Cold Pressed Extra Virgin RAPESEED OIL 500ml £1.99 @ Lidl
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Cold Pressed Extra Virgin RAPESEED OIL 500ml £1.99 @ Lidl

44
Found 9th Jul 2015
I was in Lidl for a browse and found the oil, very cheap plus it is locally made in Yorkshire. So seems a good deal guys

44 Comments

Is this is good for general frying?

Original Poster

Yes you can use it for frying, stuff comes out less greasy

Banned

saw this discussed in the paper

completely different to & better than average rapeseed oil

hotter burning temperature than olive oil (no nasties/ carcinogenics)

meant to taste good cold on salads

Original Poster

Yes my sister uses this, she is very particular trust me guys this stuff is good.

Original Poster

Plus it is produced locally and fresher

Yes it's excellent oil. Can get in bulk subscribe and save amazon too

Original Poster

I will upload receipt and pic of bottle later guys, phone needs charged

Same price at Aldi too. Really nice stuff, tastes amazing when roasting potatoes

Banned

Rapeseed oil is exceptionally good, but the Yorkshire factor puts me off this particular one

WillieGallimore

Rapeseed oil is exceptionally good, but the Yorkshire factor puts me off … Rapeseed oil is exceptionally good, but the Yorkshire factor puts me off this particular one



Why?

The problem with rapeseed oil is that the fats in it aren't stable, so they go rancid in the body, oxidising and producing free radicals. Even worse if cooked.

That's my understanding anyway and why we avoid vegetable oils for cooking.

Interested to hear other opinions on this though.

It is odd to see the classification of olives pressed for oil i.e extra virgin being applied to oilseed rape. I wonder if Yorkshire will apply to the EU for "protected designation of origin" for their local rape seed oil. It would be funny if they did.

OB1

The problem with rapeseed oil is that the fats in it aren't stable, so … The problem with rapeseed oil is that the fats in it aren't stable, so they go rancid in the body, oxidising and producing free radicals. Even worse if cooked. That's my understanding anyway and why we avoid vegetable oils for cooking. Interested to hear other opinions on this though.


Coconut oil?

OB1

The problem with rapeseed oil is that the fats in it aren't stable, so … The problem with rapeseed oil is that the fats in it aren't stable, so they go rancid in the body, oxidising and producing free radicals. Even worse if cooked. That's my understanding anyway and why we avoid vegetable oils for cooking. Interested to hear other opinions on this though.



What have you been reading? oO

Rapeseed oil has one of the highest smoke points so it's much better for high temperature cooking than most other oils. All fats are made up of the same basic constituents and are digested in pretty much all the same way. You say it will go rancid in your body and produce free radicals but you might not be aware that rapeseed is a source of vitamin E, an antioxidant. I've never heard of an oil going rancid in the body and the free radical thing is to do with cooking above smoke points again.
Edited by: "yrreb88" 12th Jul 2015

Banned

OB1

The problem with rapeseed oil is that the fats in it aren't stable, so … The problem with rapeseed oil is that the fats in it aren't stable, so they go rancid in the body, oxidising and producing free radicals. Even worse if cooked. That's my understanding anyway and why we avoid vegetable oils for cooking. Interested to hear other opinions on this though.


Lol!! The fats go rancid in the body?!! Where did you study anatomy, ancient Egypt?

biggysilly

I wonder if Yorkshire will apply to the EU for "protected designation … I wonder if Yorkshire will apply to the EU for "protected designation of origin" for their local rape seed oil. It would be funny if they did.



Extra virgin is the process, isn't it? And though we associate it with olive oil, can't the process be just as easily used for production of rapeseed oil? As for applying for PDO at some point? Why not? Maybe the Yorkshire soil makes their rapeseed oil taste better. It's no dafter a notion than the French wittering on about the effects of terroir.

biggysilly

It is odd to see the classification of olives pressed for oil i.e extra … It is odd to see the classification of olives pressed for oil i.e extra virgin being applied to oilseed rape. I wonder if Yorkshire will apply to the EU for "protected designation of origin" for their local rape seed oil. It would be funny if they did.



Sutcliffe in bold???

This thread is becoming very surreal!!!

Banned

MaximusRo

Coconut oil?



