257°
EXPIRED
Compass norther folding bike 6 speed, was £169 now £125 with free delivery or c&c @ go outdoors
Compass norther folding bike 6 speed, was £169 now £125 with free delivery or c&c @ go outdoors

Compass norther folding bike 6 speed, was £169 now £125 with free delivery or c&c @ go outdoors

Buy forBuy forBuy for£125
GETGet dealVisit site and get deal
OK it's not the lightest at 16kg but it does have a stronger steel frame that should last longer than aluminium frames which eventually suffer fatigue. Comes with a rack and mudguards so will make a good little commute to the shops bike.

Top comments

I prefer steel myself because I'm a heavy rider but aluminium only really suffers from fatigue after shocks so that could be a mountain bike used off road, or a small drop like cycling off a pavement edge or of course a very heavy rider. For those normal to light in weight who simply use an aluminium framed bike on the road such a frame could last multiple lifetimes.

Steel folding bikes can be weak though. I noticed the Argos one's only go up to 75kg mostly which is very low. I've seen a model on ebay as low as 65kg. There is no information as far as I can tell what the weight capacity of this bike is.

I think the Oslo Explorer is one of the best deals for folding bikes currently. It has a weight capacity of 115kg, some decent components although broadly similar to this bike and only £4 more at £129 delivered. Choice of colours too plus half a kilo lighter. More importantly height adjustable handlebars which are not only important to creating a good fit for the rider but when you fold the bike it makes it easier to fold the handlebars down too. I'd definitely pay the extra for the Oslo. The one thing that makes me think the compass might have a good weight capacity as well is the high spoke count on the wheels.

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0649/1945/products/Oslo-Black_Main_2048x2048.jpg?v=1411732317

https://bicycles4u.com/collections/folding-bikes/products/oslo-explorer

http://defd230db96761500ca7-61c6d5aeae250d28854ed3e240a16b15.r17.cf3.rackcdn.com/Products/35572-180614151218667776292.jpg

This is the Argos bike that only has a 80kg weight capacity (4kg less than the average male weight in uk) and looks very similar to the Compass and still has the high spoke count, so if there is a weakness its likely in the frame.
http://media.4rgos.it/i/Argos/6164263_R_Z001?$Web$&w=920&h=662



Edited by: "bonzobanana" 17th May
30 Comments

Added bonus of a steel frame is that you can fit an electric motor and it probably won't bend everything out of whack. I'm looking to do that with mine since there are some hills in my commute.

Folding bike?Very heavy at 16kg

Original Poster

linhang90

Folding bike?Very heavy at 16kg


It's not the lightest folder but if you don't have to carry it much I doubt you will notice, you could try riding it in just your underpants if your that keen to save weight.

I prefer steel myself because I'm a heavy rider but aluminium only really suffers from fatigue after shocks so that could be a mountain bike used off road, or a small drop like cycling off a pavement edge or of course a very heavy rider. For those normal to light in weight who simply use an aluminium framed bike on the road such a frame could last multiple lifetimes.

Steel folding bikes can be weak though. I noticed the Argos one's only go up to 75kg mostly which is very low. I've seen a model on ebay as low as 65kg. There is no information as far as I can tell what the weight capacity of this bike is.

I think the Oslo Explorer is one of the best deals for folding bikes currently. It has a weight capacity of 115kg, some decent components although broadly similar to this bike and only £4 more at £129 delivered. Choice of colours too plus half a kilo lighter. More importantly height adjustable handlebars which are not only important to creating a good fit for the rider but when you fold the bike it makes it easier to fold the handlebars down too. I'd definitely pay the extra for the Oslo. The one thing that makes me think the compass might have a good weight capacity as well is the high spoke count on the wheels.

