Cheaper Kia Sportage 1.6 1 Gdi Lease 10k miles £4181.71 @ Leasing Options
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Cheaper Kia Sportage 1.6 1 Gdi Lease 10k miles £4181.71 @ Leasing Options

42
Found 13th Jun 2016
Cheaper deal but 6 months down plus 23 repayments of £137.99 +180 admin charge. If you have the £827.94 this saves quite a bit over the other deal
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slightly cheaper on 3+23 10k if my quick maths is correct
SpoonyBoy

slightly cheaper on 3+23 10k if my quick maths is correct



​my bad, didn't add the pennies. works out the same with less up front. good find op
Kia Sportage. Looks nice on the outside but disappointingly cheap and plasticy on the inside.
qwerta369

Kia Sportage. Looks nice on the outside but disappointingly cheap and … Kia Sportage. Looks nice on the outside but disappointingly cheap and plasticy on the inside.



​ yes but better than an Austin princess ??
qwerta369

Kia Sportage. Looks nice on the outside but disappointingly cheap and … Kia Sportage. Looks nice on the outside but disappointingly cheap and plasticy on the inside.



​what were you expecting for the money? A porsche
Heat Sink

​what were you expecting for the money? A porsche



​well, yes

autotrader.co.uk/use…554
Groovii D

​well, y … ​well, yeshttp://www.autotrader.co.uk/used-cars/porsche/cayenne/used-porsche-cayenne-4-5-s-tiptronic-s-5dr-chesham-fpa-201606134890554




That crate will probably do no more than 2 to the gallon.
Heat Sink

​what were you expecting for the money? A porsche



My wife wants a porch.

zx636r

That crate will probably do no more than 2 to the gallon.



​probably not as is blows by your B1
Sportage used to be attractive, now it's fugly. What were they thinking...
Avatar
deleted1336857
*****Please see Markymarks's post #34 for best practice when leasing a vehicle in the UK*****

Great recent advice from USA on leasing:
"Dealers love leasing because they can make really appealing monthly payment numbers and the formulas to compute those payments are complex enough most salesmen won't really know how they work, let alone the customers, so it makes hiding extra charges much harder to notice.

That said, if you do your homework, just as you are doing, leasing can be a really good way of owning a car if you know what you are doing and follow a few guidelines.

First, never put money down on a lease. You want zero down or you don't want it. Any lease can be written with zero down, but they often use large downpayments as a way to advertise a low monthly payment. You don't want to put money down on a lease because if the worst happens and you have an accident with the vehicle early in your ownership, any downpayment is gone. Keep the money in your pocket and pay a higher monthly payment.

PLEASE NOTE 'GAP' MUST BE TAKEN OUT WITH ZERO DEPOSIT AS THERE WOULD BE A SHORTFALL IF THE CAR IS WRITTEN OFF OR STOLEN.

Second, learn how to calculate the lease payment yourself. There are plenty of guides online, and even apps you can get on your phone like iLeaseCarPro, so you can quickly verify the numbers that any dealer is giving you. If your dealer is not willing to give you every number that goes into calculating your lease payment, find another dealer. Numbers like the money factor and residual are not secret, but many dealers like to make them secret so they can pad them and prevent customers from really knowing what's going on. The residual is set by the manufacturer and can't be altered by the dealer. The money factor is essentially the interest rate set by the lending arm of the manufacturer, and it may be difficult to find the exact number currently being offered, Edmunds forums sometimes have that info for a particular car - so it can be a place for a dealer to hide profit. You should be able to get close to what the real number is though and find a dealer that is somewhere in the ballpark. The buying price is also important in a lease. Negotiate the selling price exactly as if you were purchasing the car. Walk away from any dealer that tells you this isn't possible. You want the biggest spread possible between MSRP and selling price.

A lease can be purchased by the lessee at any time for whatever the current payoff is calculated at. If you keep it until lease end you have a few choices. You can turn it in and just be done with it, you can buy the car outright for the buyout, which is negotiable. You'll often get a good deal here because the dealer would rather sell to you than have to take the car back prepare it for sale and resell it to someone else. If the residual was calculated poorly by the manufacturer, you have a few options. This could mean that the car is worth a lot less than expected (in which case you should turn it in and let them take the loss, or use this knowledge to your advantage to buy out the vehicle at a lower price if you want to keep it) or it could be worth much more than expected, in which case, if the gap is large enough, you could buy the vehicle for the agreed-upon buyout price and resell it for a profit on your own (or use this as leverage with the dealer for getting a better deal on a new car). This is the advantage of leasing that most pundits miss; the bank takes all of the risk of depreciation off your hands, while leaving you with a lot of options for using that to your advantage.

