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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) (CBT Anxiety & Cognitive Psychology Series) Kindle Edition - Free Download @ Amazon
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) (CBT Anxiety & Cognitive Psychology Series) Kindle Edition - Free Download @ Amazon

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Posted 16th Nov 2019

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Paperback is £12.99
Do you feel anxious all the time?
Are you frustrated with certain areas of your life?
Do you feel like you’re not really living up to your fullest potential and this is grinding you down?
Does it seem like you burn out easily?


If any of these apply to you and you don’t want to take potentially harmful chemicals to gain a sense of peace and balance, I have good news for you.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or CBT for short might be the treatment you’ve been looking for. Completely chemical-free and natural, it uses your own mind’s internal processes and ability to make associations to unleash a better version of yourself.

This book explains what CBT is, how it works, and how you can benefit from it. It also guides you through a 10 step process where your awareness of how your mind works can lead to greater personal happiness, peace, and joy.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2009 KB
  • Print Length: 81 pages

  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B07JC6PL46
  • Text-to-Speech Enabled
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I actually teach CBT so thought I'd weigh in.

You need a certain level of intelligence (self-awareness) for this to work and be really effective as the whole premise for it is based on the concept that it is your thoughts causing your emotions (for which there is a significant amount of evidence on).

CBT follows what's known as the ABC model : Activating event > Belief (or thought) > Consequence.

So in short, something happens (activating event), you have a thought or belief about it and this subsequently causes your emotions or behaviour (consequences).

People receiving CBT for things like anxiety, depression or negative emotions is based on the idea that for some reason, your internal thought patterns have become incredibly negative. So that internal dialogue you have with yourself that many people don't really recognise is happening (until you look out for it) has become toxic, you're feeding yourself negative thoughts about yourself, your life, the world, the situation you find yourself in and around you and just like smoking is a habitual behaviour, these thought patterns have become habitual too and 'stuck' in this type of way of thinking.

Effectively, you need to start telling yourself positive things and see the positives in every situation as well as challenge those irrational thoughts through using rational, logic, pragmatism and ultimately looking at the bigger picture.

It does work but you need to be incredibly resilient too; it changed my own life when I started applying it to myself but its not a magic bullet, you cant just think positive thoughts, you need to follow this up with action too and steps to improve your situation dependent on the problem.
These things tend to work a treat if there's nothing actually wrong with you.
I have all these free books I'll never read
Someonetookmyusername16/11/2019 17:41

Anyone had a council or NHS private funded version of this? Might get it …Anyone had a council or NHS private funded version of this? Might get it as to me marking everything on a 1-10 system made me give up hope. Don't know if this would be better if anyone's tried it


I'm having NHS CBT at the moment. They use the 1-10 scoring system to assess your symptoms and monitor your progress. If you need help I massively recommend CBT, it's been as good as SSRI meds for me
129 Comments
Thanks.
Anyone had a council or NHS private funded version of this? Might get it as to me marking everything on a 1-10 system made me give up hope. Don't know if this would be better if anyone's tried it
Edited by: "Someonetookmyusername" 16th Nov 2019
I have all these free books I'll never read
Someonetookmyusername16/11/2019 17:41

Anyone had a council or NHS private funded version of this? Might get it …Anyone had a council or NHS private funded version of this? Might get it as to me marking everything on a 1-10 system made me give up hope. Don't know if this would be better if anyone's tried it


Get the chimp paradox if you can. One of the best CBT books.
As used by Brendan Rodgers,
39005440-jjQ5V.jpg
These things tend to work a treat if there's nothing actually wrong with you.
cossy316/11/2019 17:42

Get the chimp paradox if you can. One of the best CBT books.


