Convert all those old extension leads with this PRO ELEC Surge Protected Plug Top £2.14 delivered @ CPC
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Convert all those old extension leads with this PRO ELEC Surge Protected Plug Top £2.14 delivered @ CPC

45
Found 30th Aug 2015
Found these plugs to be an excellent alternative to buying full replacement multiple-gang extension leads. Simply remove the old plug from your current non-surge protected extension lead, replace with this surge protected plug and hey presto it's surge protected!

Not ever found a surge protected extension at this price (although somebody now will LOL :-) ) and if you're buying this then I'd guess you'd have the extension to convert in the first place - making this the most efficient upgrade to surge protection.

Product blurb from site....
Surge Protected Plug Top, 13A Fuse

Surge protected plug designed to protect sensitive electronic equipment from the damage caused by power surges.
Ideal for use with audio/video equipment, computer equipment and other electrical appliances
LED indicator shows that protection is present
13A Fuse fitted
Conforms to BS1363
Connector Body Material: Nylon (Polyamide)
Connector Colour: White
Connector Type: UK Mains Plug
Current Rating: 13A
Voltage Rating V AC: 240V
Fuse Current: 13A
Gender: Plug

45 Comments

Original Poster

Available in different formats as well. As I can see either a) colour of plug &/or b) different fuse - I presume for use on an individual appliance (I'm no sparky!)

Use only these links as searching by product code can return inflated prices (end two digits trick of product code at CPC - for example, adding 20 (already done within links) to these one returns the lowest price)

White 3A = cpc.farnell.com/pro…120
White 5A = cpc.farnell.com/pro…320
White 13A = as originally posted
Black 3A = cpc.farnell.com/pro…020
Black 5A =cpc.farnell.com/pro…120
Black 13A = cpc.farnell.com/pro…220

Edited by: "marnstars" 30th Aug 2015

many thanks for this

Original Poster

Mrman123

many thanks for this



A bit of a hidden gem out there :-)

This is a genuine question... How often do we get damaging surges? I have never had anything damaged by a power surge.

highwayman8155

This is a genuine question... How often do we get damaging surges? I … This is a genuine question... How often do we get damaging surges? I have never had anything damaged by a power surge.



Very rarely. But when it does happen (lightning storm for me), it's incredibly annoying.

Original Poster

highwayman8155

This is a genuine question... How often do we get damaging surges? I … This is a genuine question... How often do we get damaging surges? I have never had anything damaged by a power surge.



Funny enough (almost spooky to be fair). When I was typing, we had some sort of glitch and my son's XB1 went off, as did the house alarm. PC stayed on connected to one of these plugs :-)

Not a true test of effectiveness, but a bit of rather be safer than sorry for the sake of a couple of quid...? is my ten penneth. :-)

highwayman8155

This is a genuine question... How often do we get damaging surges? I … This is a genuine question... How often do we get damaging surges? I have never had anything damaged by a power surge.



It happened to me once: after an electrical storm, my dial-up modem stopped working (Shows how long ago it was!). I presume the "surge" came down the phone line. I bought quite an expensive 8-gang Belkin surge protector after that, with additional inputs for phone cables and a TV aerial.

Its surge protection stopped working years ago (there's a light indicating this), but I still use it. I presume it was hit by a surge, and that these devices are one-use only.

I haven't bothered with surge protection since then. The risk seems very small.

If you want surge protection, buy surge protection. This is placebo levels of usefulness.

It has no joule ratings, no testing information, no equipment warranty....

cnet.com/uk/…rs/

Stop wasting your money on this tat thinking it'll protect you. Buy something that's known to do the job by independent testing.

thewirecutter.com/rev…or/
lifehacker.com/how…999
lifehacker.com/fiv…854

If you feel the need for one, they're not even expensive compared to the equipment they'll most likely be attached to.

edit - as usual, there is a sarcastic reply to this with someone pointing out these are American sites. Sadly, they don't seem to realise that the laws of physics and how electrical surges work, doesn't vary by country. You can buy the listed surge protectors from Amazon and other retails via Google shopping. The information in them is accurate, but the fact that they have links to American Amazon (and other US retailers) within them, seems to not be good enough.

I'm just on the phone now to these US based journalists in the hope they will start a UK based site, mirror their entire article database, and then update the links within to the UK Amazon, all for our superstar HUKD user MINCER.
This might be a little bit straining on UK/US relations, but I'm sure they'll pull through.

I've elaborated more in a reply below.

