Citroen C1 Flair - reversing camera, air con, DAB radio, metallic paint, tinted rear windows, etc. - 12 month personal lease - 10,000 miles - £249 deposit & £83 per month  £1342.00 @ gateway2lease
1495°Expired

Citroen C1 Flair - reversing camera, air con, DAB radio, metallic paint, tinted rear windows, etc. - 12 month personal lease - 10,000 miles - £249 deposit & £83 per month £1342.00 @ gateway2lease

246
Found 30th Jun 2015
Cheapest C1 deal that I've come across on HUKD so far. Equivalent to £111 per month - cheaper than my neighbour's Sky package. The Flair model is the better spec out of the 3 trims within the C1 range.

£11k list price.

1st monthly installment - £249.
11 monthly payments of £83.
Admin fee of £180.

Total payable over term £1342.

Previous C1 deals were £1400 for a lower spec C1.

246 Comments

Great price! But your neighbour is paying too much for Sky.......

Original Poster

Edward_Nigma

Great price! But your neighbour is paying too much for Sky.......



X)

I did help them halve the price over a year ago but they haven't phoned them this year.

It's in my best interest to help them though as I get access to their Sky Go.

karlie88

X)I did help them halve the price over a year ago but they haven't phoned … X)I did help them halve the price over a year ago but they haven't phoned them this year.It's in my best interest to help them though as I get access to their Sky Go.


Fair enough, best keep quiet for now then

Reversing Camera? Is that a mis-print?

Original Poster

lozmeister

Reversing Camera? Is that a mis-print?



Nope. It's present on the C1 Flair as standard.

still £111.83 a month all in so not that great

adamsxi

still £111.83 a month all in so not that great

You've seen better?
Please share

Is it definitely 5dr?

When u return car with few marks etc do they charge a lot on return ?

excess mileage charge?

3 door

Never heard of Onkyo, go for a well brand like Sony!

Oh wait wrong and ignorant presumptuous HUKD copy and paste response of a comment for a deal that doesn't apply to me

Looking forward to the bargenomics lot arriving

bestmd

When u return car with few marks etc do they charge a lot on return ?


I've had a few lease cars over the years, never taken great care of any of them. Generally speaking as long as it's clean on return and the scratches/bumps are easy enough to explain (like stone chips at the front) they can't really do much, oh they may try to get you to pay up but realistically because it's wear and tear they're stuffed.

Bumps/scrapes on the rear/sides would be an entirely different matter though.

Reversing camera for a toy car?? Seriously

I always think these deals are ok but always think they should do the average 12000 or 15000 a year mileage allowance.

serious question: what happens at the end of the lease? you just hand the car back? or do you trade it in against something? what about depreciation? I'm curious about getting a lease car on something like this but don't really know how it works

Well, it might be a bit early before the lease-haters arrive, but what the heck, I'll insert my new two-part guide for anyone that needs some help:A Brief Guide to Personal Lease Deals

Leasing a car is a very hot topic on HUKD. There are a lot of lease deals that make it “hot” on HUKD, but there are a lot of negative connotations and/or misconceptions from both benefits and negatives of leasing.

If you’re not ready for a long read let’s take an approach for tldr;

“These deals get hot for a reason, which is usually that the total payments over the term, are less than what the car will depreciate over the same time, if you bought it outright. If you don't understand this, don’t post silly comments – try instead to use that time to understand why the deal is considered hot.”

What is a vehicle lease?
A lease is a financing method to get you into a new car. There are other options of owning/driving vehicles, but this guide refers to leasing new vehicles, which is what most car deals on here are about.
Note that it is a legal contract in which a person enters into.

You pay a deposit (flexible) and fixed monthly payment, in order to drive the vehicle, over a set period of time (agreed at the start of the lease). You will agree a mileage per annum and likely incur a charge per mile, if this is exceeded. Some deals will include servicing, tyres and breakdown. Some, do not.

After the set period expires, you simply hand the car back and walk away.