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0649/1945/products/Oslo-Black_Main_2048x2048.jpg?v=1411732317

https://bicycles4u.com/collections/folding-bikes/products/oslo-explorer

http://defd230db96761500ca7-61c6d5aeae250d28854ed3e240a16b15.r17.cf3.rackcdn.com/Products/35572-180614151218667776292.jpg

This is the Argos bike that only has a 80kg weight capacity (4kg less than the average male weight in uk) and looks very similar to the Compass and still has the high spoke count, so if there is a weakness its likely in the frame.
http://media.4rgos.it/i/Argos/6164263_R_Z001?$Web$&w=920&h=662



Edited by: "bonzobanana" 17th May

*****me goes to post a **** tv deal shouting at people for not voting hot saying "if u dont watch tv much its still a good deal"*****. Lol nvm this bike being the lightest,its the heaviest i've seen for this size.. that being said i still voted hot for the effort u made.

Lol...When u post a deal and be rude at people for simply commenting

CampGareth

Added bonus of a steel frame is that you can fit an electric motor and it … Added bonus of a steel frame is that you can fit an electric motor and it probably won't bend everything out of whack. I'm looking to do that with mine since there are some hills in my commute.



​most electric bikes sold in the UK are aluminum you dont need to have a steel frame... though there are other benefits of steel.

JJ69

​most electric bikes sold in the UK are aluminum you dont need to have a s … ​most electric bikes sold in the UK are aluminum you dont need to have a steel frame... though there are other benefits of steel.



​Can't keep your spare fridge magnets on an aluminium bike.

linhang90

*****me goes to post a **** tv deal shouting at people for not voting hot … *****me goes to post a **** tv deal shouting at people for not voting hot saying "if u dont watch tv much its still a good deal"*****. Lol nvm this bike being the lightest,its the heaviest i've seen for this size.. that being said i still voted hot for the effort u made. Lol...When u post a deal and be rude at people for simply commenting



You see these comments quite a lot but really most of the steel folding bikes are a similar weight and the aluminium models only half a kilo to a kilo lighter. Often the issue is some supplier's fit rear racks, kick stands, adjustable height handlebars, chain guards etc and add weight. To my mind this is brilliant you get those accessories thrown in which might cost £40-50 extra if you wanted them added and you always have the option of removing them to lower weight if you want to, even selling on what you don't need, racks cost about £15 new. Some of the folders have quite robust steel long mudguards, other's have flimsy plastic mudguards which break easily. 16kg is an approximate figure its probably 15kg something in weight and if you want it sub 15kg or even possibly sub 14kg just remove as much as you can that you don't need. Some of the steel folding bikes that have very low rider weight limits compared to those with high rider weight limits only seem to vary by about a third of a kilo which I personally don't think is a big deal. I'd rather have the stronger frame.

It's probably people's obsession with bike weights that caused Argos to start stocking low weight capacity bikes which really are quite dangerous because these weaker bikes often weigh a little less than similar competing bikes and probably save money logistically too. I suspect many who ride them will be over the 75/80kg limit they have on these bikes. I think the lycra brigade and so called bike experts are making bikes far more exclusive by driving bike weights down meaning many people can't safely ride bikes because of lower weight capacities.

CampGareth

Added bonus of a steel frame is that you can fit an electric motor and it … Added bonus of a steel frame is that you can fit an electric motor and it probably won't bend everything out of whack. I'm looking to do that with mine since there are some hills in my commute.


how do you do that?

"commute to the shops"

Well that's not what commuting is, unless you work in a shop.

16kg? That's crazily heavy. I can't get past that. Although credit to GO for their description,
"Due to the weight it’s probably not a bike to be used daily, but would be ideal for some extra freedom on camping/caravanning trips."

If I were desperate to spend as little as possible on a folding bike for the aforementioned use (hidden away in a caravan to save using a car to pop to the shops etc) I'd probably look at this one at 13kg:
decathlon.co.uk/hop…tml
Edited by: "tenohfive" 17th May

CampGareth

Added bonus of a steel frame is that you can fit an electric motor and it … Added bonus of a steel frame is that you can fit an electric motor and it probably won't bend everything out of whack. I'm looking to do that with mine since there are some hills in my commute.