Thanks I'll have a look
joeo2000116/11/2019 17:49

As used by Brendan Rodgers, [Image]


Hmm Liverpool fan...I just might. Still see him on TV and sing Brendon Rodgers
Thanks
Someonetookmyusername16/11/2019 18:11

Hmm Liverpool fan...I just might. Still see him on TV and sing Brendon …Hmm Liverpool fan...I just might. Still see him on TV and sing Brendon Rodgers


I got it on Audible when the 3 months for 1 was on offer. I won the the league and cup and champions League within a season, admittedly it was football manager mobile, but still
Someonetookmyusername16/11/2019 17:41

Anyone had a council or NHS private funded version of this? Might get it …Anyone had a council or NHS private funded version of this? Might get it as to me marking everything on a 1-10 system made me give up hope. Don't know if this would be better if anyone's tried it


I'm having NHS CBT at the moment. They use the 1-10 scoring system to assess your symptoms and monitor your progress. If you need help I massively recommend CBT, it's been as good as SSRI meds for me
joeo2000116/11/2019 18:19

I got it on Audible when the 3 months for 1 was on offer. I won the the …I got it on Audible when the 3 months for 1 was on offer. I won the the league and cup and champions League within a season, admittedly it was football manager mobile, but still

Brilliant, love it!
_sion16/11/2019 18:27

I'm having NHS CBT at the moment. They use the 1-10 scoring system to …I'm having NHS CBT at the moment. They use the 1-10 scoring system to assess your symptoms and monitor your progress. If you need help I massively recommend CBT, it's been as good as SSRI meds for me


I just find it hard to account a number to feelings. It either is or isn't
_sion16/11/2019 18:27

I'm having NHS CBT at the moment. They use the 1-10 scoring system to …I'm having NHS CBT at the moment. They use the 1-10 scoring system to assess your symptoms and monitor your progress. If you need help I massively recommend CBT, it's been as good as SSRI meds for me


The problem with the scoring is that scores will vary, sometimes within a few hours.

Another good book is Feeling Good by David Burns. Also get its accompanying workbook.
Thanks
bozo00716/11/2019 19:19

The problem with the scoring is that scores will vary, sometimes within a …The problem with the scoring is that scores will vary, sometimes within a few hours.Another good book is Feeling Good by David Burns. Also get its accompanying workbook.


The scores are also really dependent on how you feeling at the time at the time you give them. If you are in a bad place you will score the whole past week as a bad week irrespective of how it's actually been. This is why it's only a very small part of the process. The whole process is more dependent on mood diaries, the mood/thought relationship and learning to recognise thought patterns and processes.
The Works often have cheap CBT books or I can highly recommend the excellent Stop Thinking, Start Living by Richard Carlson, and also The Worry Cure by David Leahy, or Feeling Good: New Mood Therapy by David Burns - all good cbt books and often available used for around £3 via Abe books or Amazon.
cossy316/11/2019 17:42

Get the chimp paradox if you can. One of the best CBT books.


Got it on audible, thanks for the recommendation
When i was struggling with anxiety the best thing i found was Youtube videos by a guy called David Daish. They really helped me. Also anything by Claire Weekes and there was a book called the Panic Switch also which was really useful.
Thanks Boz..
Thanks Boz
How come on the Amazon shopping app its £2,99 but using a browser to get it; the price is free?
Thank you
I'm sure CBT works for some but over the years the NHS have put me through 2 courses of CBT councilling and it just does not work, It's a band aid not a cure.
Trigger the anxiety, welcome it, let it flow right through you without resisting. Rinse. Repeat.

What you resist will persist.
Edited by: "vibz1991" 17th Nov 2019
I actually teach CBT so thought I'd weigh in.

You need a certain level of intelligence (self-awareness) for this to work and be really effective as the whole premise for it is based on the concept that it is your thoughts causing your emotions (for which there is a significant amount of evidence on).

CBT follows what's known as the ABC model : Activating event > Belief (or thought) > Consequence.

So in short, something happens (activating event), you have a thought or belief about it and this subsequently causes your emotions or behaviour (consequences).