The downsides are really only if you expect to turn the car in and know that you are really hard on cars. I only suggest leasing for people I know who take pretty good care of their cars because you can get hammered pretty hard for damage or excess wear. So be honest about how you care for your cars in making this decision."







Edited by: "deleted1336857" 14th Jun 2016
Dont think people are allowed to say duplicate thread, same product, same site just different payment structure.......so I wont as i would get in to trouble for trolling


COLD
zx636r

That crate will probably do no more than 2 to the gallon.



Who would buy a Porsche for the fuel economy anyways?
deany76

Great recent advice from USA on leasing:"Dealers love leasing because … Great recent advice from USA on leasing:"Dealers love leasing because they can make really appealing monthly payment numbers and the formulas to compute those payments are complex enough most salesmen won't really know how they work, let alone the customers, so it makes hiding extra charges much harder to notice.That said, if you do your homework, just as you are doing, leasing can be a really good way of owning a car if you know what you are doing and follow a few guidelines.First, never put money down on a lease. You want zero down or you don't want it. Any lease can be written with zero down, but they often use large downpayments as a way to advertise a low monthly payment. You don't want to put money down on a lease because if the worst happens and you have an accident with the vehicle early in your ownership, any downpayment is gone. Keep the money in your pocket and pay a higher monthly payment.Second, learn how to calculate the lease payment yourself. There are plenty of guides online, and even apps you can get on your phone like iLeaseCarPro, so you can quickly verify the numbers that any dealer is giving you. If your dealer is not willing to give you every number that goes into calculating your lease payment, find another dealer. Numbers like the money factor and residual are not secret, but many dealers like to make them secret so they can pad them and prevent customers from really knowing what's going on. The residual is set by the manufacturer and can't be altered by the dealer. The money factor is essentially the interest rate set by the lending arm of the manufacturer, and it may be difficult to find the exact number currently being offered, Edmunds forums sometimes have that info for a particular car - so it can be a place for a dealer to hide profit. You should be able to get close to what the real number is though and find a dealer that is somewhere in the ballpark. The buying price is also important in a lease. Negotiate the selling price exactly as if you were purchasing the car. Walk away from any dealer that tells you this isn't possible. You want the biggest spread possible between MSRP and selling price.A lease can be purchased by the lessee at any time for whatever the current payoff is calculated at. If you keep it until lease end you have a few choices. You can turn it in and just be done with it, you can buy the car outright for the buyout, which is negotiable. You'll often get a good deal here because the dealer would rather sell to you than have to take the car back prepare it for sale and resell it to someone else. If the residual was calculated poorly by the manufacturer, you have a few options. This could mean that the car is worth a lot less than expected (in which case you should turn it in and let them take the loss, or use this knowledge to your advantage to buy out the vehicle at a lower price if you want to keep it) or it could be worth much more than expected, in which case, if the gap is large enough, you could buy the vehicle for the agreed-upon buyout price and resell it for a profit on your own (or use this as leverage with the dealer for getting a better deal on a new car). This is the advantage of leasing that most pundits miss; the bank takes all of the risk of depreciation off your hands, while leaving you with a lot of options for using that to your advantage.The downsides are really only if you expect to turn the car in and know that you are really hard on cars. I only suggest leasing for people I know who take pretty good care of their cars because you can get hammered pretty hard for damage or excess wear. So be honest about how you care for your cars in making this decision."



Some poor inaccurate points in that I'm afraid. To pick just one about putting zero deposit down or nothing as if you have an accident early on your money is gone... It doesn't matter if you put zero payments upfront or upto 9 should the worst happen and the vehicle gets written off you will be liable to cover the cost to replace the full cost of the vehicle plus any remaining payments on the lease so this is why it makes sense to get GAP cover for that eventuality.
Avatar
deleted1336857
Zero deposit leases ARE available in the UK hippoleasing.co.uk/ex-…ars
(cant recommend company)
How I mean by liable to cover the cost is say the vehicle was 20k to replace and you had another 10 payments of £100pm you would effectively need to stump up 21k now your insurance company pay out the "market value" for said car of say 16k you need to pay off the missing 5k!
qwerta369

Kia Sportage. Looks nice on the outside but disappointingly cheap and … Kia Sportage. Looks nice on the outside but disappointingly cheap and plasticy on the inside.



Like most Kias
Avatar
deleted1336857
cossiecraig

Some poor inaccurate points in that I'm afraid. To pick just one about … Some poor inaccurate points in that I'm afraid. To pick just one about putting zero deposit down or nothing as if you have an accident early on your money is gone... It doesn't matter if you put zero payments upfront or upto 9 should the worst happen and the vehicle gets written off you will be liable to cover the cost to replace the full cost of the vehicle plus any remaining payments on the lease so this is why it makes sense to get GAP cover for that eventuality.