I use this pretty much exclusively now

OB1

The problem with rapeseed oil is that the fats in it aren't stable, so … The problem with rapeseed oil is that the fats in it aren't stable, so they go rancid in the body, oxidising and producing free radicals.



http://www.guilfest.co.uk/2010/storage/The%20Free%20Radicals_What%20the%20Folk.jpg

Wow marketing hype for common or garden rapeseed oil... what next, water in bottles??

this stuff is great, you can bake, fry and use for dressings, personally prefer the taste to extra virgin olive oil. Makes lovely bread. Cooking with vegetable oil is safe, just don't reuse it too much when frying or burn it as thats when it becomes carcinogenic. Dont fry with Extra Virgin Olive oil, smoke point is too low and will smoke loads. You can use Pomace for frying if you prefer the properties of olive oil, this has a higher smoke point but beware of blended products.

OttovonPrimark

Extra virgin is the process, isn't it? And though we associate it with … Extra virgin is the process, isn't it? And though we associate it with olive oil, can't the process be just as easily used for production of rapeseed oil? As for applying for PDO at some point? Why not? Maybe the Yorkshire soil makes their rapeseed oil taste better. It's no dafter a notion than the French wittering on about the effects of terroir.



Damned terroiristes !

Read somewhere its the same as vegetable oil.....

bordonman

Wow marketing hype for common or garden rapeseed oil... what next, water … Wow marketing hype for common or garden rapeseed oil... what next, water in bottles??




Yup, someone who gets it, Oilseed rape will grow on virtual scrubland. IF folk get out of the cities they will see great swathes of it in bloom a great one for upping the pollen count massively.

All this "cold pressed" malarkey is marketing PR , it used to be the poor man's oil, nowt wrong with it, but it clearly chose to up it's marketing & perceived value as a cash crop, ...& it worked with many dumbed down, non food aware, fashionista foodies.

stock in trade "vegetable oil" since the year dot of the EEC as was.

The trouble with rape seed oil is erucic acid, this is the latest hydrogenated oil scandal waiting to happen.

I wouldn't touch the stuff.

A lot of vegetable oils are rapeseed, just read the bottle, it is better than olive oil for cooking. Surely it comes down to taste, if you like to pay more because it taste nice, then that's it. Try it..

Use animal fats instead

Original Poster

I agree with Dar, animal fats are good. I am confused, surely the rape seed oil in veg oil is of a low quality? Because it tastes extremely different to this stuff and yes it is perfect for roasting.
Edited by: "boothinnit" 12th Jul 2015

alexfn

The trouble with rape seed oil is erucic acid, this is the latest … The trouble with rape seed oil is erucic acid, this is the latest hydrogenated oil scandal waiting to happen. I wouldn't touch the stuff.



Really? Not everything you read on the internet is true.

"There's a lot of negative info on the web about rapeseed (canola) oil. Doesn't rapeseed oil contain toxic erucic acid? Is it safe to eat?

Yes, it is safe. Today, levels of erucic acid in foods are strictly controlled and regulated - so there is no risk of any harm to health.

Erucic acid is naturally found in some oils. There have been no confirmed reports of erucic acid causing health problems in humans, however, findings from animal and laboratory studies suggest that regular consumption of high levels of erucic acid may be a risk to heart health. As such, during the seventies and eighties, the levels of erucic acids in food were addressed and reduced using bredding techniques - and remain strictly controlled and regulated for food safety today."

shaysmum

Read somewhere its the same as vegetable oil.....



Yeah if you buy generic vegetable, and check the label, it's usually rapeseed.

alexfn

The trouble with rape seed oil is erucic acid, this is the latest … The trouble with rape seed oil is erucic acid, this is the latest hydrogenated oil scandal waiting to happen. I wouldn't touch the stuff.

shaysmum

Read somewhere its the same as vegetable oil.....



Hydrogenated oil speads were recommended for years, even by doctors as a healthy alternative.. How did that work out? Eurcic acid is known to be toxic to humans. Do more research than Wikipedia.

alexfn

Hydrogenated oil speads were recommended for years, even by doctors as a … Hydrogenated oil speads were recommended for years, even by doctors as a healthy alternative.. How did that work out? Eurcic acid is known to be toxic to humans. Do more research than Wikipedia.



what would you suggest? www.whattheyainttellingyou!!!!!!.com? the-fruit-cakes-consideration.com?

You can't beat chips cooked in lard

alexfn

Hydrogenated oil speads were recommended for years, even by doctors as a … Hydrogenated oil speads were recommended for years, even by doctors as a healthy alternative.. How did that work out? Eurcic acid is known to be toxic to humans. Do more research than Wikipedia.



Sorry but you need references for those claims. You say latest scandal but eurcic acid has never been proven to be specifically toxic in humans and regardless the levels in rapeseed are much lower than 40 years ago which do not warrent concern.

