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Computer Programming: Learn Any Programming Language in 2 Hours £7.18 (Free with Kindle Unlimited) @ Amazon UK via Kindle
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Computer Programming: Learn Any Programming Language in 2 Hours £7.18 (Free with Kindle Unlimited) @ Amazon UK via Kindle

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Posted 7th Jul

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It covers 9 programming languages.
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Not sure that many programming languages can be learned in 2 hours. Maybe basic syntax but for somebody who already knows how to code already.
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Free on Kindle Unlimited. NOT free on Kindle
Not sure that many programming languages can be learned in 2 hours. Maybe basic syntax but for somebody who already knows how to code already.
Can anyone who comes across this deal pleas recommend a good, solid and reputable course to learn SQL please? It would help immensely and I’d be extremely grateful. Thanks :-)
Kindle Price:

£7.18
Free on kindle for me. Don't have kindle unlimited. Heat 🔥 added.
MICKYBLUE07/07/2019 10:05

Can anyone who comes across this deal pleas recommend a good, solid and …Can anyone who comes across this deal pleas recommend a good, solid and reputable course to learn SQL please? It would help immensely and I’d be extremely grateful. Thanks :-)


To be good at SQL which I was years ago, you really need to know what platform you are going to be working on. Althought the basics are a standard all the devil is in the platform specifics once you get beyond the easy stuff. The basics can be picked up for free on a multitude of websites. There is a big difference between query and update compared to DB design. Performance tuning is a dark art and a whole new skill again - which I only ever touched slightly and was never competent at.

Can't recommend a specific courses as I learnt on the job and 20 years ago at that - have since forgotten 90% of it. But as I said, I would find a guide written for the platform you are interested in. SQL is all a bit old school now. Graph DBs tend too be getting much more attention and tend to use different query syntax. Not something I know anything about though.
MICKYBLUE07/07/2019 10:05

Can anyone who comes across this deal pleas recommend a good, solid and …Can anyone who comes across this deal pleas recommend a good, solid and reputable course to learn SQL please? It would help immensely and I’d be extremely grateful. Thanks :-)


I can personally train users in Oracle, Ms SQL, OR MYSQL, typically can get a user understanding tables, views and select queries, but depends on your budget,

Normally charge users about £40 an hour over a skype/share call for up to 3 users.
W3schools has good basic info on SQL and other web programming languages. More advanced tuition needs a teacher to explain imho
How is this a deal? It's free on Kindle unlimited like the other billion books in the Kindle UNLIMITED library
relly07/07/2019 11:18

Free on kindle for me. Don't have kindle unlimited. Heat 🔥 added.


If you click "free to read" it puts you on a subscription after a set period of time.
JimmyFiveO07/07/2019 13:32

To be good at SQL which I was years ago, you really need to know what …To be good at SQL which I was years ago, you really need to know what platform you are going to be working on. Althought the basics are a standard all the devil is in the platform specifics once you get beyond the easy stuff. The basics can be picked up for free on a multitude of websites. There is a big difference between query and update compared to DB design. Performance tuning is a dark art and a whole new skill again - which I only ever touched slightly and was never competent at.Can't recommend a specific courses as I learnt on the job and 20 years ago at that - have since forgotten 90% of it. But as I said, I would find a guide written for the platform you are interested in. SQL is all a bit old school now. Graph DBs tend too be getting much more attention and tend to use different query syntax. Not something I know anything about though.


SQL is its own language. You can run the scripts directly against the DB, they are not programming language specific.
MICKYBLUE07/07/2019 10:05

Can anyone who comes across this deal pleas recommend a good, solid and …Can anyone who comes across this deal pleas recommend a good, solid and reputable course to learn SQL please? It would help immensely and I’d be extremely grateful. Thanks :-)


Try the khan academy course, I found it really useful as an introduction.
MICKYBLUE07/07/2019 10:05

Can anyone who comes across this deal pleas recommend a good, solid and …Can anyone who comes across this deal pleas recommend a good, solid and reputable course to learn SQL please? It would help immensely and I’d be extremely grateful. Thanks :-)


udemy.com/top…ql/
The.Lone.Ranger11/07/2019 20:05

SQL is its own language. You can run the scripts directly against the DB, …SQL is its own language. You can run the scripts directly against the DB, they are not programming language specific.