I did say it was info from the States & they have a fair few cars on the road.
What happens if its not a write off but major damage & car cant be driven while its all sorted out?
Also surely folks who are new to leasing should be made aware of GAP.

Edited by: "deleted1336857" 14th Jun 2016
SpoonyBoy

​my bad, didn't add the pennies. works out the same with less up front. … ​my bad, didn't add the pennies. works out the same with less up front. good find op



Every little helps, this is Hot UK Deals!!
Metallic Paint is £545.00, cheaper deals out there with paint included.
Avatar
deleted1336857
cossiecraig

How I mean by liable to cover the cost is say the vehicle was 20k to … How I mean by liable to cover the cost is say the vehicle was 20k to replace and you had another 10 payments of £100pm you would effectively need to stump up 21k now your insurance company pay out the "market value" for said car of say 16k you need to pay off the missing 5k!



Yes folks need to know the importance of GAP insurance for UK lease deals.
https://www.abi.org.uk/Insurance-and-savings/Products/~/~/media/16515033DA6341D0A4FB00ED908528B7.ashx
Edited by: "deleted1336857" 14th Jun 2016
so is this 2 years and 2 months
deany76

Yes folks need to know the importance of GAP insurance for UK lease … Yes folks need to know the importance of GAP insurance for UK lease deals.https://www.abi.org.uk/Insurance-and-savings/Products/~/~/media/16515033DA6341D0A4FB00ED908528B7.ashx


Interesting to read all these posts. I'm considering leasing for the first time and wouldn't have known about gap insurance or some of the other factors to consider so useful thanks. More research for me I reckon...
deany76

I did say it was info from the States & they have a fair few cars on the … I did say it was info from the States & they have a fair few cars on the road.What happens if its not a write off but major damage & car cant be driven while its all sorted out?Also surely folks who are new to leasing should be made aware of GAP.



Interesting....my current lease company was very clear that I did not need GAP insurance for the lease due to paying an up front payment and the monthly payments being roughly depreciation. Is this incorrect?

Given that on a lease the whole point is that you are paying the depreciation, why would GAP be relevant (unless you pay virtually zero up front)?
Avatar
deleted1336857
MrShed

Interesting....my current lease company was very clear that I did not … Interesting....my current lease company was very clear that I did not need GAP insurance for the lease due to paying an up front payment and the monthly payments being roughly depreciation. Is this incorrect?Given that on a lease the whole point is that you are paying the depreciation, why would GAP be relevant (unless you pay virtually zero up front)?



Hi
I think the depreciation on a new (leased) vehicle can be quite substantial once the car is driven away from the dealer.
I guess it depends on the deposit you paid covers that depreciation, but I'm no expert.

There is a number on the bottom of this link, if you have your original lease agreement and to make sure you have not been missold, they may help.
https://www.abi.org.uk/Insurance-and-savings/Products/~/~/media/16515033DA6341D0A4FB00ED908528B7.ashx
I think GAP is very relevant as insurance companies wont pay anywhere near the full value (especially when say a day or so old) of the car.
please let us know what they say.
cheers





Edited by: "deleted1336857" 14th Jun 2016
In fairness in my case, I have the answer in writing from them that a lack of GAP insurance would not leave me with any liability towards them in the case of a claim so I wont push it any further...but its useful to know for my next lease..

The insurance company should absolutely pay the full value of the car though, they just wont pay up to any outstanding finance value?
Avatar
deleted1336857
MrShed

In fairness in my case, I have the answer in writing from them that a … In fairness in my case, I have the answer in writing from them that a lack of GAP insurance would not leave me with any liability towards them in the case of a claim so I wont push it any further...but its useful to know for my next lease..The insurance company should absolutely pay the full value of the car though, they just wont pay up to any outstanding finance value?



Brilliant that you got that in writing.
I think what I was trying to say about insurers not paying full value is there may be a shortfall example on page 4 https://www.abi.org.uk/Insurance-and-savings/Products/~/~/media/16515033DA6341D0A4FB00ED908528B7.ashx which is when GAP comes in.
The owner (lease company) may feel the car is worth more than the insurers are willing to pay.
I think GAP covers you 100% so there is no nasty surprises.
Edited by: "deleted1336857" 14th Jun 2016
deany76