What about business leasing?
That’s a bit more complicated. Refer to your firm’s accountant or fleet manager for more information – business leases (ex VAT pricing) can appear very attractive, but come with some other more complex calculations as part of the legal requirements. Most deals on HUKD refer to personal leases, so this is not covered.

Leasing sounds like a waste of money – who leases a car?!
Lots of people lease cars, because for them, it is efficient. Some lease because it suits their current requirements. Other people may lease a car because of perceived status of being seen in a new car, if you believe everything you read. It’s best to consider some worked examples to understand better.

People who have a lump sum of cash – enough to buy a car outright – may consider leasing a car instead. It depends on how long they intend to keep the vehicle for and whether the lease options work for them.

People who have company car allowances, often find that personal leasing opens up better options than their respective company car schemes and allows a change more frequently.

There are many reasons as to why someone would choose to lease a car, but the take-away from this ultimately is: if it’s not right for you, doesn’t mean that it’s not right for everyone.

Cynic’s corner (aka the narrow minded): “People who want to be flashy but don’t have enough money to afford a car are the only people who lease cars. These people are shallow and try to “keep up with the Jones’s” and will get themselves into financial ruin, because they are too poor to buy a car normally.”

Response: Rubbish. While there are obviously people who will buy all sorts of goods for outward perception, there are plenty more who don’t.

That still sounds like wasted money though. Why would anyone lease when you don’t get to own the car and keep it?
There are many advantages to leasing a new car, some require examples to explain, but others are more obvious.

The most obvious is depreciation. Sadly, cars depreciate - over time, they are worth less. The more miles they have done, the less they generally tend to be worth. Same for outright age. Same for general condition.

All of these things combined, contribute to a perceived worth of the vehicle. This isn’t set in stone, but a lot of people (accountants!) work to one of three methods:

Straight line depreciation (i.e. book value of £20k, depreciate 20% per year over 5 years – whatever it sells for at the end is a bonus)
Reducing/declining balance depreciation (i.e. £20k at purchase less 30% after year 1 = (20-6=£14k); after year two = (14-4.2=9.8k) and so on)
• Market value (i.e. manually revalue your asset based on what the market will be prepared to pay – this is influenced by supply and demand)

The reality is that the third option and a mix of the first two, will be used by lease companies, in order to work out what a vehicle will be worth in the future. It’s open to a number of variables, but is a guide at least.

Let’s try a worked example on a fictitious car that costs £20,000 to buy outright. This car has been serviced properly, is in good working order and has average mileage on the clock. The alternative lease term is a 9+23 deal at £203 per month with £150 admin fee.
Cost today: £20,000
Market value in 2 years: £12,000
Depreciation amount: £8,000 / 40% (or 20% per annum if you like)
Lease payments total: £6,650 (9x£203 deposit + 23x£203 monthly payments +£150 admin fee = £6,646 rounded up to £6,650)

If the lease deal you’re looking at, over the same time period, is less than the £8,000 on the same fictitious car (which our example is!), there are some efficiencies to be had. These are numerous and not limited to:

1. Assuming you bought the car outright, you have tied up £20k of cash in a depreciating asset, which is cash that could otherwise earn some interest in an ISA or equivalent savings account. It may be modest, but it is also essentially cash in hand – which is a very valuable asset.
2. Owned outright or leased, the car will depreciate. In this lease, you are paying less than the car will likely depreciate, which is efficient. If the amount you will pay is MORE than what the expected depreciation is likely to be, then the lease deal may not be efficient.
3. In two years, there may be negotiations involved, in selling the car you own outright. Some people may get a better deal than others, but a lease deal is simple: you hand it back.
4. The lease option allows you to take the cash-flow approach and manage your payments monthly, instead of up-front cash. This is useful for people who are able to afford the monthly payments, but don’t have the cash to hand right now. This is likely the case for most people, be it in the form of car allowances paid monthly, or disposable income from a salary/pay cheque etc.
New cars and higher RRSP cars depreciate faster than used cars, because of the “percentage” methods above! As a result, used cars can often appear as a great deal, but more on that later.