Edited by: "nomnomnomnom" 30th Aug 2015

nomnomnomnom

If you want surge protection, buy surge protection. This is placebo … If you want surge protection, buy surge protection. This is placebo levels of usefulness.It has no joule ratings, no testing information, no equipment warranty....http://www.cnet.com/uk/news/9-things-you-should-know-about-surge-protectors/Stop wasting your money on this tat thinking it'll protect you. Buy something that's known to do the job by independent testing.http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-surge-protector/http://lifehacker.com/how-to-choose-buy-and-safely-use-a-good-surge-protect-1405568999http://lifehacker.com/five-best-surge-protectors-1444106854If you feel the need for one, they're not even expensive compared to the equipment they'll most likely be attached to.



Yes that American power converter is just what I need in Cumbria. If you are going to have a rant, don't just Google something and post the first link that seems ok.
Or at least add UK to your search terms to take out a lot of the American guff.

£78 at Amazon UK and a handy 120 volt capacity - maybe 2 wired together will work

http://thewirecutter.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/apc_official1.jpg


Edited by: "MINCER" 31st Aug 2015

Original Poster

MINCER

Yes that American power converter is just what I need in Cumbria. If you … Yes that American power converter is just what I need in Cumbria. If you are going to have a rant, don't just Google something and post the first link that seems ok.Or at least add UK to your search terms to take out a lot of the American guff.



I gave my 10penneth worth....surely he's entitled to his 10cents worth LOL
I'd guess he voted cold :-)

Cheers for comments.

nomnomnomnom

If you want surge protection, buy surge protection. This is placebo … If you want surge protection, buy surge protection. This is placebo levels of usefulness.It has no joule ratings, no testing information, no equipment warranty....http://www.cnet.com/uk/news/9-things-you-should-know-about-surge-protectors/Stop wasting your money on this tat thinking it'll protect you. Buy something that's known to do the job by independent testing.http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-surge-protector/http://lifehacker.com/how-to-choose-buy-and-safely-use-a-good-surge-protect-1405568999http://lifehacker.com/five-best-surge-protectors-1444106854If you feel the need for one, they're not even expensive compared to the equipment they'll most likely be attached to.

marnstars

I'd guess he voted cold :-)



"power converter"? What? Do you even know what one of those is, because it's not what I linked.

You could just go to Amazon and look up most of the product ranges in the UK....very few have US only availability. I just checked on Amazon / Google shopping for the recommended products and found ranges for them all available in the UK. The sites I linked are all large editorial sites...you know, ones that carry a little bit of weight. Not only that, but a huge amount of tech sites are US based, so I'm not going to hunt down one with a UK base just to try and appeal to your ignorance of electronics.

The information on how surges work and the protection you need against them don't change based on your country. The fact that you think I should link UK only surge protection links is laughable, given that anyone with basic electronic knowledge should be able to explain what a surge is.

If you're going to be sarcastic, it helps to have a GCSE level of understanding on what you're talking about.




I did not - don't presume.


Edited by: "nomnomnomnom" 30th Aug 2015

nomnomnomnom

If you want surge protection, buy surge protection. This is placebo … If you want surge protection, buy surge protection. This is placebo levels of usefulness.It has no joule ratings, no testing information, no equipment warranty....http://www.cnet.com/uk/news/9-things-you-should-know-about-surge-protectors/Stop wasting your money on this tat thinking it'll protect you. Buy something that's known to do the job by independent testing.http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-surge-protector/http://lifehacker.com/how-to-choose-buy-and-safely-use-a-good-surge-protect-1405568999http://lifehacker.com/five-best-surge-protectors-1444106854If you feel the need for one, they're not even expensive compared to the equipment they'll most likely be attached to.



This is cheap enough and a great deal if it works. However you'll only find out how good it actually is if you get a power surge and by then it's too late. I had a surge recently and it destroyed an expensive fridge freezer so I would probably rather go for something by a known manufacturer.

Dedcon

This is cheap enough and a great deal if it works. However you'll only … This is cheap enough and a great deal if it works. However you'll only find out how good it actually is if you get a power surge and by then it's too late.



Exactly. The size of this alone means it can't have much more than a metal oxide varistor internally. There simply isn't enough space for many other components that you'd get in others.

For £6.75 more, you can get a Belkin: amazon.co.uk/Bel…tor

It has a Joules rating, it has power filtration, It has a €15,000 Connected Equipment Warranty (CEW), and a UK base with a phone number should you need to contact them.