People receiving CBT for things like anxiety, depression or negative emotions is based on the idea that for some reason, your internal thought patterns have become incredibly negative. So that internal dialogue you have with yourself that many people don't really recognise is happening (until you look out for it) has become toxic, you're feeding yourself negative thoughts about yourself, your life, the world, the situation you find yourself in and around you and just like smoking is a habitual behaviour, these thought patterns have become habitual too and 'stuck' in this type of way of thinking.

Effectively, you need to start telling yourself positive things and see the positives in every situation as well as challenge those irrational thoughts through using rational, logic, pragmatism and ultimately looking at the bigger picture.

It does work but you need to be incredibly resilient too; it changed my own life when I started applying it to myself but its not a magic bullet, you cant just think positive thoughts, you need to follow this up with action too and steps to improve your situation dependent on the problem.
mephestic17/11/2019 08:04

I actually teach CBT so thought I'd weigh in. You need a certain level of …I actually teach CBT so thought I'd weigh in. You need a certain level of intelligence (self-awareness) for this to work and be really effective as the whole premise for it is based on the concept that it is your thoughts causing your emotions (for which there is a significant amount of evidence on).CBT follows what's known as the ABC model : Activating event > Belief (or thought) > Consequence.So in short, something happens (activating event), you have a thought or belief about it and this subsequently causes your emotions or behaviour (consequences).People receiving CBT for things like anxiety, depression or negative emotions is based on the idea that for some reason, your internal thought patterns have become incredibly negative. So that internal dialogue you have with yourself that many people don't really recognise is happening (until you look out for it) has become toxic, you're feeding yourself negative thoughts about yourself, your life, the world, the situation you find yourself in and around you and just like smoking is a habitual behaviour, these thought patterns have become habitual too and 'stuck' in this type of way of thinking.Effectively, you need to start telling yourself positive things and see the positives in every situation as well as challenge those irrational thoughts through using rational, logic, pragmatism and ultimately looking at the bigger picture.It does work but you need to be incredibly resilient too; it changed my own life when I started applying it to myself but its not a magic bullet, you cant just think positive thoughts, you need to follow this up with action too and steps to improve your situation dependent on the problem.


Thank You
Thank you
Tempted. The real life CBT changed my life. Might be good to have this around.
mephestic17/11/2019 08:04

I actually teach CBT so thought I'd weigh in. You need a certain level of …I actually teach CBT so thought I'd weigh in. You need a certain level of intelligence (self-awareness) for this to work and be really effective as the whole premise for it is based on the concept that it is your thoughts causing your emotions (for which there is a significant amount of evidence on).CBT follows what's known as the ABC model : Activating event > Belief (or thought) > Consequence.So in short, something happens (activating event), you have a thought or belief about it and this subsequently causes your emotions or behaviour (consequences).People receiving CBT for things like anxiety, depression or negative emotions is based on the idea that for some reason, your internal thought patterns have become incredibly negative. So that internal dialogue you have with yourself that many people don't really recognise is happening (until you look out for it) has become toxic, you're feeding yourself negative thoughts about yourself, your life, the world, the situation you find yourself in and around you and just like smoking is a habitual behaviour, these thought patterns have become habitual too and 'stuck' in this type of way of thinking.Effectively, you need to start telling yourself positive things and see the positives in every situation as well as challenge those irrational thoughts through using rational, logic, pragmatism and ultimately looking at the bigger picture.It does work but you need to be incredibly resilient too; it changed my own life when I started applying it to myself but its not a magic bullet, you cant just think positive thoughts, you need to follow this up with action too and steps to improve your situation dependent on the problem.


Would you recommend this, or any similar, book over seeing a therapist?
Nice they HUKD are advertising this as a free Kindle in the daily deals notification. Proper clickbaity
andyhhhdx16/11/2019 22:36

When i was struggling with anxiety the best thing i found was Youtube …When i was struggling with anxiety the best thing i found was Youtube videos by a guy called David Daish. They really helped me. Also anything by Claire Weekes and there was a book called the Panic Switch also which was really useful.