Edited by: "cactusbrandy" 30th Jun 2015

Here are some general pros to leasing:
• You get in to a new car
• Can be cheaper than buying new (depreciation concept)
• You benefit from not paying the initial registration fee/tax
• Vehicle excise duty is not your responsibility (note: in most cases - some leases may exclude VED in the quoted prices)
• If the car is kept for under three years, there are no MOTs to worry about
• Leased cars spread costs out over the term of the lease. This is basic cash-flow. This is fundamental to business and life in general. Smooth cash flow, means a smooth life. No bottle-necks or lump sums.
• The lump sum up front is flexible in the deposit, but not the full amount of the car. It can be as low as one monthly payment or as high as 12 payments and upwards.
• New cars have a perception of being “more reliable” and will be covered under at least a three year manufacturer warranty.
• You have the perceived benefits of a new car: technology, safety, comfort, reliability.
• The agreement/contract is not secured (i.e. you won’t lose your house, like you could if you stopped paying the mortgage).
• Some deals include maintenance (servicing, tyres etc) as part of the package deal.
• Cosmetic damage is covered by BVRLA guidelines, which is fair and not unreasonable.

Here are some general cons to leasing:
• You will enter into a legally binding contract.
• If you cannot afford the monthly payments, you will be at risk of damaging your credit score.
• You need to have fully-comprehensive insurance or face a potential shortfall upon write-off.
• If your car is written off during the lease term, you may be at risk if the payments outstanding are greater than the pay-out from insurance; you’d need to purchase gap insurance to cover this shortfall.
• Many lease companies stipulate that the tyres you put on the car, are the same as the factory fit – these can often be very costly compared to your normal favourite quality tyre.
• Mercedes (and potentially others) may stipulate that you MUST use a Mercedes garage for servicing; you otherwise find that you must use genuine manufacturer parts/liquids as part of the annual/periodic service in order to meet the terms of the lease agreement.
• If your lease payments are very high, you might not get the efficiencies that many experience and you could be out of pocket compared to other methods of obtaining a vehicle to drive.
• If you don’t like the car, you’re tied into a contract and may find the release clause to be expensive.
• Some insurance companies don’t appropriately handle the registered owner being a lease firm, with the registered keeper being you, the driver (most are fine, however).
• Your mileage is limited to what is agreed at the start of the lease, though there may be a fee per excess mile (usually between 5p-10p per mile – be aware that many firms don’t quote this figure including VAT).
• If you really like the car, there is not likely to be an option to purchase it.
• There may be additional administration charges that are not immediately clear at first.
• You are required to be credit checked – if you have poor credit, you may not be approved for a lease.
• If you don’t look after the car, severe dents/scratches *may* be charged for.

Here are some general neutrals to leasing:
• You still need to insure the vehicle.
• The car will still need to be looked after as if it is your own.
• Your car will need to be serviced and maintained as if it was your own (log book stamps etc)
• In a >3 year lease, you will need to pay for MOTs
• In a >3 year lease or where manufacturer warranty expires during the lease, faults will need to be repaired by you

Okay, I sort of see where you’re going with this. Why not get a bank loan and buy outright or do a PCP deal?
A bank loan is a viable alternative to leasing, if you wish to own the car for longer than a lease agreement will allow. This works well for people who want to own over 5+ years and may not have the cash to hand right now, but know that future cash flow leaves them at risk.

With a bank loan, there is interest to pay. This can vary between banks and is also dependent on the base rate set by the Bank of England. Right now, some loans are quite attractive. In a year or two, they may not. It’s a risk you face, sadly.
Otherwise, you could also consider a PCP deal, which is similar to leasing, but gives people the option of buying the car at the end, as well as giving it back. Sometimes, it may also be possible to trade for another vehicle and maintain the same monthly payments. PCP often requires sizeable up-front cash sums (greater than a lease!) and will also have a finance charge involved on the finance taken out.

So why not just buy second hand and own outright?
This is the age-old argument to most of the vehicle lease deals that are posted here. Let’s start with the obvious.
• This is for a new car deal, not a used car deal
• You don’t go on to a deal for apples and say “cold, oranges are cheaper” (after all, both are still fruit – same thing – right?!)