I'm honestly dumbfounded on why people buy the one the OP linked. If you're attaching cheap equipment, why are you bothering with a ridiculously low end "surge protector" anyway? If you're attaching expensive equipment, why are you not spending the extra 6 odd quid and buying something from a respectable company that will protect it?

I know this is a deals site, but don't cut corners on things like this. It doesn't pay.

Would not use these on anything of value!

No details of warranty or more importantly what they will cover if your equipment gets damaged. So if you buy this and it doesnt work its as useful as having your old plug on there. If you buy a more expensive but decent one that comes with a guarantee then even if the extension fails to prevent damage you know the company will replace your equipment.

Hopefully people will see sense and this will eventually go cold.

Edited by: "mclovin9091" 30th Aug 2015

hi wonder if anyone can help. I need an extention lead that's 8m in length as my daughters room only has one socket and her TV,dvd player, sonos and lamp are at the other end. what extention lead should I get? a bog standard one or one with surge protection? I worry with extention leads and fires. I have looked around and the best I have found is £18 with surge protection from b&q. thanks

highwayman8155

This is a genuine question... How often do we get damaging surges? I … This is a genuine question... How often do we get damaging surges? I have never had anything damaged by a power surge.


In my case twice in the last year or so caused by thunderstorms.
I one case it fried a modem & Vodafone Suresignal and in the the other, a network card, a router, a single port on another router and some other stuff I can't remember.
In at least one of these cases, the surge came up the phone line rather than the power.
Oh, and in my last house a mains surge too out the motherboard in my boiler.

Lost a Panasonic dot matrix printer once in the eighties due to alleged power surge (or at least that's what the repairer said about the PSU anyway), since then nothing failed or damaged. We used to get brown outs quite a bit then the utility company re-wired the street. SO in the last 30 years I personally don't see the need for such a device.

Original Poster

nomnomnomnom

"power converter"? What? Do you even know what one of those is, because … "power converter"? What? Do you even know what one of those is, because it's not what I linked.You could just go to Amazon and look up most of the product ranges in the UK....very few have US only availability. I just checked on Amazon / Google shopping for the recommended products and found ranges for them all available in the UK. The sites I linked are all large editorial sites...you know, ones that carry a little bit of weight. Not only that, but a huge amount of tech sites are US based, so I'm not going to hunt down one with a UK base just to try and appeal to your ignorance of electronics. The information on how surges work and the protection you need against them don't change based on your country. The fact that you think I should link UK only surge protection links is laughable, given that anyone with basic electronic knowledge should be able to explain what a surge is.If you're going to be sarcastic, it helps to have a GCSE level of understanding on what you're talking about.I did not - don't presume.



Certainly a surge of input here. Thanks for the interest :-)
HAPPY SUNDAY PEEPS - and not presuming it is for everyone :-)

highwayman8155

This is a genuine question... How often do we get damaging surges? I … This is a genuine question... How often do we get damaging surges? I have never had anything damaged by a power surge.



A pharmacist I worked with many years ago had gone out shopping, she came home to find fire engines, police and ambulance outside her home. Her daughter had been in when the house had been struck by lightening. Her daughter saw the bolt go from the computer monitor (old crt I guess) that she had been sitting in front of and blow a hole through the door on the kitchen where she had some keys hanging. Lucky daughter not so lucky computer. I think I recall her saying the the surge had fried most of the stuff that had been plugged in. Fire brigade et al left leaving them sitting in a house with no power and a new air vent in the door.

nic2005

hi wonder if anyone can help. I need an extention lead that's 8m in … hi wonder if anyone can help. I need an extention lead that's 8m in length as my daughters room only has one socket and her TV,dvd player, sonos and lamp are at the other end. what extention lead should I get? a bog standard one or one with surge protection? I worry with extention leads and fires. I have looked around and the best I have found is £18 with surge protection from b&q. thanks


I suppose the answer depends on how much value you place on the connected equipment.
If the possibility of a power surge worries you, then - yes - go for a surge-protected extension from a well-known retailer (like the one you've seen at B&Q). If you feel £18 is too much to pay, I'm sure there are cheaper alternatives (I haven't looked though) from Amazon or eBay.
If, after considering all the comments above in this thread, you don't feel surge protection is necessary, then you should be able to find an 8m standard 4-, 6-, 8, or even 10-gang extension for about £10.

