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COMPASSFlip Flop Bike £159.20 at Blacks
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COMPASSFlip Flop Bike £159.20 at Blacks

£159.20£19920%Blacks Deals
44
Posted 15th Apr

This deal is expired. Here are some options that might interest you:

A very simple bike but could be good for someone new to cycling looking to get out and about.

  • Single speed bike from Compass
  • Flip flop rear hub – switch to fixed gear or freewheel
  • Flat handlebars – for an upright position
  • Steel frame and forks
  • One gear – for easy maintenance
  • Includes sticker set to customise bike
  • Recommended activity – commuting / recreational cycling
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lumsdot15/04/2020 10:26

A bicycle gear derailleur is pretty much bullet proof and needs nothing …A bicycle gear derailleur is pretty much bullet proof and needs nothing but a bit of oil on chain.And maybe every 5 years ,tweak some of the adjusting screws to keep it running in line, its been around for a hundred years and will probably be be around for another hundred years

I can't tell if you're joking?

Most definitely not bullet proof - as I'm sure any keen cyclist will tell you!

They're very easily damaged if you crash, lean your bike the wrong way, bike falls over, someone decides to lean their bike on yours and... Plenty more ways!

Adjusting screws shouldn't really need adjusting as they just limit the extremes of the derailleur. The tension adjuster however will need adjustment regularly over time (depending on your cables ofc) as the cables stretch.

Much simpler to use a single speed if you want a very easy to maintain run around bike.
rourkey315/04/2020 10:22

I was looking at this bike the other day for someone else, I think it's …I was looking at this bike the other day for someone else, I think it's really good. More and more people going for bikes with one gear because of the simple maintenance.I haven't seen this up close but for that money it's worth a try. There isn't a lot that can go wrong with it and can be easily repaired at home.


A bicycle gear derailleur is pretty much bullet proof and needs nothing but a bit of oil on chain.
And maybe every 5 years ,tweak some of the adjusting screws to keep it running in line, its been around for a hundred years and will probably be be around for another hundred years
44 Comments
I was looking at this bike the other day for someone else, I think it's really good. More and more people going for bikes with one gear because of the simple maintenance.
I haven't seen this up close but for that money it's worth a try. There isn't a lot that can go wrong with it and can be easily repaired at home.
rourkey315/04/2020 10:22

I was looking at this bike the other day for someone else, I think it's …I was looking at this bike the other day for someone else, I think it's really good. More and more people going for bikes with one gear because of the simple maintenance.I haven't seen this up close but for that money it's worth a try. There isn't a lot that can go wrong with it and can be easily repaired at home.


Any ideas on gearing and tyre clearance? I can't find any specs for it
rourkey315/04/2020 10:22

I was looking at this bike the other day for someone else, I think it's …I was looking at this bike the other day for someone else, I think it's really good. More and more people going for bikes with one gear because of the simple maintenance.I haven't seen this up close but for that money it's worth a try. There isn't a lot that can go wrong with it and can be easily repaired at home.


A bicycle gear derailleur is pretty much bullet proof and needs nothing but a bit of oil on chain.
And maybe every 5 years ,tweak some of the adjusting screws to keep it running in line, its been around for a hundred years and will probably be be around for another hundred years
DavidW00715/04/2020 10:24

Any ideas on gearing and tyre clearance? I can't find any specs for it


No I can only see what you can, that's why I didn't buy last week, maybe there is a YouTube review?
What happens if your going down hill fast
I use my bike for leisure and I would definitely think or try if you can before buying. Reason is that you might regret it once you go uphill. Changing to an easier gear makes ride better. With single gear you might end up a bad experience and not take up cycling.
lumsdot15/04/2020 10:26

A bicycle gear derailleur is pretty much bullet proof and needs nothing …A bicycle gear derailleur is pretty much bullet proof and needs nothing but a bit of oil on chain.And maybe every 5 years ,tweak some of the adjusting screws to keep it running in line, its been around for a hundred years and will probably be be around for another hundred years


The derailleur isn't really the problem, but they do need cleaning, maintenance and eventually replacing. My bikes all have gears but for a commuter I think this is a great set up, I wouldn't take it touring the pennines though
lumsdot15/04/2020 10:26

A bicycle gear derailleur is pretty much bullet proof and needs nothing …A bicycle gear derailleur is pretty much bullet proof and needs nothing but a bit of oil on chain.And maybe every 5 years ,tweak some of the adjusting screws to keep it running in line, its been around for a hundred years and will probably be be around for another hundred years

I can't tell if you're joking?