But let’s entertain the concept for a minute, because some people may be undecided about new vs used.
Used cars can be a bargain, but at the same time, they can be a big risk. We’ve pretty much all had a used car and have a bunch of different anecdotal stories about good and bad examples of said cars.

Here are some general pros to buying used:
• You get more choice of used vehicles, with more varied specifications
• Mileage is only limited to what you have agreed with your insurance company (but is otherwise unlimited)
• You can sell the car on at any time
• You can make modifications to the car if you see fit to do so
• Cash sums involved are much less (in most cases)
• Depreciation will be smaller in actual terms, though similar in percentage terms to a new car
• The car you buy may run 100% for years and cost you very little before selling on for minimal loss (i.e. equivalent to a fraction of the cost of a lease deal)

Here are some general cons to buying used:
• Older cars will need to be put through an MOT
• As a car ages, the risk of repairs increases the more miles it has done and the older it gets
• If you have significant repair bills, you could end up paying more than a lease deal over the same period of ownership
• The car will still depreciate
• You may only be able to access cars with lower specification equipment and safety features for the money you have available
• The condition of the car (visually/mechanically) may not be easy to establish initially (you have come-back if it’s known about before selling to you however)
• A lump sum is still required (loan or otherwise) and tied up in the car; if the car is broken beyond repair, your money is lost.
• Selling used cars can be a drag, with tyre kickers and people being unrealistic with offers.
There is nothing wrong with buying an older used car. But it is important to remember that buying a car via a lease or outright as used is a financial risk in both instances – it is down to the individual to make this assessment or seek advice before making any commitment.

Golden rules for everyone:
• If you can't afford the payments (lease, loan or PCP), don't do it. This is obvious; this is a general rule of thumb for any financial commitment. Lease deals, like credit cards, are not evil tools of the modern world. They are tools to be made use of, if you know how best to utilise them to their maximum effect.
• If you don't want a NEW car, don't do it. There is no obligation. Nobody is forcing you.
• If you want to take the risks on buying a used car and the associated benefits of it being reliable and costing next to nil to maintain, before selling onwards, don't lease a car.
• If you don't understand leasing, don't do it.
• it is important to remember that buying a car via a lease or outright as used is a financial risk in both instances – it is down to the individual to make this assessment or seek advice before making any commitment

Platinum rules for everyone (take these at face value):
If it appreciates in value, you should seek to BUY IT.
If it depreciates, and it’s efficient to do so, you should seek to RENT IT.

n.b. there are occasional exceptions to the rule. Cars are not really one of those exceptions

If you're still unsure:
Think of a holiday. You spend £2000+. At the end of it, you don't get to keep the hotel to sell on. Nor the swimming pool, aircraft or airport. You have nothing to show for it except a tan (if you're lucky, unlike me). You have, however, had the benefit of enjoyment of that holiday for the time period that you were there.
A car is not dissimilar. You benefit from using the car before parting with it. Lease deals are great for people who want new cars and don't want to tie up vast sums of cold, hard cash up-front.



Edited by: "cactusbrandy" 30th Jun 2015

chrisf74

Reversing camera for a toy car?? Seriously



lol. Yup. Give someone a car like this (cameras, sat navs, power everything) and then stick them in a mk.4 Cortina with a towbolt on the back and see how they get on! X)

(I drove said Cortina in the mid-90's and even then no-one pulled out in front of you ANYWHERE cos they knew you were driving a total bucket and wouldn't really care if you ploughed into them ...)

Original Poster

mivanpy

I always think these deals are ok but always think they should do the … I always think these deals are ok but always think they should do the average 12000 or 15000 a year mileage allowance.



Average annual mileage per car is 8,000 miles in the UK - so 10k should be sufficient for the majority of people.