Great recent advice from USA on leasing:"Dealers love leasing because … Great recent advice from USA on leasing:"Dealers love leasing because they can make really appealing monthly payment numbers and the formulas to compute those payments are complex enough most salesmen won't really know how they work, let alone the customers, so it makes hiding extra charges much harder to notice.That said, if you do your homework, just as you are doing, leasing can be a really good way of owning a car if you know what you are doing and follow a few guidelines.First, never put money down on a lease. You want zero down or you don't want it. Any lease can be written with zero down, but they often use large downpayments as a way to advertise a low monthly payment. You don't want to put money down on a lease because if the worst happens and you have an accident with the vehicle early in your ownership, any downpayment is gone. Keep the money in your pocket and pay a higher monthly payment.Second, learn how to calculate the lease payment yourself. There are plenty of guides online, and even apps you can get on your phone like iLeaseCarPro, so you can quickly verify the numbers that any dealer is giving you. If your dealer is not willing to give you every number that goes into calculating your lease payment, find another dealer. Numbers like the money factor and residual are not secret, but many dealers like to make them secret so they can pad them and prevent customers from really knowing what's going on. The residual is set by the manufacturer and can't be altered by the dealer. The money factor is essentially the interest rate set by the lending arm of the manufacturer, and it may be difficult to find the exact number currently being offered, Edmunds forums sometimes have that info for a particular car - so it can be a place for a dealer to hide profit. You should be able to get close to what the real number is though and find a dealer that is somewhere in the ballpark. The buying price is also important in a lease. Negotiate the selling price exactly as if you were purchasing the car. Walk away from any dealer that tells you this isn't possible. You want the biggest spread possible between MSRP and selling price.A lease can be purchased by the lessee at any time for whatever the current payoff is calculated at. If you keep it until lease end you have a few choices. You can turn it in and just be done with it, you can buy the car outright for the buyout, which is negotiable. You'll often get a good deal here because the dealer would rather sell to you than have to take the car back prepare it for sale and resell it to someone else. If the residual was calculated poorly by the manufacturer, you have a few options. This could mean that the car is worth a lot less than expected (in which case you should turn it in and let them take the loss, or use this knowledge to your advantage to buy out the vehicle at a lower price if you want to keep it) or it could be worth much more than expected, in which case, if the gap is large enough, you could buy the vehicle for the agreed-upon buyout price and resell it for a profit on your own (or use this as leverage with the dealer for getting a better deal on a new car). This is the advantage of leasing that most pundits miss; the bank takes all of the risk of depreciation off your hands, while leaving you with a lot of options for using that to your advantage.The downsides are really only if you expect to turn the car in and know that you are really hard on cars. I only suggest leasing for people I know who take pretty good care of their cars because you can get hammered pretty hard for damage or excess wear. So be honest about how you care for your cars in making this decision."



They're clueless. They obviously have never heard of GAP insurance. Irrelevant information when they can't even get the basics correct.
Edited by: "fishmaster" 14th Jun 2016
deany76

Great recent advice from USA on leasing:"Dealers love leasing because … Great recent advice from USA on leasing:"Dealers love leasing because they can make really appealing monthly payment numbers and the formulas to compute those payments are complex enough most salesmen won't really know how they work, let alone the customers, so it makes hiding extra charges much harder.That said, if you do your homework, just as you are doing, leasing can be a really good way of owning a car if you know what you are doing and follow a few guidelines.First, never put money down on a lease. You want zero down or you don't want it. Any lease can be written with zero down, but they often use large downpayments as a way to advertise a low monthly payment. You don't want to put money down on a lease because if the worst happens and you have an accident with the vehicle early in your ownership, any downpayment is gone. Keep the money in your pocket and pay a higher monthly payment.Second, learn how to calculate the lease payment yourself. There are plenty of guides online, and even apps you can get on your phone like iLeaseCarPro, so you can quickly verify the numbers that any dealer is giving you. If your dealer is not willing to give you every number that goes into calculating your lease payment, find another dealer. Numbers like the money factor and residual are not secret, but many dealers like to make them secret so they can pad them and prevent customers from really knowing what's going on. The residual is set by the manufacturer and can't be altered by the dealer. The money factor is essentially the interest rate set by the lending arm of the manufacturer, and it may be difficult to find the exact number currently being offered, Edmunds forums sometimes have that info for a particular car - so it can be a place for a dealer to hide profit. You should be able to get close to what the real number is though and find a dealer that is somewhere in the ballpark. The buying price is also important in a lease. Negotiate the selling price exactly as if you were purchasing the car. Walk away from any dealer that tells you this isn't possible. You want the biggest spread possible between MSRP and selling price.A lease can be purchased by the lessee at any time for whatever the current payoff is calculated at. If you keep it until lease end you have a few choices. You can turn it in and just be done with it, you can buy the car outright for the buyout, which is negotiable. You'll often get a good deal here because the dealer would rather sell to you than have to take the car back prepare it for sale and resell it to someone else. If the residual was calculated poorly by the manufacturer, you have a few options. This could mean that the car is worth a lot less than expected (in which case you should turn it in and let them take the loss, or use this knowledge to your advantage to buy out the vehicle at a lower price if you want to keep it) or it could be worth much more than expected, in which case, if the gap is large enough, you could buy the vehicle for the agreed-upon buyout price and resell it for a profit on your own (or use this as leverage with the dealer for getting a better deal on a new car). This is the advantage of leasing that most pundits miss; the bank takes all of the risk of depreciation off your hands, while leaving you with a lot of options for using that to your advantage.The downsides are really only if you expect to turn the car in and know that you are really hard on cars. I only suggest leasing for people I know who take pretty good care of their cars because you can get hammered pretty hard for damage or excess wear. So be honest about how you care for your cars in making this decision."