If you do i can highly recommend the bafang bbs02 48v 750w motor. Pair it up with a 30q battery to get best from it. Really simple to fit and easy to program to kick out 1500w, around Belper I find cars get in my way. Peddle nice and easy and I get 25-30mph, some effort 35mph+.
Forget front hub based motors if you're wanting to zip up hills, they're rubbish on anything but flats.
Edited by: "jaydeeuk1" 17th May

On a lighter note I've never seen anyone look anything other than ridiculous riding these! Just add hi vis waistcoat over suit and trouser clips to complete the look.

I don't see the steel frame as much of a bonus. Cheap steel like what will be used here rusts very easily and aluminium frames take years to fatigue, far longer than the components on a £125 bike are going to last.

This argument only really applies to better quality steels like the stuff from Reynolds. This frame will just be basic hi-tensile steel.

Decent enough for chugging around on though.

tenohfive

16kg? That's crazily heavy. I can't get past that. Although credit to GO … 16kg? That's crazily heavy. I can't get past that. Although credit to GO for their description,"Due to the weight it’s probably not a bike to be used daily, but would be ideal for some extra freedom on camping/caravanning trips."If I were desperate to spend as little as possible on a folding bike for the aforementioned use (hidden away in a caravan to save using a car to pop to the shops etc) I'd probably look at this one at 13kg:https://www.decathlon.co.uk/hoptown-300-folding-bike-grey-id_8352595.html



The geared version of the same bike is 14.35kg not far off the 15.5kg approx of bikes fitted with rack and kickstand which are removable.

https://www.decathlon.co.uk/media/835/8352596/big_1d91f30430f74cb0bdc829c39ea208a6.jpg

The geared version is £179 has a non Shimano low end derailleur, no handlebar height adjustment (except handlebar rotation) and look how exposed the saddle tube is to get anywhere near the handlebar height. It looks like a half-assed design just to have something different to sell and lets not forget Decathlon's history of designing their own frames in the far east. It will look seriously weird if you are short with the handlebar height fixed so high. Also looks like it would easily develop saddle movement with so little of the saddle tube in the frame.

http://www.bike-eu.com/laws-regulations/nieuws/2017/3/decathlon-recalls-2012-2016-e-bikes-10129228

There are many great value Decathlon bikes but surely those 2 hoptown models aren't included in that list.
Their previous range of entry level folding models were much better but they looked very generic chinese bikes which I guess why Decathlon created their own unique framed models to replace them.

santahul

I don't see the steel frame as much of a bonus. Cheap steel like what … I don't see the steel frame as much of a bonus. Cheap steel like what will be used here rusts very easily and aluminium frames take years to fatigue, far longer than the components on a £125 bike are going to last.This argument only really applies to better quality steels like the stuff from Reynolds. This frame will just be basic hi-tensile steel.Decent enough for chugging around on though.



A lot of folding bikes are using high tensile steel including Bike Friday, Bromptons and a few others at the high end. People are still riding Raleigh Twenty's from the late sixties and I have my doubts whether aluminium frames will last as long especially with aluminium framed folding bikes being the most prone to problems today. You've only got to google folding bike frame failure to see the main hits are Dahon, Tern, Birdy and other aluminium bikes. It might be due to the extra stresses at the hinge thinking about it that makes folding bike's using aluminium frames more prone to frame issues than conventional bikes.

google.co.uk/sea…ure

Sorry POWYSWALES but this is another piece of heavy junk like the other folder you posted recently. You will not get a decent folder new for under £300. The only thing this will do well is attract HUKD votes because members seem to rate price above value. Good on you for posting but anyone considering buying needs to recognise the reality of these things.