Most definitely not bullet proof - as I'm sure any keen cyclist will tell you!

They're very easily damaged if you crash, lean your bike the wrong way, bike falls over, someone decides to lean their bike on yours and... Plenty more ways!

Adjusting screws shouldn't really need adjusting as they just limit the extremes of the derailleur. The tension adjuster however will need adjustment regularly over time (depending on your cables ofc) as the cables stretch.

Much simpler to use a single speed if you want a very easy to maintain run around bike.
Ritss15/04/2020 10:33

What happens if your going down hill fast



It is a flip flop hub , so when running single speed just freewheel.
If you have it set to fixed you may find out what the word supplesse means when cycling!!!
rourkey315/04/2020 10:39

The derailleur isn't really the problem, but they do need cleaning, …The derailleur isn't really the problem, but they do need cleaning, maintenance and eventually replacing. My bikes all have gears but for a commuter I think this is a great set up, I wouldn't take it touring the pennines though


The cogs on the flippy hub will need replacing also, they will turn into sharks fins
lumsdot15/04/2020 10:43

The cogs on the flippy hub will need replacing also, they will turn into …The cogs on the flippy hub will need replacing also, they will turn into sharks fins


No experience of these flip flop things, and not sure how they benefit the rider. This bike perfect for certain situations and useless for others so up to the individual buying to pro and con it I suppose. I like it though
jaypeek15/04/2020 10:34

I use my bike for leisure and I would definitely think or try if you can …I use my bike for leisure and I would definitely think or try if you can before buying. Reason is that you might regret it once you go uphill. Changing to an easier gear makes ride better. With single gear you might end up a bad experience and not take up cycling.

This bike should be £100 there is nothing to it but a frame and a bunch of daily disposable ‘components’.
Seems to be only one size in stock, the 53cm.

I could make use of a simple single speed bike, but why oh why do they all have to be so simple that mudguard mountings arent included. Fashion over function. The Decathlon/B-Twin one is the same. Great value, but no ruddy way to mount a mudguard cleanly. decathlon.co.uk/elo…tml
Sturmey Archer hub gears would make this a more useful bike for the average commuter.
rourkey315/04/2020 10:39

The derailleur isn't really the problem, but they do need cleaning, …The derailleur isn't really the problem, but they do need cleaning, maintenance and eventually replacing. My bikes all have gears but for a commuter I think this is a great set up, I wouldn't take it touring the pennines though



YouTalkinToMe15/04/2020 10:43

I can't tell if you're joking?Most definitely not bullet proof - as I'm …I can't tell if you're joking?Most definitely not bullet proof - as I'm sure any keen cyclist will tell you!They're very easily damaged if you crash, lean your bike the wrong way, bike falls over, someone decides to lean their bike on yours and... Plenty more ways!Adjusting screws shouldn't really need adjusting as they just limit the extremes of the derailleur. The tension adjuster however will need adjustment regularly over time (depending on your cables ofc) as the cables stretch.Much simpler to use a single speed if you want a very easy to maintain run around bike.


In reply to both...

I'm still running the Specialized Sirrus I bought used on ebay back in 2007. It gets used for daily commuting in all weathers as well as rides out if the weather is conducive and, touching wood, I've NEVER had an issue with my rear derailleur. I set it up when I put the bike back together and had to tweak it when I changed the cable but that's it. It get's a cursory wipe on the occasion that my bike gets treated to a wash.

The bike has been down the road a few times thanks to car drivers and pedestrians, left in public bike racks etc. Still no problems. Never had issues with any of my previous bikes either. They weren't wrapped up in cotton wool either.
endofdays15/04/2020 11:56

In reply to both...I'm still running the Specialized Sirrus I bought used …In reply to both...I'm still running the Specialized Sirrus I bought used on ebay back in 2007. It gets used for daily commuting in all weathers as well as rides out if the weather is conducive and, touching wood, I've NEVER had an issue with my rear derailleur. I set it up when I put the bike back together and had to tweak it when I changed the cable but that's it. It get's a cursory wipe on the occasion that my bike gets treated to a wash. The bike has been down the road a few times thanks to car drivers and pedestrians, left in public bike racks etc. Still no problems. Never had issues with any of my previous bikes either. They weren't wrapped up in cotton wool either.