Thanks that was helpful. Unfortunately while I take care of my car the three kids dog and wife don't. So I guess I'm stuck buying used.
phatbhoy

Thanks that was helpful. Unfortunately while I take care of my car the … Thanks that was helpful. Unfortunately while I take care of my car the three kids dog and wife don't. So I guess I'm stuck buying used.



I am exactly the same, I want a lease, but with 3 kids it will get messed with pretty quickly! What's the worst they can charge fro scuffed interior, marked seats etc?
juniper

Sportage used to be attractive, now it's fugly. What were they … Sportage used to be attractive, now it's fugly. What were they thinking...



Really? I never liked Sportage, this one looks pretty cool!
I went for this yesterday and just sorted out the paperwork today. Initially picked the solid white (not bothered on colour) to get lowest price but then told that I could have the metalic paint at no extra cost. (white probably depreciates quicker than metals??) And the final quote actually dropped the price by a few pounds. So paying £150.17 for 23 and 1 x 450.52 (3 months) plus 180 admin (rad tax included - which not cheap on this petrol eater). Total £4084 for 2 years. Surely the depreciation is more than that - what price are Kia giving these to the lease companies at? Just the petrol to pay for!
I also prefer the the new exterior sportage look.
Avatar
deleted1336857
peroxidase

I went for this yesterday and just sorted out the paperwork today. … I went for this yesterday and just sorted out the paperwork today. Initially picked the solid white (not bothered on colour) to get lowest price but then told that I could have the metalic paint at no extra cost. (white probably depreciates quicker than metals??) And the final quote actually dropped the price by a few pounds. So paying £150.17 for 23 and 1 x 450.52 (3 months) plus 180 admin (rad tax included - which not cheap on this petrol eater). Total £4084 for 2 years. Surely the depreciation is more than that - what price are Kia giving these to the lease companies at? Just the petrol to pay for!I also prefer the the new exterior sportage look.



Hi

Does your deal include GAP insurance? Or will your insurers cover you for any 'shortfall' during the lease term?

Cheers



Edited by: "deleted1336857" 14th Jun 2016
deany76

Great recent advice from USA on leasing:"Dealers love leasing because … Great recent advice from USA on leasing:"Dealers love leasing because they can make really appealing monthly payment numbers and the formulas to compute those payments are complex enough most salesmen won't really know how they work, let alone the customers, so it makes hiding extra charges much harder to notice.That said, if you do your homework, just as you are doing, leasing can be a really good way of owning a car if you know what you are doing and follow a few guidelines.First, never put money down on a lease. You want zero down or you don't want it. Any lease can be written with zero down, but they often use large downpayments as a way to advertise a low monthly payment. You don't want to put money down on a lease because if the worst happens and you have an accident with the vehicle early in your ownership, any downpayment is gone. Keep the money in your pocket and pay a higher monthly payment.PLEASE NOTE 'GAP' MUST BE TAKEN OUT WITH ZERO DEPOSIT AS THERE WOULD BE A SHORTFALL IF THE CAR IS WRITTEN OFF.Second, learn how to calculate the lease payment yourself. There are plenty of guides online, and even apps you can get on your phone like iLeaseCarPro, so you can quickly verify the numbers that any dealer is giving you. If your dealer is not willing to give you every number that goes into calculating your lease payment, find another dealer. Numbers like the money factor and residual are not secret, but many dealers like to make them secret so they can pad them and prevent customers from really knowing what's going on. The residual is set by the manufacturer and can't be altered by the dealer. The money factor is essentially the interest rate set by the lending arm of the manufacturer, and it may be difficult to find the exact number currently being offered, Edmunds forums sometimes have that info for a particular car - so it can be a place for a dealer to hide profit. You should be able to get close to what the real number is though and find a dealer that is somewhere in the ballpark. The buying price is also important in a lease. Negotiate the selling price exactly as if you were purchasing the car. Walk away from any dealer that tells you this isn't possible. You want the biggest spread possible between MSRP and selling price.A lease can be purchased by the lessee at any time for whatever the current payoff is calculated at. If you keep it until lease end you have a few choices. You can turn it in and just be done with it, you can buy the car outright for the buyout, which is negotiable. You'll often get a good deal here because the dealer would rather sell to you than have to take the car back prepare it for sale and resell it to someone else. If the residual was calculated poorly by the manufacturer, you have a few options. This could mean that the car is worth a lot less than expected (in which case you should turn it in and let them take the loss, or use this knowledge to your advantage to buy out the vehicle at a lower price if you want to keep it) or it could be worth much more than expected, in which case, if the gap is large enough, you could buy the vehicle for the agreed-upon buyout price and resell it for a profit on your own (or use this as leverage with the dealer for getting a better deal on a new car). This is the advantage of leasing that most pundits miss; the bank takes all of the risk of depreciation off your hands, while leaving you with a lot of options for using that to your advantage.The downsides are really only if you expect to turn the car in and know that you are really hard on cars. I only suggest leasing for people I know who take pretty good care of their cars because you can get hammered pretty hard for damage or excess wear. So be honest about how you care for your cars in making this decision."