Original Poster

tenohfive

16kg? That's crazily heavy. I can't get past that. Although credit to GO … 16kg? That's crazily heavy. I can't get past that. Although credit to GO for their description,"Due to the weight it’s probably not a bike to be used daily, but would be ideal for some extra freedom on camping/caravanning trips."If I were desperate to spend as little as possible on a folding bike for the aforementioned use (hidden away in a caravan to save using a car to pop to the shops etc) I'd probably look at this one at 13kg:https://www.decathlon.co.uk/hoptown-300-folding-bike-grey-id_8352595.html


Have just purchased one myself, really like the bike but it has an annoying clicking sound when peddling.

https://s17.postimg.org/nayxf7pz3/IMG_20170517_210115.jpghow to take a screen shot

Edited by: "POWYSWALES" 17th May

Original Poster

Can anyone help diagnose clicking noise on my hoptown 300 hotukdeals.com/mis…934

POWYSWALES

Can anyone help diagnose clicking noise on my hoptown 300 … Can anyone help diagnose clicking noise on my hoptown 300 http://www.hotukdeals.com/misc/can-anyone-help-diagnose-clicking-noise-new-b-twin-hoptown-300-folding-bike-2693934


Very first review on the Decathlon site for this Bike:
" ...The crank is very clunky and makes a constant clicking sound as the housing is made form a cheap plastic..."

I'm sorry but I told you so when you posted it. Decathlon are good and will sort it but the bike is made of cheap components (how else would they keep the price so low?) so you'll keep having problems.

Sometimes cheapest isn't best value - sorry!

Original Poster

Besford

Very first review on the Decathlon site for this Bike:" ...The crank is … Very first review on the Decathlon site for this Bike:" ...The crank is very clunky and makes a constant clicking sound as the housing is made form a cheap plastic..."I'm sorry but I told you so when you posted it. Decathlon are good and will sort it but the bike is made of cheap components (how else would they keep the price so low?) so you'll keep having problems.Sometimes cheapest isn't best value - sorry!


Thank you for the reply, I can not find that review, wondering what part of the crank they are referring to.

POWYSWALES

Thank you for the reply, I can not find that review, wondering what part … Thank you for the reply, I can not find that review, wondering what part of the crank they are referring to.


It's the first one on the site for that bike!
https://www.decathlon.co.uk/hoptown-300-folding-bike-grey-id_8352595.html
Probably the cheap bottom bracket. Decathlon will fix it but honestly you'll keep having problems. Seat posts seem to be a big problem area. Return it and get a better bike. This one is a false economy.

Just for the record, I'm not recommending the Hoptown - if it were my own money I'd scrimp, save and spend more for something better. But forced to buy something at this price point I'd look at Decathlon rather than the GO option.

jaydeeuk1

If you do i can highly recommend the bafang bbs02 48v 750w motor. Pair it … If you do i can highly recommend the bafang bbs02 48v 750w motor. Pair it up with a 30q battery to get best from it. Really simple to fit and easy to program to kick out 1500w, around Belper I find cars get in my way. Peddle nice and easy and I get 25-30mph, some effort 35mph+. Forget front hub based motors if you're wanting to zip up hills, they're rubbish on anything but flats.



Any advice/recommendations on where to buy the motor and battery? Have you fitted it to any of the bikes mentioned in the thread? I've been tempted to do this, seems a nice little project.

QuantumInfo

how do you do that?


There are a few ways, but basically you need
1) motor, which could either be a hub motor at the centre of one of your wheels, or a 'mid drive' one that uses the chain just like you do.
2) Controller, turns battery power plus a throttle's input into something the motor can use
3) battery, for power storage.

Unfortunately there's no one size fits all approach here so do some research.

jaydeeuk1

If you do i can highly recommend the bafang bbs02 48v 750w motor. Pair it … If you do i can highly recommend the bafang bbs02 48v 750w motor. Pair it up with a 30q battery to get best from it. Really simple to fit and easy to program to kick out 1500w, around Belper I find cars get in my way. Peddle nice and easy and I get 25-30mph, some effort 35mph+. Forget front hub based motors if you're wanting to zip up hills, they're rubbish on anything but flats.


