Compass Control men's and Contour women's hybrid bikes £225 (were £299, RRP £400) at Go Outdoors.  Free delivery or collect in store.
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Compass Control men's and Contour women's hybrid bikes £225 (were £299, RRP £400) at Go Outdoors. Free delivery or collect in store.

19
Expires on 24/04/2018Found 9th AprEdited by:"Besford"
Just spotted this hybrid bike deal on the Go Outdoors website. Looks like a great spec for the reduced price (RRP £400 is just flying a kite but £299 seems very believable).

Equivalent women's frame is Compass Contour:
gooutdoors.co.uk/com…927

Personally I'd prefer it without the suspension to save weight but depending on your useage it could be a benefit. Alloy frame, disc brakes and 21 speed Shimano gearing with E-Z fire shifters.

17",19" and 21" men's frames and 15" and 17" women's frames available.

Go Outdoors seem to have a decent reputation for bikes. Three good reviews showing.

Worth a look if you're searchinging for a hybrid around this price I think.

Deal ends 24 April.
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Carrera Subway a much better bike which does come down to close to this price (£230-240) quite often. I would hold out for that.

Low end suspension and a freewheel based drivetrain limits the strength and reliability of this bike. They have fitted a Altus derailleur to make you think the drivetrain is more high end but it isn't, the freewheel is the same as found on sub £100 bikes, infact the 6 speed shimano freewheel is probably better than the 7 speed overall slightly as the gears aren't so tightly packed and works better with a bit of freewheel wobble (threads on the freewheel and rear hub not being perfectly machined so the freewheel moves in and out slightly as you ride (very common)).

The only good thing here is you can replace the rear wheel with a freehub based rear wheel and fit a 7 speed cassette and nothing else needs to be changed and that is a minimum probably of £40 extra.

Shame they went with front shocks. If they had fitted rigid front forks they probably could have afforded to use a freehub on the rear with a 7 speed cassette and made a much better bike for the same price. The trouble is front shocks are appealing to a lot of people buying despite the fact most of the time they should be avoiding them.

Just bear in mind the reason many bikes are thrown out is the suspension fails a few years after buying. Often seals and replacement parts aren't available or expensive and new suspension isn't viable so people scrap the bike. A comfortable saddle, deep tyres at the right pressure can provide a lot of comfort without the liability of suspension. A steel frame can help too, often being more springy than aluminium and dulling the sensation of hitting potholes etc.

Riverside 120 is still available for £130 from Decathlon. A fully rigid hybrid but with a decent 8 speed freehub based drivetrain. The bike has a more limited weight capacity (100kg minus bike, accessories, clothes, luggage) so effectively a rider limit of about 80-85kg but if you fall into that camp great value plus also only the medium size frame is available but that bike should be far lower maintenance than this Compass bike especially over the long term. Compass bikes normally have a 100kg weight capacity just for the rider and Carrera 120kg just for the rider with a total weight capacity of 160kg (the certification recommendation). So the heavier the rider the more sense to go the Carrera Subway route which is very strong and can take a lot of abuse.


decathlon.co.uk/riv…tml
19 Comments
Looks good for the money.
Cheers mate. Went for the ladies model for the Mrs. Don't know much about bikes, but from reading similar threads I noticed this one has mechanical disc breaks!
Good for the money, for 40 quid more for a Crossfire II at Halfords you can ditch the outdated freewheel and get an 8 speed cassette on the back though.
drbiggles2 h, 18 m ago

Good for the money, for 40 quid more for a Crossfire II at Halfords you …Good for the money, for 40 quid more for a Crossfire II at Halfords you can ditch the outdated freewheel and get an 8 speed cassette on the back though.


Don't understand, both this bike and crossfire 2 look like they got the same cassette at the back?
They forgot the pedals.
Dont expect too much for 225, but if they are branded should be ok
htslough1 h, 16 m ago

Don't understand, both this bike and crossfire 2 look like they got the …Don't understand, both this bike and crossfire 2 look like they got the same cassette at the back?


Crossfire 2 has an 8 speed cassette, whereas this bike looks to use a 7 speed freewheel. They're generally more expensive to replace when worn and harsher on the rear axle
thetwistedblue4 h, 40 m ago

Cheers mate. Went for the ladies model for the Mrs. Don't know much about …Cheers mate. Went for the ladies model for the Mrs. Don't know much about bikes, but from reading similar threads I noticed this one has mechanical disc breaks!


Which you've got to keep adjusting yourself :-(
Carrera Subway a much better bike which does come down to close to this price (£230-240) quite often. I would hold out for that.

Low end suspension and a freewheel based drivetrain limits the strength and reliability of this bike. They have fitted a Altus derailleur to make you think the drivetrain is more high end but it isn't, the freewheel is the same as found on sub £100 bikes, infact the 6 speed shimano freewheel is probably better than the 7 speed overall slightly as the gears aren't so tightly packed and works better with a bit of freewheel wobble (threads on the freewheel and rear hub not being perfectly machined so the freewheel moves in and out slightly as you ride (very common)).

The only good thing here is you can replace the rear wheel with a freehub based rear wheel and fit a 7 speed cassette and nothing else needs to be changed and that is a minimum probably of £40 extra.

Shame they went with front shocks. If they had fitted rigid front forks they probably could have afforded to use a freehub on the rear with a 7 speed cassette and made a much better bike for the same price. The trouble is front shocks are appealing to a lot of people buying despite the fact most of the time they should be avoiding them.