I had a sirris and really think it was my favourite bike, it did get destroyed in storm but no fault of the bike. Bought a hoy shizuoka to replace it and had to replace chain and chain set within 12 months from new. Sirrus was cheaper but better in my opinion
Cheaper to buy a second hand bike
A single gear like this is fine if you live on the flat. If you have hills then this is going to give you problems dependent on the hills and your own strength/fitness.

Buying a single gear bike often lets people who think they live in a flat area to discover just how many inclines they actually have.
YouTalkinToMe15/04/2020 10:43

I can't tell if you're joking?Most definitely not bullet proof - as I'm …I can't tell if you're joking?Most definitely not bullet proof - as I'm sure any keen cyclist will tell you!They're very easily damaged if you crash, lean your bike the wrong way, bike falls over, someone decides to lean their bike on yours and... Plenty more ways!Adjusting screws shouldn't really need adjusting as they just limit the extremes of the derailleur. The tension adjuster however will need adjustment regularly over time (depending on your cables ofc) as the cables stretch.Much simpler to use a single speed if you want a very easy to maintain run around bike.


Can you come and do my gears. I wouldn't trust them farther than they could throw me
Gave up on multiple gears 15 years ago and never looked back. I've had my single speed bikes since then and just replace chains, brake pads, chain rings and rear cogs as needed.

I love how my local bike shop owner only has single speed / fixed bikes, I personally think that speaks volumes.

You have see both sides.

1.) If you're new to cycling a SS is great because you don't have to worry about stopping in a high gear at lights.

2.) If you're new to cycling a SS is terrible because you poor legs might find it hard when you go up a hill and that might not feel nice.

3.) If your new to cycling SS is great because service and maintenance are easy in comparison to bikes with derailleurs.

If you own a bike and rarely change gear then this sort of bike is for you.
Edited by: "mogsog" 15th Apr
xigent15/04/2020 11:39

Sturmey Archer hub gears would make this a more useful bike for the …Sturmey Archer hub gears would make this a more useful bike for the average commuter.


And cost more than the whole bike!
xigent15/04/2020 11:39

Sturmey Archer hub gears would make this a more useful bike for the …Sturmey Archer hub gears would make this a more useful bike for the average commuter.


The 3 speed hubs are near useless for the hilly north.
This bike is for the flat and even with no gear system will still be heavy.
I think the lack of maintenance isn't worth not having any gears. Without any gears I'd come to a grinding halt whenever I hit any incline. You'll be very hard pressed to find any routes that don't have hills.

I've had my bike for a year now and not had to adjust the derailleur yet so I don't really think it's worth the hassle. Admittedly I did have to change the cassette after a new chain but that was a 10 minute job that I'm sure any bike shop could do for you
Edit: If a cheap sprocket has worn away on an 8 speed cassette then it'll still wear on a single speed. Maybe even faster as the wear won't be spread over different sprockets
Edited by: "ChrisRX" 15th Apr
endofdays15/04/2020 11:56

In reply to both...I'm still running the Specialized Sirrus I bought used …In reply to both...I'm still running the Specialized Sirrus I bought used on ebay back in 2007. It gets used for daily commuting in all weathers as well as rides out if the weather is conducive and, touching wood, I've NEVER had an issue with my rear derailleur. I set it up when I put the bike back together and had to tweak it when I changed the cable but that's it. It get's a cursory wipe on the occasion that my bike gets treated to a wash. The bike has been down the road a few times thanks to car drivers and pedestrians, left in public bike racks etc. Still no problems. Never had issues with any of my previous bikes either. They weren't wrapped up in cotton wool either.


I was going to say I've never had an issue with a rear derailleur either, then I remembered I wore out the bushings on the plastic guide sprockets on one, after many years use with negligible cleaning, and bodged them by swapping them so the least worn was next to the sprockets and packed the loosest one. Worse still, I once clipped some rubble in the middle of a road, and ended up coming to a sudden stop with a broken axle and snapped derailleur hooking the spokes.


Also worn through a couple of front changers, someone snapped off a third in a bike rack by playing with the levers, and the teeth on an alloy crank wheel on a brand new 10 speed bike wore out after just 5 months use.