Hmm, the BBS01 costs £320 with no battery, the 02's a little more than that. Seems expensive, but hub motor kits look to be maybe £50 cheaper and they couldn't be applied to a different bike afterwards. Given I paid £70 for the bike this is all getting a bit expensive ;P

stoopid_name

Any suggestions ? I see this at Halfords for £320 inc hub gears, rack, … Any suggestions ? I see this at Halfords for £320 inc hub gears, rack, guards at 14kg. On paper seems good value.



For anyone to make a sensible suggestion people would need to know more about you, what sort of riding you will be doing, will you be a fair weather or all weather cyclist, your weight and height, your strength/age and the importance to you of speed, exercise, reliability. Maybe a 3 speed hub would be ok for you or even ideal if you are a all weather cyclist. Maybe its for a commute and you have many hills in your area and need to arrive not to sweaty for work.

This Halfords model is lightweight appears to have a cassette based rear wheel and decent derailleur, this bodes well for long term use if you are a regular cyclist. It's not ideal if you are a all weather cyclist it means if you take the bike out in the rain you will need to regular service the drive train. Generally it looks like a great bike though. You have to remember with Halfords that they like to price high some of the time so they can do big discount promotions with big reductions so to me Halfords is a retailer best selecting your bike before hand and then playing the waiting game for a promotion. It's quite possible you can get that bike sub £300 at the best time. When I bought my Carrera Subway 8 it was £350 full price but I managed to get it down to about £266 after a 20% off offer plus online cashback, plus I got £80 of accessories thrown in as part of the offer. I chose accessories that were mainly discounted which fixed up another bike I had at the time because they allowed the purchase of bike spares too not just accessories. Always worth popping into any Halfords you come across on your travels to see if they have any individual store bargains too.

http://www.halfords.com/cycling/bikes/folding-bikes/carrera-intercity-folding-bike-blue

Other options;

https://www.decathlon.co.uk/tilt-500-folding-bike-blue-id_8352597.html

Everyone hates sportsdirect because of the way they treat staff but this is a nicely done aluminium frame bike with all weather nexus 7 hub for only £265 delivered.

sportsdirect.com/mud…023


Edited by: "bonzobanana" 18th May

BeatMaster

Any advice/recommendations on where to buy the motor and battery? Have … Any advice/recommendations on where to buy the motor and battery? Have you fitted it to any of the bikes mentioned in the thread? I've been tempted to do this, seems a nice little project.




http://eclipsebikes.com/index.php?cPath=26_27&osCsid=27595ef197e773f7b7650ee17ef032a1

I bought my battery from above and motor from ebay as the motor kits weren't in stock. They're about the only UK based retailer I've seen recommended any where.

Don't get from HK or china.

Theres a thread on google listing compatible bikes, but basically any standard sized bottom bracket is compatible.

You'll need some bike tools to remove the crank etc, and a soldering iron and heat shrink to connect battery to motor.

Bear in mind the kit and 48v battery will add around 8kg (for around 11ah battery) so negates some of the advantage of a folding bike (although you'll probably find with speed boost you can cycle 10+ miles without breaking a sweat). I went for a bike with hydraulic disc brakes as the extra weight is noticeable downhill.

Also buy a programming cable (mine was £10 or so from amazon) as you can them derestrict the motor, pump more amps through the controller and make it hell of a lot better than the (crap) stock configuration.

You can attach the electric brake levels and a gear sensor to help stop clunky changes and destroying your chain. I didn't bother, I programmed in a short delay so to change gear I stop pedalling, wait 1/4s then change gear, pedal slowly again to engage and then full throttle it. Nice and smooth even changing up hill.
Edited by: "jaydeeuk1" 18th May

i can see the bike nerds have found this deal and are busy giving their 10p worth.

Its a cheap £125 folding bike............that it
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text