Just bear in mind the reason many bikes are thrown out is the suspension fails a few years after buying. Often seals and replacement parts aren't available or expensive and new suspension isn't viable so people scrap the bike. A comfortable saddle, deep tyres at the right pressure can provide a lot of comfort without the liability of suspension. A steel frame can help too, often being more springy than aluminium and dulling the sensation of hitting potholes etc.

Riverside 120 is still available for £130 from Decathlon. A fully rigid hybrid but with a decent 8 speed freehub based drivetrain. The bike has a more limited weight capacity (100kg minus bike, accessories, clothes, luggage) so effectively a rider limit of about 80-85kg but if you fall into that camp great value plus also only the medium size frame is available but that bike should be far lower maintenance than this Compass bike especially over the long term. Compass bikes normally have a 100kg weight capacity just for the rider and Carrera 120kg just for the rider with a total weight capacity of 160kg (the certification recommendation). So the heavier the rider the more sense to go the Carrera Subway route which is very strong and can take a lot of abuse.


decathlon.co.uk/riv…tml
bonzobanana57 m ago

Carrera Subway a much better bike which does come down to close to this …Carrera Subway a much better bike which does come down to close to this price (£230-240) quite often. I would hold out for that.Low end suspension and a freewheel based drivetrain limits the strength and reliability of this bike. They have fitted a Altus derailleur to make you think the drivetrain is more high end but it isn't, the freewheel is the same as found on sub £100 bikes, infact the 6 speed shimano freewheel is probably better than the 7 speed overall slightly as the gears aren't so tightly packed and works better with a bit of freewheel wobble (threads on the freewheel and rear hub not being perfectly machined so the freewheel moves in and out slightly as you ride (very common)).The only good thing here is you can replace the rear wheel with a freehub based rear wheel and fit a 7 speed cassette and nothing else needs to be changed and that is a minimum probably of £40 extra. Shame they went with front shocks. If they had fitted rigid front forks they probably could have afforded to use a freehub on the rear with a 7 speed cassette and made a much better bike for the same price. The trouble is front shocks are appealing to a lot of people buying despite the fact most of the time they should be avoiding them.Just bear in mind the reason many bikes are thrown out is the suspension fails a few years after buying. Often seals and replacement parts aren't available or expensive and new suspension isn't viable so people scrap the bike. A comfortable saddle, deep tyres at the right pressure can provide a lot of comfort without the liability of suspension. A steel frame can help too, often being more springy than aluminium and dulling the sensation of hitting potholes etc.Riverside 120 is still available for £130 from Decathlon. A fully rigid hybrid but with a decent 8 speed freehub based drivetrain. The bike has a more limited weight capacity (100kg minus bike, accessories, clothes, luggage) so effectively a rider limit of about 80-85kg but if you fall into that camp great value plus also only the medium size frame is available but that bike should be far lower maintenance than this Compass bike especially over the long term. Compass bikes normally have a 100kg weight capacity just for the rider and Carrera 120kg just for the rider with a total weight capacity of 160kg (the certification recommendation). So the heavier the rider the more sense to go the Carrera Subway route which is very strong and can take a lot of abuse.https://www.decathlon.co.uk/riverside-120-hybrid-bike-id_8379017.html


Thanks for posting. Very useful post and gives me some basic info on these.
Original Poster
bonzobanana10th Apr

.... The trouble is front shocks are appealing to a lot of people buying ….... The trouble is front shocks are appealing to a lot of people buying despite the fact most of the time they should be avoiding them....


So, so true - unfortunately.
What is an outdated freewheel? Something that worked fine for many years that has now been replaced with something slightly better?
@trevcjohnson wobbly wheels
Complete bike noob here. Is there anything fundamentally different between men's bikes and women's, apart from perhaps the colour?
Original Poster
r_holmes2220th Apr

Complete bike noob here. Is there anything fundamentally different between …Complete bike noob here. Is there anything fundamentally different between men's bikes and women's, apart from perhaps the colour?


Some womens' bikes have a lower crossbar and most will have different geometry (seat to bars distance, etc.). In reality these are only very approximate 'adaptations' to 'typical' male and female physiology. In fact a female frame may be the best fit for a particular male rider and vice versa. Whenever possible it's best to try a bike for 'fit' as it can make a big difference to comfort and performance. Bike retailers often quote best frame sizes for different heights - in the real world leg length is at least as important: people of the same height can have very different leg lengths.

If you go to a decent bike shop they should be able to advise.
Edited by: "Besford" 21st Apr
As said before, freehub is outdated and a horrible design. Bottom bracket will be the square taper which once again, is a poor design.

The newer designs are more reliable, lighter and stiffer which makes cycling a lot easier.

As one of the other users have said, suspension forks are useless too. I built my own hybrid bike using Suntour Epicon air forks (one of the top end set of forks you can get) and even then, have those locked off about 80% of the time and the rest of the time... I don't really need them for road / light XC use.

Wish I just went with a carbon fibre forks and saved weight and money!

To new cyclists, spend a bit more money and gain a lot more enjoyment
dose it come with pedals 🙃
Davpc20th Apr

@trevcjohnson wobbly wheels



Struggling with this, is this something new, I have never personally experienced wobbly wheels on a bike. I have giant defy 0 (2015) road bike and some sort of cheapish alloy MTB think I've had for about 25 years.
Original Poster
IIT0PDAWGII_20th Apr

dose it come with pedals 🙃


Says 'platform pedals' in the spec - so yes.
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