Convector Heater was Was £24.99 now £11.97! Free c&c @ currys
528°Expired

Convector Heater was Was £24.99 now £11.97! Free c&c @ currys

21
Found 29th Jun
With 2000 W of power this heater can warm up a room in no time, all you have to do is plug it in and get comfortable. The radiator style heater can sit up against a wall without adding any clutter.

This is only available for C&C, stock is limited, but there are local stores to myself that have stock, so have a nosy.

Top comments

Original Poster

nickhalluk7 m ago

Surely its not that cold today?


Surely there are more days in the year than today.....
21 Comments

Surely its not that cold today?

Original Poster

nickhalluk7 m ago

Surely its not that cold today?


Surely there are more days in the year than today.....

kimbo87

Surely there are more days in the year than today.....

sad to say but you are right

Smart purchase right now!

Whats cheaper an oil filled radiator or one of these?

GasGaGlide

Whats cheaper an oil filled radiator or one of these?



Depends which one costs most

GasGaGlide

Whats cheaper an oil filled radiator or one of these?



Depends what you're looking for really. Obviously the oil filled radiators take a while to heat up but once they're warmed up they'll switch themselves off and radiate heat for a while. These will warm up quickly, and will switch off for a short while but they lose heat rapidly so will be quickly back on. Depends on how much you use the room you'll be using them in.

drnkbeer

Depends what you're looking for really. Obviously the oil filled … Depends what you're looking for really. Obviously the oil filled radiators take a while to heat up but once they're warmed up they'll switch themselves off and radiate heat for a while. These will warm up quickly, and will switch off for a short while but they lose heat rapidly so will be quickly back on. Depends on how much you use the room you'll be using them in.



Ah thanks for help, have on constant and looking to save electricity so looks like oil filled is right for me.

Though did have one of these convector heaters, was lovely the amount of heat and how fast it heated the room. If only electric was cheaper.

Thanks for your help :).

GasGaGlide

Ah thanks for help, have on constant and looking to save electricity so … Ah thanks for help, have on constant and looking to save electricity so looks like oil filled is right for me.Though did have one of these convector heaters, was lovely the amount of heat and how fast it heated the room. If only electric was cheaper.Thanks for your help :).



That's the great thing about those sort of heaters, instant heat but it quickly dissipates, I'd only use it to quickly warm up a room that either don't intend to be in for long or use it to warm a room quickly before getting into bed. It's also worth looking into loft insulation if you're finding you're losing heat too quickly.

Good luck on the oil heater front, now would be the time to buy second hand if you have a look around you might spot something.

These will all be reduced to clear because Summer Is Here.....no, wait, these will be Top Sellers...because Summer Is Here (_;)

Just a word of warning.... please do not purchase one of these, or any other similar convector type electrical heater, if you are planning to have it on high heat for more than a few hours a day, or if you are plugging it into an extension lead.

In either of the above scenarios, an oil filled radiator is more suitable.

Also bear in mind that these do not normally have a topple failsafe switch... If they fall over, they can potentially cause a fire.

hottoast3 h, 17 m ago

Just a word of warning.... please do not purchase one of these, or any …Just a word of warning.... please do not purchase one of these, or any other similar convector type electrical heater, if you are planning to have it on high heat for more than a few hours a day, or if you are plugging it into an extension lead. In either of the above scenarios, an oil filled radiator is more suitable. Also bear in mind that these do not normally have a topple failsafe switch... If they fall over, they can potentially cause a fire.


Not sure what you mean by that. The only possible difference it could make with an extension lead is the power it consumes, so if that's what you're worried about then your advice should be based on the power, not the type of heater. Besides which, if an extension lead is going to overheat it will not take hours to do so.
Edited by: "pibpob" 29th Jun

All electric heaters provide exactly the same amount of heat per unit of electricity.

An extension lead will make no difference to the heat produced or the cost, but it needs to be rated at 10 amps or more for this heater.

I have seen at least 3 of these (same style, not exact same) heaters in the last year with issues, 2 of them with wires melting and going black in the live plug connection, the third with the plug sheathing melted into the extension lead socket.

That is three potential fires.

2 were in a shop and 1was in a school. They were switched on 2kw for 8 hours a day.

Based on what I have seen, I would not recommend them as a main heat source for many hours use per day on a full heat setting.

Just a forewarn about suitability.

Do with it what you will ☺️

hottoast4 h, 55 m ago

I have seen at least 3 of these (same style, not exact same) heaters in …I have seen at least 3 of these (same style, not exact same) heaters in the last year with issues, 2 of them with wires melting and going black in the live plug connection, the third with the plug sheathing melted into the extension lead socket. That is three potential fires. 2 were in a shop and 1was in a school. They were switched on 2kw for 8 hours a day. Based on what I have seen, I would not recommend them as a main heat source for many hours use per day on a full heat setting. Just a forewarn about suitability. Do with it what you will ☺️



That is nothing to do with the type of heater but everything to do with any high current consuming device with a poorly fitted plug and/or a faulty socket.

The plugs were not incorrectly fitted.

I doubt it is coincidence that I have seen 3, all in separate premises, all coincidentally in a faulty socket.

hottoast53 m ago

The plugs were not incorrectly fitted. I doubt it is coincidence that I …The plugs were not incorrectly fitted. I doubt it is coincidence that I have seen 3, all in separate premises, all coincidentally in a faulty socket.



You cite three instances. One sounds like a cheap and nasty extension lead socket. The other two sound like a fault in the plugs. I don't know how you can know that they weren't incorrectly fitted if the damage had already been done when you inspected them. Incorrect fitting doesn't just mean wires in the wrong order; it can mean, for instance, terminals not tightened properly (if rewirable plugs) or not crimped properly (if moulded plugs).

Once again, it makes no difference what type of heater it is, if the fault is at the other end of the cable.
Edited by: "pibpob" 1st Jul

Thanks for your comments.

These were items nobody had ever touched the plugs on. People do not purchase a new item and check the plug terminal connections. They were correctly wired British Standard plugs, with sufficiently tightened connections.

The extension lead was a standard quality. Not an expensive brand, not a cheap and nasty job.

Sounds conclusion, let's just hope that those purchasing them and thinking they can safely be left on full all day, day after day, don't have the scenarios you have identified as being the cause of the things I have personally seen with my own eyes.

I wouldn't like to think of the possible end result.

As I say..... a forewarning to those thinking of purchasing one with the intention of more than occasional use.

Back to your original assertion then: why would an oil-filled radiator's plug be less likely to combust than a convector heater's plug? Bear in mind that you haven't actually got a room full of oil-filled radiators to compare, and that you need to have the same power appliances or you're not going to get the same amount of heat out of them.

As mentioned above, it is a personal opinion, based on what I have seen......

I have seen 3 of these type of heaters in an unsafe condition in the last year, compared to 0 oil filled radiators used in identical type locations.

There is a reason they are cheap, even at full price.

Additionally as mentioned, they have no topple failsafe, and you will be amazed at how many I see are just wedged up on at least one end because the screw on feet fail very quickly.

Each to their own.

The comment I made was offered as an observation to people buying one.

Nobody has to pay any heed.

Again I will reiterate... the ones that had an issue were on for 8 hours a day on high.

I have seen no reason to be wary if only used occasionally, or even regularly on lower heat.
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