I suppose there handy to have but never had anything damaged by power surge......isn't that what a fuse is for anyway?

nic2005

hi wonder if anyone can help. I need an extention lead that's 8m in … hi wonder if anyone can help. I need an extention lead that's 8m in length as my daughters room only has one socket and her TV,dvd player, sonos and lamp are at the other end. what extention lead should I get? a bog standard one or one with surge protection? I worry with extention leads and fires. I have looked around and the best I have found is £18 with surge protection from b&q. thanks



Cheap (sub £7) 8M one from CPC cpc.farnell.com/pro…687 Not a clue what the quality is like.

If I want a long extension, I would normally make up my own as I like to use a flex with a good thick layer of insulation to resist damage.

With only one socket and at the wrong end of the room though, I'd fit a double socket in the wall where it is needed.

djames108

I suppose there handy to have but never had anything damaged by power … I suppose there handy to have but never had anything damaged by power surge......isn't that what a fuse is for anyway?



No. The fuse prevents the flex from melting and starting a fire if the appliance develops a fault that causes a short, or otherwise causes it to draw more current that the flex is rated for. Or if the wires in the flex itself gets shorted due to damage.

Surges are spikes in the voltage of the power supply caused by such things as motors in appliances, or anything with an inductor being switching off, or light bulbs blowing etc, or lightning, although don't expect a surge protector to be very effective against a lightning strike. Or cable thieves:- dailymail.co.uk/new…tml
Edited by: "melted" 30th Aug 2015

Graham1979

A pharmacist I worked with many years ago had gone out shopping, she came … A pharmacist I worked with many years ago had gone out shopping, she came home to find fire engines, police and ambulance outside her home. Her daughter had been in when the house had been struck by lightening. Her daughter saw the bolt go from the computer monitor (old crt I guess) that she had been sitting in front of and blow a hole through the door on the kitchen where she had some keys hanging. Lucky daughter not so lucky computer. I think I recall her saying the the surge had fried most of the stuff that had been plugged in. Fire brigade et al left leaving them sitting in a house with no power and a new air vent in the door.



​cool story, bro

jeczap

​cool story, bro


Luckily it didn't get her head. That would have been a nasty scene.

nomnomnomnom

"power converter"? What? Do you even know what one of those is, because … "power converter"? What? Do you even know what one of those is, because it's not what I linked.You could just go to Amazon and look up most of the product ranges in the UK....very few have US only availability. I just checked on Amazon / Google shopping for the recommended products and found ranges for them all available in the UK. The sites I linked are all large editorial sites...you know, ones that carry a little bit of weight. Not only that, but a huge amount of tech sites are US based, so I'm not going to hunt down one with a UK base just to try and appeal to your ignorance of electronics. The information on how surges work and the protection you need against them don't change based on your country. The fact that you think I should link UK only surge protection links is laughable, given that anyone with basic electronic knowledge should be able to explain what a surge is.If you're going to be sarcastic, it helps to have a GCSE level of understanding on what you're talking about.I did not - don't presume.



APC brand American Power Converter - geddit?

There is no point giving us links to 'the best surge protectors' for American sites when you can't get those models in the UK or if you can they are 120 volt versions, presumably sold to people about to return to the states.

I see you struggle with anything that calls into question your omnipotence. Why not hold your hands out in front of you and imagine you are holding a dove. Let all that anger, bile and misplaced rectitude flow from you into the dove. Now just imagine letting it go and watch it fly free.

Feel better now?

MINCER

There is no point giving us links to 'the best surge protectors' for … There is no point giving us links to 'the best surge protectors' for American sites when you can't get those models in the UK or if you can they are 120 volt versions, presumably sold to people about to return to the states.



Then you buy the nearest equivalent UK 230v version....The internals are still more or less identical. I'd have thought anyone with access to a wall socket could have figured that one out...
The 'best surge protectors' covered more than just one though. It explained a lot about surge protectors and covered some of the questions in this thread, such as "do I need one?". Information which was undoubtedly useful to people who had questions.

Very strange how you've got so hooked on the US thing, given that you can find the UK equivalent of most of these protectors (or near enough) easily. It's the information in the articles that was important, and what people can take away from it, but yet again this place has diverged from a possible technical discussion on why you shouldn't buy a £2 "surge protector" to arguing about irrelevant things, such as US vs UK links to a product range.

If people can navigate and use HUKD, I'm confident they can take the information from these sites such as respected brands, ranges, and what to avoid and apply it to their UK purchase. More so given that you'd really have to go out of your way to order the US version.