How did what work out? The current average levels of trans fat consumption are below the maximum recommended daily intake and you'll struggle to get much if any trans fat in current products. Vegetable spreads and butter are mostly fat, it's just different proportions of the types. You shouldn't avoid vegetable spreads simply because years ago they contained trans fat.




Aldi has been selling cold-pressed (another way of saying extra-virgin) British rapeseed oil for many months and for the same price.

adrianjowitt

You can't beat chips cooked in lard



Lard in my experience has an unpleasant odour but beef dripping is much more neutral and is what we have in our deep fat fryer - produces excellent chips (even though I don't eat them as I'm dedicated to low-carbing, though some occasional quality control testing is allowed :)).

yrreb88

Sorry but you need references for those claims. You say latest scandal … Sorry but you need references for those claims. You say latest scandal but eurcic acid has never been proven to be specifically toxic in humans and regardless the levels in rapeseed are much lower than 40 years ago which do not warrent concern. How did what work out? The current average levels of trans fat consumption are below the maximum recommended daily intake and you'll struggle to get much if any trans fat in current products. Vegetable spreads and butter are mostly fat, it's just different proportions of the types. You shouldn't avoid vegetable spreads simply because years ago they contained trans fat.




You flat out ignored my point, for years hydrogenated oil spreads were considered the healthy option and we all know how that turned out. They are absolutely terrible for you. Erucic acid is already known to be terrible for you hence the fact that there are laws around how much can be in a product. 2% in the US 5% in the EU.

5% of your oil is toxic. Fill your boots with it for all i care.. I didn't get sucked in with hydrogenated oil and im dodging this one too. Stick to what is proven. That means not filling your body with the latest cash crop
Edited by: "alexfn" 13th Jul 2015

alexfn

You flat out ignored my point, for years hydrogenated oil spreads were … You flat out ignored my point, for years hydrogenated oil spreads were considered the healthy option and we all know how that turned out. They are absolutely terrible for you. Erucic acid is already known to be terrible for you hence the fact that there are laws around how much can be in a product. 2% in the US 5% in the EU. 5% of your oil is toxic. Fill your boots with it for all i care.. I didn't get sucked in with hydrogenated oil and im dodging this one too. Stick to what is proven. That means not filling your body with the latest cash crop



British cold-pressed rapeseed oil typically contains less than 0.5% erucic acid. Some other myths are busted here:

uk.lifestyle.yahoo.com/rap…tml

alexfn

You flat out ignored my point, for years hydrogenated oil spreads were … You flat out ignored my point, for years hydrogenated oil spreads were considered the healthy option and we all know how that turned out. They are absolutely terrible for you. Erucic acid is already known to be terrible for you hence the fact that there are laws around how much can be in a product. 2% in the US 5% in the EU. 5% of your oil is toxic. Fill your boots with it for all i care.. I didn't get sucked in with hydrogenated oil and im dodging this one too. Stick to what is proven. That means not filling your body with the latest cash crop


And you're ignoring all my points too because you've not provided a single reference to your claims. I did address that point somewhat, I asked what reason is there to avoid something that was potentially a problem decades ago. I also asked for more information, how did this advice turn/work out? Was consuming hydrogenated fats official advice and recommended by everyone? Why is it bad exactly, trans fat, eurcic acid content etc?

You've got to realise that although the alternatives used to have more trans fat in, they also had more poly and monounsaturated fats and less saturated fats than typical sources like butter. The total trans and sat fat content is more important to consider in terms of health. The mono and polyunsaturated fat contents are associated with health benefits and cardio-protective effects. As trans fat levels are now either zero or minimal, your point about avoiding them is irrelevant.

In terms of "toxicity" because of eurcic acid, you completely misunderstand the science. You might not have heard the phrase the dose makes the poison. High levels are associated with problems in animals and has never been established in humans. As a precaution, it was the 70s, governments moved away from using rapeseed until these levels were reduced to a fraction by cross breeding. There is nothing "toxic" about it now but if you are concerned you could avoid broccoli, kale, cabbage, cauliflower, mustard and Brussels sprouts too. 5% of the oil is toxic is a ridiculous statement.

Which "cash crop" should we be filling our bodies with? All product make money after all.
Edited by: "yrreb88" 13th Jul 2015

erjin999

Is this is good for general frying?



Just use cheap oil for frying, cold pressed rapeseed oil is more like olive oil and its a waste such an oil for frying as you'll loose all of the flavour character in the oil. Use this stuff for salad dressing and drisling over finished dishes, also great for dipping bread into with some balsamic
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