The majority of this is completely irrelevant in the UK.

All uk lease companies are required to follow the BVRLA fair wear and tear policy which is quite generous regarding the condition of the car on return. for example -
Windscreen
Acceptable - Small scratches outside of drivers eye sight.
Unacceptable - Holes, chips and cracks in the glass, and scratches inside the drivers direct line of sight.
Wheels
Acceptable - Minor scuffage upto 25mm in length. Wheels also meet minimum legal requirements.
Unacceptable - Scoring and other damage to wheel surface. Damage to side walls or uneven tread wear.
Wing Mirrors
Acceptable - Minor scuffage as long as no paintwork is damaged.
Unacceptable - Missing, damaged, or cracked wing mirrors.
Bumpers
Acceptable - Minnor scuffing upto 25mm in length.
Unaccepable - Deep scuffs where paint is broken, dented and cracked areas.
Bodywork
Acceptable - Small areas of chipping. Light scratches up to 25mm in length, relative to the vehicle’s age. Dents up to 10mm providing paint is not broken.
Unaccepable - Stone chips or scratches over 25mm in length that have exposed the bare metal or primer or have rusted. Any impact damage. Multiple dents on a single panel.
Decals
Acceptable - All decals need to be removed and all glue residue removed.
Unacceptable - Any damage caused by the removal of such badges and advertising.
Interior Upholstery
Acceptable - Should be clean and tidy, with only slight wear and soiling through normal use.
Unacceptable - Burns, tears or permanent staining. Any damage caused by the fitting of equipment such as mobile phones.

Full details available here. issuu.com/bfw…703

SO unless you are extremely rough with your car you should be fine. Here are examples of how much VW charge if you are outside of the Fair W and T guidelines:
Dents - not requiring repainting - £36
Body panel damage - requiring repainting - £110
Allow wheel damage - £36
Full valet - £27 - £60


Gap insurance in my opinion is vital and very cheap anyway. ALA now cover your deposit so 3 months down, 6 or 9 makes no difference. Why do you need it?
If your car gets written off and the insurance company payout £3k less than what the car is worth (to the lease company) the gap insurance makes up the difference.

ala.co.uk - There is nearly always a 10% code for ALA (My gap insurance was £98 for the 2 years )

The overall cost of a lease is simple to work out - the deposit plus the monthly payments plus any admin fee, all of these are presented very clearly on any lease site i have ever seen/used. (mainland UK delivery is usually included).
You will obviously have to service the car (in line with manufacturers guideline) like you would any car. You do not usually pay tax it is included in the lease payments and paid by the lease company.

All new cars come with a manufacturers warranty, so if anything goes wrong you can take it back.

I am not saying leasing is for everyone, it isn't but the info in the above post is not accurate in the UK.

Sorry for the long winded post, i am fed up with inaccurate info on lease threads. If we can turn this into a sort of FAQ on lease it can be copied and pasted onto future threads to avoid poor info.