No way would I have a one speed bike though. Wouldn't a single gear wear out the chain quicker, as it would be under more tension going up hill? My father had a second hand one (Carlton?) several decades ago, within a week he'd fitted gears and taken the single gear off, even though the rear wheel was threaded on both sides.
Edited by: "melted" 15th Apr
What is a size 53? I’m 5’9 and no idea if this will fit!
lumsdot15/04/2020 10:26

A bicycle gear derailleur is pretty much bullet proof and needs nothing …A bicycle gear derailleur is pretty much bullet proof and needs nothing but a bit of oil on chain.And maybe every 5 years ,tweak some of the adjusting screws to keep it running in line, its been around for a hundred years and will probably be be around for another hundred years



Incorrect. After regular use, even if well maintained, a bike with a rear derailleur will eventually need new inner and outer cables, a new chain, and eventually new cassette or even chainrings.

Single speed bikes are low maintenance, that much is obvious (or so I thought anyway). There's a reason that mid-high end town/touring/commuting bikes often have internally geared Nexus/Alfine/Rohloff hubs and/or belt drives. It's because they're also lower maintenance than exposed derailleur systems. Rear derailleurs with exposed gearing are good for low weight/racing, but to claim they're low maintenance is kind of comical.

Anyway this deal is much better than the average bike shaped object post, so have some heat.
I've been riding my mountain bike round the streets during the lockdown as it's so quiet. I rarely need to change gear as it's very flat but even the hint of an incline makes me realise I couldn't live with a fixed gear bike.
Joey_FernandoVlogs15/04/2020 13:56

What is a size 53? I’m 5’9 and no idea if this will fit!



I looked into this bike the other day and messaged Go Outdoors on FB to double check sizing.

I was told the following:

53 would be roughly a small and so would be best for those under 5'6 in height. 55 would be medium so around the 5'8-9 ft region.
Ts189915/04/2020 12:07

Cheaper to buy a second hand bike


And get arrested by Police.
lumsdot15/04/2020 10:26

A bicycle gear derailleur is pretty much bullet proof and needs nothing …A bicycle gear derailleur is pretty much bullet proof and needs nothing but a bit of oil on chain.And maybe every 5 years ,tweak some of the adjusting screws to keep it running in line, its been around for a hundred years and will probably be be around for another hundred years


As others have noted, this is nonsense. Cables stretch for one, springs in the lower pivot can come loose, stretch, compress or snap, the pulleys can wear down and cause chain wear as a result, they can also fall out and/or crack etc.

It's a simple device with a lot of moving parts. All of which can go wrong and regularly do - else spare derailleurs would never be sold or serviced.
melted15/04/2020 13:52

I was going to say I've never had an issue with a rear derailleur either, …I was going to say I've never had an issue with a rear derailleur either, then I remembered I wore out the bushings on the plastic guide sprockets on one, after many years use with negligible cleaning, and bodged them by swapping them so the least worn was next to the sprockets and packed the loosest one. Worse still, I once clipped some rubble in the middle of a road, and ended up coming to a sudden stop with a broken axle and snapped derailleur hooking the spokes. Also worn through a couple of front changers, someone snapped off a third in a bike rack by playing with the levers, and the teeth on an alloy crank wheel on a brand new 10 speed bike wore out after just 5 months use. No way would I have a one speed bike though. Wouldn't a single gear wear out the chain quicker, as it would be under more tension going up hill? My father had a second hand one (Carlton?) several decades ago, within a week he'd fitted gears and taken the single gear off, even though the rear wheel was threaded on both sides.


Re a single speed and tension - no - as in theory, with a geared bike the chain is under the same constant tension when being driven (the slack is a bit different, but that's the derailleur doing its job). Motorbikes only have one rear sprocket and rely on a gearbox and wear out no faster or slower
Also: steel frame here...this aint gonna be a light bike for a single speed.
cactusbrandy15/04/2020 14:57

As others have noted, this is nonsense. Cables stretch for one, springs in …As others have noted, this is nonsense. Cables stretch for one, springs in the lower pivot can come loose, stretch, compress or snap, the pulleys can wear down and cause chain wear as a result, they can also fall out and/or crack etc. It's a simple device with a lot of moving parts. All of which can go wrong and regularly do - else spare derailleurs would never be sold or serviced.


