better than paying £300 for an expensive coat hanger At …It's a lot better than paying £300 for an expensive coat hanger At least at £50 it won't be too bad if it only gets used a few times and whilst it's not great, it will show enough to tell whether someone gets the bug or not. At that point they can think about investing more. I'm of an age and also grew up with the 'get binoculars instead'. It didn't work with any of my kids. It might be better, but it's not as cool.......



I used to put people off deals like this as I've been there and done that but to an 8 year old a telescope looks much better than a silly pair of binoculars. A decent pair of bins will be far more useful but a telescope has more cred (You hit it right with cool)

This would be bottom of the range of my serious scopes. It's not a toy telescope but it's also not great as a serious scope. The polar alignment will be a pain but it would be fine just using it as an altazimuth mount (same thing as a regular tripod). Still it would be able to see the things I mentions above.

I'd recommend this, it's a decent price for the spec and if it gives a child an interest in astronomy or the world around them then it's money well spent... even if it does end up a coathanger

I want a bigger scope!!!

Equatorial Mount, although it’s a basic one will teach important information about finding and tracking things. Learn how to set it up and align it properly, then gently adjust it to keep objects in view. Having an auto guided scope does still need some knowledge to set up but you won’t learn so much.

View of Saturn will still be a small object but the rings will show. Jupiter moons will show as shiny dots.

Moon will look great through this.

If you you live in a low light pollution area you should be able to see nebulae. In a town, forget it.

The usefulness of any scope will come down to your own interest and enthusiasm. Even an expensive guided Meade would be a coat hanger unless you really are interested in observing.
This would be a great entry, for £50, see if you like and enjoy it, then step up
Edited by: "androoski" 2nd Dec


If you you live in a low light pollution area you should be able to see nebulae. In a town, forget it.


I'm suburban Belfast here, close to the center. Andromeda, M42 and M13 are all visiblein binoculars never mind a scope. I can see max of mag 2 stars with my naked eye. That photo above was taken after opposition and isn't the original so I'm quite pleased I got any detail.

Light pollution sucks but it's still possible to view things under less than perfect conditions.

GlentoranMark1 h, 42 m ago

I want a bigger scope!!!


I worked my way up to a 6" refractor, which is a bit of a monster, then hardly ever used it as it was such a pain to get out and set up. Needed several hours to equalise the temperature properly if stored inside. It's somewhat ironic that I suspect I'd get out and do more if I had the £50 one here. Must be a lesson in that somewhere.

GlentoranMark5 h, 11 m ago

Some things you will see with this:The Moon will be amazing, craters, …Some things you will see with this:The Moon will be amazing, craters, seas, rilles ect will all be viewable.Jupiter will show the 4 main moons and some bands but possibly not the great red spot, you may see shadows of its moons when the cross the planet.Saturn will show it rings but maybe not the Cassini division. Titan will also be seen.Mars will be viewable but no detailVenus will show it's phases but no detail (nor in any big scopes either)Mercury will show phases (I've never seen it)Uranus and Neptune will show their green and blue colours well and will be distinguished as a disc.Ceres, Pallas and Juno will be found (only ever found Ceres)Bright comets are best viewed with low magnification.Andromeda easily viewable along with it's satellite galaxiesM42, the Orion Nebula will be great, you should make out the 4 trapezium stars.Faint fuzzies are dependent on conditions, globular clusters will be visible.DO NOT, REPEAT DO NOT try and view the Sun nor even project it's image with this scope. You may blind yourself or ruin an eyepiece (don't I know about this and I should know better doh!)Other things: You can buy a phone adapter to attach to the eyepiece.Download Stellarium, this is free software to see what's viewable. You can add satellites, comets, asteroids to the program. It really is essential.If your in a city (I am) you can find areas where viewing is better. Check out https://www.lightpollutionmap.infoFinally if your after extra eyepieces, I can recommend Orbinar, these are cheap but relatively decent eyepieces, I own a few.


very details.
Many thanks.
Ordered.

This is pretty well regarded for anyone who knows it's a hobby they want to get into

I have literally just bought this model, but from the AstroMaster range for £126. It is to be a present for my 6 year old son. Can I please ask some advice.....would I be better cancelling and buying this cheaper one or is does the astromaster warrant the extra money. Thanks.

This thing is massive, wasn't expecting this to be this big. Will open and setup it tomorrow. Thanks all for your help, downloaded Stellarium and will learn how to use.

Thanks for this - I've been wanting to get something to try for a while, but daughter has been doing planets at school and is really gripped with them. So this will make a perfect Xmas present and we've a small roof to go out on at night and can get a good view of most of the sky (South/West/North).

Seems to be some knowledgeable folks in this thread.

Would the above be much better than my Celestron Powerseeker 60AZ?

Have used it a few times to look at the moon and at the night sky in general.
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