Edited by: "markymark34" 14th Jun 2016
Avatar
deleted1336857
markymark34

The majority of this is completely irrelevant in the UK. All uk lease … The majority of this is completely irrelevant in the UK. All uk lease companies are required to follow the BVRLA fair wear and tear policy which is quite generous regarding the condition of the car on return. for example - WindscreenAcceptable - Small scratches outside of drivers eye sight.Unacceptable - Holes, chips and cracks in the glass, and scratches inside the drivers direct line of sight.Wheels Acceptable - Minor scuffage upto 25mm in length. Wheels also meet minimum legal requirements.Unacceptable - Scoring and other damage to wheel surface. Damage to side walls or uneven tread wear.Wing MirrorsAcceptable - Minor scuffage as long as no paintwork is damaged.Unacceptable - Missing, damaged, or cracked wing mirrors.BumpersAcceptable - Minnor scuffing upto 25mm in length.Unaccepable - Deep scuffs where paint is broken, dented and cracked areas.BodyworkAcceptable - Small areas of chipping. Light scratches up to 25mm in length, relative to the vehicle’s age. Dents up to 10mm providing paint is not broken.Unaccepable - Stone chips or scratches over 25mm in length that have exposed the bare metal or primer or have rusted. Any impact damage. Multiple dents on a single panel.DecalsAcceptable - All decals need to be removed and all glue residue removed.Unacceptable - Any damage caused by the removal of such badges and advertising.Interior UpholsteryAcceptable - Should be clean and tidy, with only slight wear and soiling through normal use.Unacceptable - Burns, tears or permanent staining. Any damage caused by the fitting of equipment such as mobile phones.Full details available here. https://issuu.com/bfwsn67/docs/car_fwt_standard_2016?e=2001091/34033703SO unless you are extremely rough with your car you should be fine. Here are examples of how much VW charge if you are outside of the Fair W and T guidelines:Dents - not requiring repainting - £36Body panel damage - requiring repainting - £110Allow wheel damage - £36Full valet - £27 - £60 Gap insurance in my opinion is vital and very cheap anyway. ALA now cover your deposit so 3 months down, 6 or 9 makes no difference. Why do you need it?If your car gets written off and the insurance company payout £3k less than what the car is worth (to the lease company) the gap insurance makes up the difference. https://www.ala.co.uk - There is nearly always a 10% code for ALA (My gap insurance was £98 for the 2 years )The overall cost of a lease is simple to work out - the deposit plus the monthly payments plus any admin fee, all of these are presented very clearly on any lease site i have ever seen/used. (mainland UK delivery is usually included).You will obviously have to service the car (in line with manufacturers guideline) like you would any car. You do not usually pay tax it is included in the lease payments and paid by the lease company. All new cars come with a manufacturers warranty, so if anything goes wrong you can take it back.I am not saying leasing is for everyone, it isn't but the info in the above post is not accurate in the UK.Sorry for the long winded post, i am fed up with inaccurate info on lease threads. If we can turn this into a sort of FAQ on lease it can be copied and pasted onto future threads to avoid poor info.



Hi Marky
Thanks for taking the time to write your really helpful and informative post for car leasing in the UK.
I wasn't expecting my post to go to the top of the page, your post should!
I think some sort or FAQ page to UK leasing would be excellent for this site.
There are so many deals for leasing here and the importance of GAP and the reasonable cost is rarely mentioned in the title costings.
I have ammended my post with a note at the beginning referring to your post.
thanks again,
deany
markymark34

The majority of this is completely irrelevant in the UK. All uk lease … The majority of this is completely irrelevant in the UK. All uk lease companies are required to follow the BVRLA fair wear and tear policy which is quite generous regarding the condition of the car on return. for example - WindscreenAcceptable - Small scratches outside of drivers eye sight.Unacceptable - Holes, chips and cracks in the glass, and scratches inside the drivers direct line of sight.Wheels Acceptable - Minor scuffage upto 25mm in length. Wheels also meet minimum legal requirements.Unacceptable - Scoring and other damage to wheel surface. Damage to side walls or uneven tread wear.Wing MirrorsAcceptable - Minor scuffage as long as no paintwork is damaged.Unacceptable - Missing, damaged, or cracked wing mirrors.BumpersAcceptable - Minnor scuffing upto 25mm in length.Unaccepable - Deep scuffs where paint is broken, dented and cracked areas.BodyworkAcceptable - Small areas of chipping. Light scratches up to 25mm in length, relative to the vehicle’s age. Dents up to 10mm providing paint is not broken.Unaccepable - Stone chips or scratches over 25mm in length that have exposed the bare metal or primer or have rusted. Any impact damage. Multiple dents on a single panel.DecalsAcceptable - All decals need to be removed and all glue residue removed.Unacceptable - Any damage caused by the removal of such badges and advertising.Interior UpholsteryAcceptable - Should be clean and tidy, with only slight wear and soiling through normal use.Unacceptable - Burns, tears or permanent staining. Any damage caused by the fitting of equipment such as mobile phones.Full details available here. https://issuu.com/bfwsn67/docs/car_fwt_standard_2016?e=2001091/34033703SO unless you are extremely rough with your car you should be fine. Here are examples of how much VW charge if you are outside of the Fair W and T guidelines:Dents - not requiring repainting - £36Body panel damage - requiring repainting - £110Allow wheel damage - £36Full valet - £27 - £60 Gap insurance in my opinion is vital and very cheap anyway. ALA now cover your deposit so 3 months down, 6 or 9 makes no difference. Why do you need it?If your car gets written off and the insurance company payout £3k less than what the car is worth (to the lease company) the gap insurance makes up the difference. https://www.ala.co.uk - There is nearly always a 10% code for ALA (My gap insurance was £98 for the 2 years )The overall cost of a lease is simple to work out - the deposit plus the monthly payments plus any admin fee, all of these are presented very clearly on any lease site i have ever seen/used. (mainland UK delivery is usually included).You will obviously have to service the car (in line with manufacturers guideline) like you would any car. You do not usually pay tax it is included in the lease payments and paid by the lease company. All new cars come with a manufacturers warranty, so if anything goes wrong you can take it back.I am not saying leasing is for everyone, it isn't but the info in the above post is not accurate in the UK.Sorry for the long winded post, i am fed up with inaccurate info on lease threads. If we can turn this into a sort of FAQ on lease it can be copied and pasted onto future threads to avoid poor info.