Thank you... I will look into your recommendations.
myhukd123417/11/2019 09:36

Would you recommend this, or any similar, book over seeing a therapist?


If you can get a good therapist on the NHS that is nearly always going to be better than reading a book. CBT helps to retrain your mind and to overcome automatic negative thoughts. But it takes a while to sink in and you need to work at it until questioning those negative thoughts becomes second nature. I haven't had cbt, but I've read loads of CBT books, and if you have someone sitting in front of you telling you all this stuff I would imagine it would sink in more quickly.

As a couple of posters have said, CBT isn't a magic wand. You do need to be self-aware and recognise that a lot of stuff we tell ourselves isn't true - 'I'm a failure/nobody likes me/I can't cope' - and you need to be prepared to do the exercises and retrain your mind to be logical again. If you Google CBT exercises there are loads of free resources on the web. There are whole courses - I think Beating the Blues is one, and Moodgym is also free I think.
moodgym.com.au/
Boaby_wan17/11/2019 11:27

Comment deleted


Way to break the stigma around mental health issues that persists and continues to help make suicide one of the biggest killers in the UK.
CBT is complete rubbish. The NHS forced me to have it even though it wasn't relevant to me. Rating problems 1-10 based on a few set questions that may or may not be relevant to everyone? It's so ridiculous.

I struggle with Asperger's and severe anxiety yet you see, my extreme nervous symptons just happen with no reason behind them. For instance, I really want to go outside, meet people, go to coffee shops, see new things and have no fears or worries about doing so. Yet when I go out, the symptoms are so extreme I become upset, suicidal and very distressed so have to come back home.

CBT did nothing to help me and was never going to. There aren't any irrational thoughts, worries or fears for it to tackle. It's as simple as I'm a nervous wreck when I'm trying to get out and about and the symptoms affect my life so much it makes me feel low.

If the symptoms were supposedly all in my head, why am I alone, isolated and cut off from society? Even though I've been trying my best to get out and about.
Chimp paradox is great...as is 'The Happiness Trap' which is a great practical summary of ACT. Chimp/CBT is about managing/boxing the chimp, ACT is about acceptance and mindfulness. See what works best for you.

And if you want to take this further look into 'Stoicism' which is at the heart of CBT and ACT and has been around a lot longer. Try 'How to think like a Roman Emperor' by Donald Robertson which makes the links. If you want a challenge have a go at 'Happy' by Derren Brown (yeah I know!)
Edited by: "hotyoda" 17th Nov 2019
mephestic17/11/2019 08:04

I actually teach CBT so thought I'd weigh in. You need a certain level of …I actually teach CBT so thought I'd weigh in. You need a certain level of intelligence (self-awareness) for this to work and be really effective as the whole premise for it is based on the concept that it is your thoughts causing your emotions (for which there is a significant amount of evidence on).CBT follows what's known as the ABC model : Activating event > Belief (or thought) > Consequence.So in short, something happens (activating event), you have a thought or belief about it and this subsequently causes your emotions or behaviour (consequences).People receiving CBT for things like anxiety, depression or negative emotions is based on the idea that for some reason, your internal thought patterns have become incredibly negative. So that internal dialogue you have with yourself that many people don't really recognise is happening (until you look out for it) has become toxic, you're feeding yourself negative thoughts about yourself, your life, the world, the situation you find yourself in and around you and just like smoking is a habitual behaviour, these thought patterns have become habitual too and 'stuck' in this type of way of thinking.Effectively, you need to start telling yourself positive things and see the positives in every situation as well as challenge those irrational thoughts through using rational, logic, pragmatism and ultimately looking at the bigger picture.It does work but you need to be incredibly resilient too; it changed my own life when I started applying it to myself but its not a magic bullet, you cant just think positive thoughts, you need to follow this up with action too and steps to improve your situation dependent on the problem.



It's wonderful to read people are having good results with CBT, but to imply those who don't lack intelligence or self awareness - I don't agree with that.