At least you can service them easier than keeping these wheels of cheese un-buckled, which they probably will be before you've ever ridden on them or once you've slid off the road on the plastic tyres which wouldn't stop because you used your brakes twice which is once too many times. Just speculating, maybe it's a great bike, I'm gonna try and buy something for around this money and find out.
royaltee15/04/2020 15:09

At least you can service them easier than keeping these wheels of cheese …At least you can service them easier than keeping these wheels of cheese un-buckled, which they probably will be before you've ever ridden on them or once you've slid off the road on the plastic tyres which wouldn't stop because you used your brakes twice which is once too many times. Just speculating, maybe it's a great bike, I'm gonna try and buy something for around this money and find out.


For sure. I don't rate this for the money at all. It'll be revolting to ride no doubt.
ChrisRX15/04/2020 13:31

I think the lack of maintenance isn't worth not having any gears. Without …I think the lack of maintenance isn't worth not having any gears. Without any gears I'd come to a grinding halt whenever I hit any incline. You'll be very hard pressed to find any routes that don't have hills.I've had my bike for a year now and not had to adjust the derailleur yet so I don't really think it's worth the hassle. Admittedly I did have to change the cassette after a new chain but that was a 10 minute job that I'm sure any bike shop could do for youEdit: If a cheap sprocket has worn away on an 8 speed cassette then it'll still wear on a single speed. Maybe even faster as the wear won't be spread over different sprockets


I don't know about this bike. However, typically a single speed/fixed bike will use a 1/8th inch wide chain, rather than a standard 3/32nd inch one. A wider chain spreads the load more evenly. With a derailleur, it needs to be able to flex to change to another gear. Small sprockets wear a lot faster than bigger ones, partly because there are fewer teeth, but also because the angle of the chain is tighter.

I've got a bike with a flip-flop hub. I haven't ever used the freewheel much, but it was nice to have once when I pulled a muscle and every pedal stroke hurt. I used it in rolling countryside, and it made what would have been a boring 30 minute commute a bit more fun to ride. When you don't have the alternative, of changing to a lower gear, you can climb steeper hills than you would think.
To put things into context, I have a 6.92 KM commute with a 70M elevation gain. I'm a 33 year old man and use a SS fixed with a 50 x 16 ratio. I don't find hills much of an issue on it.

I did invest in clips and shoes which helps a lot. I think the lack of maintenance is absolutely worth the extra riding effort.
cactusbrandy15/04/2020 15:04

Also: steel frame here...this aint gonna be a light bike for a single …Also: steel frame here...this aint gonna be a light bike for a single speed.


I don't know where this bike is made but some of the other cheap fixed gear bikes were using a 1040 steel which is close to the properties of chromoly steel and a relatively light frame. The bikes were roughly about 11kg or just under maybe 10.5kg due to the lack of heavier components. That's pretty light and surely not a problem for most people. I think someone put on tannus solid tyres on such a bike so it was pretty much zero maintenance and was still under 11kg or close to it and didn't have to carry inner tubes or pumps etc so another weight saving. These don't work for everyone but for those wanting to get fit and develop strong legs they are obviously very good. You can virtualise gears by zigzagging up hills so as long as the roads are quiet and you can use the full span of the road it is possible to do hills sometimes quite easily.

I guess its worth pointing out always worth checking locally to see if there are any bikes going dirt cheap, freecycle, gumtree etc which basically have knackered drivechains because it doesn't take much to strip a bike of those parts and get a simple screw on cog to turn a bike into a fixed gear bike. In the absence of horizontal drop outs you may need to create a chain tensioner which sometimes you can use an old derailleur for. Sometimes a bike based on such problematic low end components is best converted to fixed gear or single speed rather than mess about trying to get some no name derailleur and shifters to work correctly. Toys R Us, Argos, catalogue bikes etc.

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There's pros and cons and preferences to everything with bikes, I think this is a great bike for the price and when I started cycling again rather than go for a belt and hub I'd have probably gone with a single speed chain drive as it's all I needed at the time.

That said I don't find derailleurs are anywhere near as unreliable or problematic as made out above, they're not perfect but in the last eight years of regular cycling including off road through the winter, endurance racing and plenty of crashes I've only broken two derailleurs. One was a mechanical failure and was back up and running the next for £40 and the other I had a big crash with but still using the derailleur bent back into shape, shifting is a little off but it's mostly fine. Both bikes have done up to 12 hours rides where their gear range has easily been worth the minor hassle I've had from the derailleurs.
It's out of stock already.
SirYoy15/04/2020 16:42

It's out of stock already.




That's my fault. I posted the deal on the Flat Earth Society forum.
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