Original Poster

nomnomnomnom

Then you buy the nearest equivalent UK 230v version....The internals are … Then you buy the nearest equivalent UK 230v version....The internals are still more or less identical. I'd have thought anyone with access to a wall socket could have figured that one out...The 'best surge protectors' covered more than just one though. It explained a lot about surge protectors and covered some of the questions in this thread, such as "do I need one?". Information which was undoubtedly useful to people who had questions.Very strange how you've got so hooked on the US thing, given that you can find the UK equivalent of most of these protectors (or near enough) easily. It's the information in the articles that was important, and what people can take away from it, but yet again this place has diverged from a possible technical discussion on why you shouldn't buy a £2 "surge protector" to arguing about irrelevant things, such as US vs UK links to a product range.If people can navigate and use HUKD, I'm confident they can take the information from these sites such as respected brands, ranges, and what to avoid and apply it to their UK purchase. More so given that you'd really have to go out of your way to order the US version.



Please please let us know why the nation should not buy a £2 surge protector and give technical facts about the product you wish to rebuff. Share the wisdom, it's important.

Graham1979

A pharmacist I worked with many years ago had gone out shopping, she came … A pharmacist I worked with many years ago had gone out shopping, she came home to find fire engines, police and ambulance outside her home. Her daughter had been in when the house had been struck by lightening. Her daughter saw the bolt go from the computer monitor (old crt I guess) that she had been sitting in front of and blow a hole through the door on the kitchen where she had some keys hanging. Lucky daughter not so lucky computer. I think I recall her saying the the surge had fried most of the stuff that had been plugged in. Fire brigade et al left leaving them sitting in a house with no power and a new air vent in the door.



Could you please post a deal for an item that would prevent me from having a hole blown through my door by a lightning bolt please?

nic2005

hi wonder if anyone can help. I need an extention lead that's 8m in … hi wonder if anyone can help. I need an extention lead that's 8m in length as my daughters room only has one socket and her TV,dvd player, sonos and lamp are at the other end. what extention lead should I get? a bog standard one or one with surge protection? I worry with extention leads and fires. I have looked around and the best I have found is £18 with surge protection from b&q. thanks



Bog standard is fine, no point in surge sockets!

omg the pain of posting a deal on here only for a person who thinks there the worlds greatest expert on your item.
We see a deal we post it hoping we might save somebody money.....:(

marnstars

Please please let us know why the nation should not buy a £2 surge … Please please let us know why the nation should not buy a £2 surge protector and give technical facts about the product you wish to rebuff. Share the wisdom, it's important.



Did you miss the bit where no said "It has no joule ratings, no testing information, no equipment warranty...."?

Surely it should be for them to prove why it is any good... or are one of the people that believes everything that a sales person says an item can do, and that theirs is better than everyone elses

Edited by: "droitwichdosser" 31st Aug 2015

cheesybeanzz74

omg the pain of posting a deal on here only for a person who thinks there … omg the pain of posting a deal on here only for a person who thinks there the worlds greatest expert on your item.We see a deal we post it hoping we might save somebody money.....:(




He didn't claim to be the worlds leading expert. But he did link to some very big sites with lots of useful information that probably did have experts doing tests for them

nomnomnomnom

Then you buy the nearest equivalent UK 230v version....The internals are … Then you buy the nearest equivalent UK 230v version....The internals are still more or less identical. I'd have thought anyone with access to a wall socket could have figured that one out...The 'best surge protectors' covered more than just one though. It explained a lot about surge protectors and covered some of the questions in this thread, such as "do I need one?". Information which was undoubtedly useful to people who had questions.Very strange how you've got so hooked on the US thing, given that you can find the UK equivalent of most of these protectors (or near enough) easily. It's the information in the articles that was important, and what people can take away from it, but yet again this place has diverged from a possible technical discussion on why you shouldn't buy a £2 "surge protector" to arguing about irrelevant things, such as US vs UK links to a product range.If people can navigate and use HUKD, I'm confident they can take the information from these sites such as respected brands, ranges, and what to avoid and apply it to their UK purchase. More so given that you'd really have to go out of your way to order the US version.



Let it go, let it go
Can't hold it back anymore
Let it go, let it go
Turn away and slam the door!

omgpleasespamme

Could you please post a deal for an item that would prevent me from … Could you please post a deal for an item that would prevent me from having a hole blown through my door by a lightning bolt please?