Got a C1 deal from G2L last time the offers were on. Car arrived exactly as described and only paying 71.99 pm for a brand new 5 door 1.2 Feel model. For a Flair this is a good deal.
The other thing is that it is worth checking what happens after 12 months. On my deal I can keep the car for as many extra months as I want at 71.99 so getting more value from the 3 months upfront payment and admin fee I.e at the end you can return it or keep renting on same basis until another good deal comes along. Oh yeah not an Audi, BMW etc

neoboy

Never heard of Onkyo, go for a well brand like Sony!



Don't DO that! You're spiking my blood pressure with inflammatory stuff like that.
Edited by: "gbmcginty" 30th Jun 2015

Might have done an essay thread hijack, but, in before the haters! Result!

karlie88

Average annual mileage per car is 8,000 miles in the UK - so 10k should … Average annual mileage per car is 8,000 miles in the UK - so 10k should be sufficient for the majority of people.



Ive always understood it to be 12000 that went upto 15000. Dont remember the source but probs hear say.

Same as Andy - in fact the car was delivered last Tuesday. Done about 200 miles so far - perfectly fine bumming around town, rural roads and even sits at 80 on the M6 without stressing too much. Touchscreen audio system is pretty good - very happy with the DAB system. The IOS InCar app doesn't work, but that's a software problem, so it'll either be fixed or not Bluetooth works fine.

It's not the most exciting car in the world, but for £72 a month, I'm extremely happy with it. I'm also amused at how much I can push the plastic in on the bumpers and arches. The C1 feels bigger than you'd imagine, and I don't feel like I'm so small I can be bullied by idiots.

In fact, I might even forward this deal to mate of mine who was impressed with the deal I got, but wanted something with alloys.

Original Poster

mivanpy

Ive always understood it to be 12000 that went upto 15000. Dont remember … Ive always understood it to be 12000 that went upto 15000. Dont remember the source but probs hear say.



Business cars perhaps, but not your average household car:

racfoundation.org/mot…ity

karlie88

Business cars perhaps, but not your average household … Business cars perhaps, but not your average household car:http://www.racfoundation.org/motoring-faqs/mobility#a23



Not my household car lol
Although on that link it states 13000 for diesel cars.
Edited by: "mivanpy" 30th Jun 2015

Can only be hot at that price, and 10K miles is generous considering the sort of car it is - you wont buy a C1 if you do lots of long journies.

neoboy

Never heard of Onkyo, go for a well brand like Sony!Oh wait wrong and … Never heard of Onkyo, go for a well brand like Sony!Oh wait wrong and ignorant presumptuous HUKD copy and paste response of a comment for a deal that doesn't apply to me :/Looking forward to the bargenomics lot arriving



lol

Does anyone know if the admin fee is taken along with the initial payment, up-front? Or is it added to the monthly payment?
Edited by: "smokinhot" 30th Jun 2015

Sorry for my dumb question but at the end of 12 months what happens to the so called initial deposit? I dont think its a deposit that you get back, is it?

hijigu

Sorry for my dumb question but at the end of 12 months what happens to … Sorry for my dumb question but at the end of 12 months what happens to the so called initial deposit? I dont think its a deposit that you get back, is it?



It's not a deposit, and they don't refer to it as one. It's an initial payment (I mis-spoke in my above comment).

andyeckford

Got a C1 deal from G2L last time the offers were on. Car arrived exactly … Got a C1 deal from G2L last time the offers were on. Car arrived exactly as described and only paying 71.99 pm for a brand new 5 door 1.2 Feel model. For a Flair this is a good deal.The other thing is that it is worth checking what happens after 12 months. On my deal I can keep the car for as many extra months as I want at 71.99 so getting more value from the 3 months upfront payment and admin fee I.e at the end you can return it or keep renting on same basis until another good deal comes along. Oh yeah not an Audi, BMW etc



Did you have to negotiate with them to be allowed to keep it after the 12 months for the same monthly cost?

So, you pay over a thousand pounds and at the end of it you've got nothing? What's the point in that?!!
You may as well buy a car for a grand and then sell it after the year is up - you'll definitely get some money back.