I often get told I have great insight and awareness (too much, I'd say) but the problem with mental health services, and NHS in general, is that it's a one therapy for all system, such as CBT.

I am an individual, I have had unique experiences - I have phobias and anxieties that have festered for so long I can't remember how to unpick all of them, even if I have some knowledge when, where and why they've developed.

The support network you have, your social group, your day to day routines, all play a part, not just how you think moment to moment. It's far too simplistic to tell yourself you can think yourself well - especially if you have more serious mental health issues.

It's not meant to sound defensive and I could turn this into a huge essay but CBT didn't help me. I was especially turned off when the first appointment (which took quite a bit of effort for me to get to, not to mention the socialisation aspect) was basically a few hours with two CBT representatives telling us How great it is, It's the NHS' number one therapy blah blah - almost as if they were salesmen who'd won a contract.
mephestic17/11/2019 08:04

I actually teach CBT so thought I'd weigh in. You need a certain level of …I actually teach CBT so thought I'd weigh in. You need a certain level of intelligence (self-awareness) for this to work and be really effective as the whole premise for it is based on the concept that it is your thoughts causing your emotions (for which there is a significant amount of evidence on).CBT follows what's known as the ABC model : Activating event > Belief (or thought) > Consequence.So in short, something happens (activating event), you have a thought or belief about it and this subsequently causes your emotions or behaviour (consequences).People receiving CBT for things like anxiety, depression or negative emotions is based on the idea that for some reason, your internal thought patterns have become incredibly negative. So that internal dialogue you have with yourself that many people don't really recognise is happening (until you look out for it) has become toxic, you're feeding yourself negative thoughts about yourself, your life, the world, the situation you find yourself in and around you and just like smoking is a habitual behaviour, these thought patterns have become habitual too and 'stuck' in this type of way of thinking.Effectively, you need to start telling yourself positive things and see the positives in every situation as well as challenge those irrational thoughts through using rational, logic, pragmatism and ultimately looking at the bigger picture.It does work but you need to be incredibly resilient too; it changed my own life when I started applying it to myself but its not a magic bullet, you cant just think positive thoughts, you need to follow this up with action too and steps to improve your situation dependent on the problem.


Interesting to hear that about 'certain level of intelligence' from someone in the know because that's something that I've noticed. You do actually need to 'get it' for it to work and there's also a lot of stigma attached to what some groups write off as 'snowflake' stuff. Look at the flak schools got from certain parts of the press for introducing 'mindfulness' at primary schools.
mephestic17/11/2019 08:04

I actually teach CBT so thought I'd weigh in. You need a certain level of …I actually teach CBT so thought I'd weigh in. You need a certain level of intelligence (self-awareness) for this to work and be really effective as the whole premise for it is based on the concept that it is your thoughts causing your emotions (for which there is a significant amount of evidence on).CBT follows what's known as the ABC model : Activating event > Belief (or thought) > Consequence.So in short, something happens (activating event), you have a thought or belief about it and this subsequently causes your emotions or behaviour (consequences).People receiving CBT for things like anxiety, depression or negative emotions is based on the idea that for some reason, your internal thought patterns have become incredibly negative. So that internal dialogue you have with yourself that many people don't really recognise is happening (until you look out for it) has become toxic, you're feeding yourself negative thoughts about yourself, your life, the world, the situation you find yourself in and around you and just like smoking is a habitual behaviour, these thought patterns have become habitual too and 'stuck' in this type of way of thinking.Effectively, you need to start telling yourself positive things and see the positives in every situation as well as challenge those irrational thoughts through using rational, logic, pragmatism and ultimately looking at the bigger picture.It does work but you need to be incredibly resilient too; it changed my own life when I started applying it to myself but its not a magic bullet, you cant just think positive thoughts, you need to follow this up with action too and steps to improve your situation dependent on the problem.


Why can't Doc Martin combat his blood phobia then....rational thinking does not always work
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