You probably need to live inside a sealed tin shed for that level of gauranteed lightning protection, earthed of course.
http://www.greatdreams.com/metal_shed.jpg

These lot must have been using one, their lights all survived.


http://files.sharenator.com/lightning-strikes-the-vatican-s634x815-413985.jpg

Original Poster

droitwichdosser

Did you miss the bit where no said "It has no joule ratings, no testing … Did you miss the bit where no said "It has no joule ratings, no testing information, no equipment warranty...."?Surely it should be for them to prove why it is any good... or are one of the people that believes everything that a sales person says an item can do, and that theirs is better than everyone elses



Morning all. Cheers for your response.

Just to clarify on your points my friend and the posters point of "Stop wasting your money on this tat thinking it'll protect you." (nomnomnomnom)

1. It has no joules rating. Doesn't mean it doesn't have one. My query to the poster was around defining why this is a bad device if he/she can'take definitively tell me what the joules rating is, why it is important and how it compares to other available devices and especially against the recommended alternative? Fair question I thought to some one who rebuffed a product and pretty much the manufacturer, the seller, the OP and other fellow HUKDers.
2. No testing information. As far as I can see on the Belkin item the poster offered as an alternative has no testing information provided on the amazon page (as far as I can see). What testing information should we look for? It also has a lower joules rating compared to its relative counterparts from Belkin as reviewed in the comparison of products further down on the Amazon Web page provided. Does that make the alternative offered up inferior too if that joules rating is that key measure?
3. No equipment warranty. Just reading one of the posters sources of information on CNET and it suggests "not that they have or would ever payout" My thought....can you imagine trying to prove a valid claim! Or, could you be paying £6.75 more for a Belkin that provides no more protection than the OP, but paying for insurance levels etc from a recognised brand and retailer? Genuine question.

It was the point of making a direct comparison to another product without being able to product comparison facts. Happy to take on the advice from someone with knowledge. My presence here as the OP was the provide a deal to the nation on a forum set up to provide deals for the nation. If someone goes as far as to rebuff this as not being a deal with opinion and an absence of facts about the product requires fair and reasonable challenge to their comments.

In summary. The only way to compare this to market is to provide the evidence of inferiority. I'd be happy as the OP have my post challenged on the basis of cheaper elsewhere or indeed from a point of knowledge or experience/expertise that provides credible advice to fellow HUKDers.

It's the pain as a poster of a deal on here to find yourself challenged on a product that from a UK seller that you list in good faith as being listed by the seller (not the OP) as fit for purpose. I'm open to theveryone fact that this (op) may be inferior to the Belkin. But without the evidence against that comparable product it could remain open to question whether it could indeed be better too. Hence my original question and me not missing any points.

Surely CPC/Pro Elec or Belkin feels a bit like Onkyo or Sony without comparison of brands and not facts in this case. The second bit of your point...."Surely it should be for them to prove why it is any good..." is the point of my question too. I merely posted a deal in good faith/fit for defined purpose of the retailer & manufacturer. It would have been wrong of me to suggest this was best in market etc without having evidence to back that up and any such claim I could have made would therefore have been false.

Still a question (or multiples of ) in respect of either nomnomnomnom's expertise or just opinion in respect his statement of "Stop wasting your money on this tat thinking it'll protect you."

Cheers.

Edited by: "marnstars" 31st Aug 2015

Original Poster

droitwichdosser

He didn't claim to be the worlds leading expert. But he did link to some … He didn't claim to be the worlds leading expert. But he did link to some very big sites with lots of useful information that probably did have experts doing tests for them



Perhaps he engaged and continued to do so with at least a perception to others as being the leading authority within this thread.

Now over engagement from me as the OP. Off for lunch and cheezybeanzz on toast it is. I'll even count out 74 of them! Indeed the pain of posting a deal on here sometimes! Cheers for support buddy. :-)

A couple of questions to any techy. Does this work in the same way as those plug in devices that cut the supply if you cut into your mower cable? Is there any adverse affect by connecting it to a multi plug? As I am not familiar with Pro Elec do they have the same quality control over manufacture as say Belkin?
Having seen the affects of cheap mobile phone chargers over branded chargers on " Fake Britain " I would only buy known branded electrical products. Exploding charger badly burnt and scarred little girls hand.

omgpleasespamme

Could you please post a deal for an item that would prevent me from … Could you please post a deal for an item that would prevent me from having a hole blown through my door by a lightning bolt please?



http://www.forgottenoh.com/Moonville/tunnel2.jpg No doors to blow off, not sure how much this tunnel is but you might get quidco!
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