For instance, my wife's girlfriend's sister's dog's best friend bought an old Lamborghini Countach for a grand and then, after a year, sold it for nearly that much anyway!

reversing camera lol

that's like putting a reversing camera on a roller skate lol

heat added though, great deal

smokinhot

Does anyone know if the admin fee is taken along with the initial … Does anyone know if the admin fee is taken along with the initial payment, up-front? Or is it added to the monthly payment?



It's taken separately, as it goes to G2L and not Citroen. Before your first payment.

bell6367

So, you pay over a thousand pounds and at the end of it you've got … So, you pay over a thousand pounds and at the end of it you've got nothing? What's the point in that?!!You may as well buy a car for a grand and then sell it after the year is up - you'll definitely get some money back.For instance, my wife's girlfriend's sister's dog's best friend bought an old Lamborghini Countach for a grand and then, after a year, sold it for nearly that much anyway!



*logs off*

lovelybeer

Here are some general pros to leasing:• You get in to a new car• Can be ch … Here are some general pros to leasing:• You get in to a new car• Can be cheaper than buying new (depreciation concept)• You benefit from not paying the initial registration fee/tax• Vehicle excise duty is not your responsibility• If the car is kept for under three years, there are no MOTs to worry about• Leased cars spread costs out over the term of the lease. This is basic cash-flow. This is fundamental to business and life in general. Smooth cash flow, means a smooth life. No bottle-necks or lump sums.• The lump sum up front is flexible in the deposit, but not the full amount of the car. It can be as low as one monthly payment or as high as 12 payments and upwards.• New cars have a perception of being “more reliable” and will be covered under at least a three year manufacturer warranty.• You have the perceived benefits of a new car: technology, safety, comfort, reliability.• The agreement/contract is not secured (i.e. you won’t lose your house, like you could if you stopped paying the mortgage).• Some deals include maintenance (servicing, tyres etc) as part of the package deal.• Cosmetic damage is covered by BVRLA guidelines, which is fair and not unreasonable.Here are some general cons to leasing:• You will enter into a legally binding contract.• If you cannot afford the monthly payments, you will be at risk of damaging your credit score.• You need to have fully-comprehensive insurance or face a potential shortfall upon write-off.• If your car is written off during the lease term, you may be at risk if the payments outstanding are greater than the pay-out from insurance; you’d need to purchase gap insurance to cover this shortfall.• Many lease companies stipulate that the tyres you put on the car, are the same as the factory fit – these can often be very costly compared to your normal favourite quality tyre.• Mercedes (and potentially others) may stipulate that you MUST use a Mercedes garage for servicing; you otherwise find that you must use genuine manufacturer parts/liquids as part of the annual/periodic service in order to meet the terms of the lease agreement.• If your lease payments are very high, you might not get the efficiencies that many experience and you could be out of pocket compared to other methods of obtaining a vehicle to drive.• If you don’t like the car, you’re tied into a contract and may find the release clause to be expensive.• Some insurance companies don’t appropriately handle the registered owner being a lease firm, with the registered keeper being you, the driver (most are fine, however).• Your mileage is limited to what is agreed at the start of the lease, though there may be a fee per excess mile (usually between 5p-10p per mile – be aware that many firms don’t quote this figure including VAT).• If you really like the car, there is not likely to be an option to purchase it.• There may be additional administration charges that are not immediately clear at first.• You are required to be credit checked – if you have poor credit, you may not be approved for a lease.• If you don’t look after the car, severe dents/scratches *may* be charged for. Here are some general neutrals to leasing:• You still need to insure the vehicle.• The car will still need to be looked after as if it is your own.• Your car will need to be serviced and maintained as if it was your own (log book stamps etc)• In a >3 year lease, you will need to pay for MOTs• In a >3 year lease or where manufacturer warranty expires during the lease, faults will need to be repaired by youOkay, I sort of see where you’re going with this. Why not get a bank loan and buy outright or do a PCP deal?A bank loan is a viable alternative to leasing, if you wish to own the car for longer than a lease agreement will allow. This works well for people who want to own over 5+ years and may not have the cash to hand right now, but know that future cash flow leaves them at risk.With a bank loan, there is interest to pay. This can vary between banks and is also dependent on the base rate set by the Bank of England. Right now, some loans are quite attractive. In a year or two, they may not. It’s a risk you face, sadly. Otherwise, you could also consider a PCP deal, which is similar to leasing, but gives people the option of buying the car at the end, as well as giving it back. Sometimes, it may also be possible to trade for another vehicle and maintain the same monthly payments. PCP often requires sizeable up-front cash sums (greater than a lease!) and will also have a finance charge involved on the finance taken out. So why not just buy second hand and own outright?This is the age-old argument to most of the vehicle lease deals that are posted here. Let’s start with the obvious.