And your point is? I think you missed my point completely. The platform I am talking about is the DB e.g. Oracle, Postgress etc, not any programming language that might execute SQL. The basics between platforms are similar but the details are not. I think maybe this is not your area of expertise....
JimmyFiveO11/07/2019 20:17

And your point is? I think you missed my point completely. The platform I …And your point is? I think you missed my point completely. The platform I am talking about is the DB e.g. Oracle, Postgress etc, not any programming language that might execute SQL. The basics between platforms are similar but the details are not. I think maybe this is not your area of expertise....


Only slightly hostile response. I probably read your comment too fast and I was thinking of MS SQL and not requiring a specific programming language.
The.Lone.Ranger11/07/2019 20:04

If you click "free to read" it puts you on a subscription after a set …If you click "free to read" it puts you on a subscription after a set period of time.


I didn't click free to read. I clicked 'buy now for £0.00'
The.Lone.Ranger11/07/2019 20:23

Only slightly hostile response. I probably read your comment too fast and …Only slightly hostile response. I probably read your comment too fast and I was thinking of MS SQL and not requiring a specific programming language.


Sorry, in a bit of a grumpy mood and probably came across all wrong. I do apologise if I was a bit sharp. I get to see a lot of DB 'experts' who couldn't explain the difference between an inner and outer join. The reason I recommend learning on a specific platform is due to the big differences between platforms. I started on IBM DB2 on a mainframe 25 years ago and have worked on Oracle for years. I am well out of date now as I don't use it anymore - my role is more senior these days. On small DBs you get quite a bit of latitude but when dealing with high volume DBs then real platform specific skill is needed. Knowing how to read an explain plan, when and how to use DB hints etc. Even experienced DB folks are often very poor at using indexes appropriately - usually assuming that just adding more indexes is always the right thing to do, regardless of volume and type of data, impact on updating indexes on writing to DB etc. Anyway, sorry if I was being an arse.
JimmyFiveO11/07/2019 21:22

Sorry, in a bit of a grumpy mood and probably came across all wrong. I do …Sorry, in a bit of a grumpy mood and probably came across all wrong. I do apologise if I was a bit sharp. I get to see a lot of DB 'experts' who couldn't explain the difference between an inner and outer join. The reason I recommend learning on a specific platform is due to the big differences between platforms. I started on IBM DB2 on a mainframe 25 years ago and have worked on Oracle for years. I am well out of date now as I don't use it anymore - my role is more senior these days. On small DBs you get quite a bit of latitude but when dealing with high volume DBs then real platform specific skill is needed. Knowing how to read an explain plan, when and how to use DB hints etc. Even experienced DB folks are often very poor at using indexes appropriately - usually assuming that just adding more indexes is always the right thing to do, regardless of volume and type of data, impact on updating indexes on writing to DB etc. Anyway, sorry if I was being an arse.


UPDATE JimmyFiveO
SET Coffee_Intake = 'yes'
WHERE mood = 'grumpy'

JimmyFiveO11/07/2019 21:22

Sorry, in a bit of a grumpy mood and probably came across all wrong. I do …Sorry, in a bit of a grumpy mood and probably came across all wrong. I do apologise if I was a bit sharp. I get to see a lot of DB 'experts' who couldn't explain the difference between an inner and outer join. The reason I recommend learning on a specific platform is due to the big differences between platforms. I started on IBM DB2 on a mainframe 25 years ago and have worked on Oracle for years. I am well out of date now as I don't use it anymore - my role is more senior these days. On small DBs you get quite a bit of latitude but when dealing with high volume DBs then real platform specific skill is needed. Knowing how to read an explain plan, when and how to use DB hints etc. Even experienced DB folks are often very poor at using indexes appropriately - usually assuming that just adding more indexes is always the right thing to do, regardless of volume and type of data, impact on updating indexes on writing to DB etc. Anyway, sorry if I was being an arse.


No problem. I only have experience with MS SQL other than a little dabbling with Oracle about 20 years ago.
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