Very helpful.
deany76

HiDoes your deal include GAP insurance? Or will your insurers cover you … HiDoes your deal include GAP insurance? Or will your insurers cover you for any 'shortfall' during the lease term?Cheers



​Didn't ask lease company but will look at gap insurance in more detail over next few weeks. I am virgin leaser so learning a lot quickly.
markymark34

The majority of this is completely irrelevant in the UK. All uk lease … The majority of this is completely irrelevant in the UK. All uk lease companies are required to follow the BVRLA fair wear and tear policy which is quite generous regarding the condition of the car on return. for example - WindscreenAcceptable - Small scratches outside of drivers eye sight.Unacceptable - Holes, chips and cracks in the glass, and scratches inside the drivers direct line of sight.Wheels Acceptable - Minor scuffage upto 25mm in length. Wheels also meet minimum legal requirements.Unacceptable - Scoring and other damage to wheel surface. Damage to side walls or uneven tread wear.Wing MirrorsAcceptable - Minor scuffage as long as no paintwork is damaged.Unacceptable - Missing, damaged, or cracked wing mirrors.BumpersAcceptable - Minnor scuffing upto 25mm in length.Unaccepable - Deep scuffs where paint is broken, dented and cracked areas.BodyworkAcceptable - Small areas of chipping. Light scratches up to 25mm in length, relative to the vehicle’s age. Dents up to 10mm providing paint is not broken.Unaccepable - Stone chips or scratches over 25mm in length that have exposed the bare metal or primer or have rusted. Any impact damage. Multiple dents on a single panel.DecalsAcceptable - All decals need to be removed and all glue residue removed.Unacceptable - Any damage caused by the removal of such badges and advertising.Interior UpholsteryAcceptable - Should be clean and tidy, with only slight wear and soiling through normal use.Unacceptable - Burns, tears or permanent staining. Any damage caused by the fitting of equipment such as mobile phones.Full details available here. https://issuu.com/bfwsn67/docs/car_fwt_standard_2016?e=2001091/34033703SO unless you are extremely rough with your car you should be fine. Here are examples of how much VW charge if you are outside of the Fair W and T guidelines:Dents - not requiring repainting - £36Body panel damage - requiring repainting - £110Allow wheel damage - £36Full valet - £27 - £60 Gap insurance in my opinion is vital and very cheap anyway. ALA now cover your deposit so 3 months down, 6 or 9 makes no difference. Why do you need it?If your car gets written off and the insurance company payout £3k less than what the car is worth (to the lease company) the gap insurance makes up the difference. https://www.ala.co.uk - There is nearly always a 10% code for ALA (My gap insurance was £98 for the 2 years )The overall cost of a lease is simple to work out - the deposit plus the monthly payments plus any admin fee, all of these are presented very clearly on any lease site i have ever seen/used. (mainland UK delivery is usually included).You will obviously have to service the car (in line with manufacturers guideline) like you would any car. You do not usually pay tax it is included in the lease payments and paid by the lease company. All new cars come with a manufacturers warranty, so if anything goes wrong you can take it back.I am not saying leasing is for everyone, it isn't but the info in the above post is not accurate in the UK.Sorry for the long winded post, i am fed up with inaccurate info on lease threads. If we can turn this into a sort of FAQ on lease it can be copied and pasted onto future threads to avoid poor info.


Extremely useful thanks. I've got an old Honda that I had from new that now needs to go and I haven't been in the position to do anything about. I'm now looking at leasing for the first time so all this info really helps. I have tried researching already but there isn't (as far as I've found) a one-stop-shop for all this type of info. E.g. I knew nothing about gap insurance, the type of wear and tear that is acceptable etc.
I applied online last night, what happens now, how long do I have to wait for the yes or no?
HXL

I applied online last night, what happens now, how long do I have to wait … I applied online last night, what happens now, how long do I have to wait for the yes or no?


Did you apply for finance as well as generate quote?
Finance is usually agreed on the same day.
They will then want admin/ process fee and scanned driving license and proof of residence. Car is then ordered from manufacturer. Could easily all be done tomorrow. Probably looking at mid - late september for delivery.
Edited by: "peroxidase" 15th Jun 2016
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