• This is for a new car deal, not a used car deal• You don’t go on to a deal for apples and say “cold, oranges are cheaper” (after all, both are still fruit – same thing – right?!)But let’s entertain the concept for a minute, because some people may be undecided about new vs used.Used cars can be a bargain, but at the same time, they can be a big risk. We’ve pretty much all had a used car and have a bunch of different anecdotal stories about good and bad examples of said cars. Here are some general pros to buying used:• You get more choice of used vehicles, with more varied specifications• Mileage is only limited to what you have agreed with your insurance company (but is otherwise unlimited)• You can sell the car on at any time• You can make modifications to the car if you see fit to do so• Cash sums involved are much less (in most cases)• Depreciation will be smaller in actual terms, though similar in percentage terms to a new car• The car you buy may run 100% for years and cost you very little before selling on for minimal loss (i.e. equivalent to a fraction of the cost of a lease deal)Here are some general cons to buying used:• Older cars will need to be put through an MOT• As a car ages, the risk of repairs increases the more miles it has done and the older it gets• If you have significant repair bills, you could end up paying more than a lease deal over the same period of ownership• The car will still depreciate• You may only be able to access cars with lower specification equipment and safety features for the money you have available• The condition of the car (visually/mechanically) may not be easy to establish initially (you have come-back if it’s known about before selling to you however)• A lump sum is still required (loan or otherwise) and tied up in the car; if the car is broken beyond repair, your money is lost.• Selling used cars can be a drag, with tyre kickers and people being unrealistic with offers.There is nothing wrong with buying an older used car. But it is important to remember that buying a car via a lease or outright as used is a financial risk in both instances – it is down to the individual to make this assessment or seek advice before making any commitment.Golden rules for everyone:• If you can't afford the payments (lease, loan or PCP), don't do it. This is obvious; this is a general rule of thumb for any financial commitment. Lease deals, like credit cards, are not evil tools of the modern world. They are tools to be made use of, if you know how best to utilise them to their maximum effect.• If you don't want a NEW car, don't do it. There is no obligation. Nobody is forcing you.• If you want to take the risks on buying a used car and the associated benefits of it being reliable and costing next to nil to maintain, before selling onwards, don't lease a car.• If you don't understand leasing, don't do it.• it is important to remember that buying a car via a lease or outright as used is a financial risk in both instances – it is down to the individual to make this assessment or seek advice before making any commitmentPlatinum rules for everyone (take these at face value):If it appreciates in value, you should seek to BUY IT.If it depreciates, and it’s efficient to do so, you should seek to RENT IT.n.b. there are occasional exceptions to the rule. Cars are not really one of those exceptionsIf you're still unsure:Think of a holiday. You spend £2000+. At the end of it, you don't get to keep the hotel to sell on. Nor the swimming pool, aircraft or airport. You have nothing to show for it except a tan (if you're lucky, unlike me). You have, however, had the benefit of enjoyment of that holiday for the time period that you were there.A car is not dissimilar. You benefit from using the car before parting with it. Lease deals are great for people who want new cars and don't want to tie up vast sums of cold, hard cash up-front.



That is probably the best answer I could have hoped for. Thanks and well done for effort!

mrobbo

*logs off*



"logs back on and reads through to the end this time..."

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karlie88

X)I did help them halve the price over a year ago but they haven't phoned … X)I did help them halve the price over a year ago but they haven't phoned them this year.It's in my best interest to help them though as I get access to their Sky Go.



I pay £98 a month for sky........
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