Corratec Dolomiti 105 Road bike - Massive Spec for £619 delivered @ CRC
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Corratec Dolomiti 105 Road bike - Massive Spec for £619 delivered @ CRC

36
Found 12th Aug 2013
I dont think any other bike can match this quality or spec, at this price point.. Shimano 105 all over the place, less than 9 kilos too.

Great review too.

CRC has an automatic tenner off orders over £75, so it should come in at £619. Dont forget quidco for a few extra percent too.

bikeradar.com/gea…031

36 Comments

Hot from me

Banned

I blame Wiggle

Original Poster

very brief video of a white version with different wheels here. youtube.com/wat…yer

Looks pretty good for the money.

I have the Merida Race Lite 900 which is light aluminum frame and has carbon forks and is only £599. Cracking bike!

1k was over the top though !! For this bike
Edited by: "logohigh" 13th Aug 2013

jonnybravo

Looks pretty good for the money.I have the Merida Race Lite 900 which is … Looks pretty good for the money.I have the Merida Race Lite 900 which is light aluminum frame and has carbon forks and is only £599. Cracking bike!

£540 here wheelies.co.uk/p55…spx is that a deal worth posting? I may do so

Siguros

£540 here … £540 here http://www.wheelies.co.uk/p55257/Merida-Race-Lite-900-2013-Road-Bike.aspx is that a deal worth posting? I may do so



Really bad gears on the one you posted. For £80 more this is a far better deal. Heat added
Edited by: "alexytin" 13th Aug 2013

Really bad gears? Dont be so harsh, nothing wrong with Shimano 2300 even if they are the brands entry level gearing.

You are spot on about Value for money though as far as the gears are concerned.

2300 - Entry Level
Sora
Tiagra
105
Ultegra
Dura Ace - Expensive

As you can see 105 is quite a bit higher up in the cost spectrum, so value for money on the gearing side of things this is a cracking price.

Good thing about CRC is they'll sell you a bike at sale price + 10% on C2W scheme for even bigger savings.

Too many bike sellers won't do discount + C2W.

sancho_uk

Really bad gears? Dont be so harsh, nothing wrong with Shimano 2300 even … Really bad gears? Dont be so harsh, nothing wrong with Shimano 2300 even if they are the brands entry level gearing.You are spot on about Value for money though as far as the gears are concerned.2300 - Entry LevelSoraTiagra105UltegraDura Ace - ExpensiveAs you can see 105 is quite a bit higher up in the cost spectrum, so value for money on the gearing side of things this is a cracking price.

Didn't know that about the gears, they are so confusing but thanks!

Original Poster

Shimano 105 groupset is 392 quid to buy alone. Although this has the tiagra crank and their own brakes, but its probably a good 300+ quids worth of groupset on it,

Hot!! I just can't get used to the usual road bike riding position so I'm sticking with my hybrid, but this would be an excellent bike - almost tempting to get one "just in case"...

sledwich

Nice bike: found it here but I always think if something looks too good … Nice bike: found it here but I always think if something looks too good to be true it probably is: Cycle Hunting 2013 Corratec Dolomiti 105 Limited Edition Road BikeShipping 235.41! Wish I lived in the states.


That's a dumb comparison - you have to add sales tax.

I have recently purchased the red Triban 3 from Decathlon and after a few weeks I am regretting not investing more in a road bike...the Shimano 2300 gearing is probably the worst thing about the Triban and this bike with 105 gearing as this price is a steal....my advice is to invest the max to get decent gearing as that will add so much more enjoyment to the riding experience.

I'm looking at getting my 4 yr old his first proper bike.

Can any of you bikey type people (of which I used to be one before getting planted into the tarmac one day) advise what online retailers are trustworthy - or am I as well sticking to Halfords given what I'm after?

Original Poster

moob

I'm looking at getting my 4 yr old his first proper bike.Can any of you … I'm looking at getting my 4 yr old his first proper bike.Can any of you bikey type people (of which I used to be one before getting planted into the tarmac one day) advise what online retailers are trustworthy - or am I as well sticking to Halfords given what I'm after?

. wiggle, chain reaction cycles, decathlon, pro bike kit and bike discount.de. for a 4 year old I would recommend: either a 14 or 16 inch wheeled bike. good bikes would be: specialized hotrock, merida Dakar, ridgeback MX16, or, an islabike. the Islabike will keep its value the best, the others will lose about 60 percent of their value. worth scanning gumtree or classified ads for any of those you won't go wrong. if he can't ride a bike already. take the pedals off and seat down as low as poss. use it as a balance bike at first. then, once he's mastered that, pedals back on and off they go.

xchaotic

That's a dumb comparison - you have to add sales tax.



Thanks - I will bear that in mind, although I think the point I was making was it was cheaper in the states, hence the last comment.

great deal from what i can read on here

Guys, Something I've often wondered:
To a pootling around for fitness cyclist like myself - could someone just explain quickly why a commercially shop bought available bike can cost upwards of £3k. I can understand that technology and precision cost but there must be limit to what can be achieved with what is basically some tube work and cogs. Don't you reach a point of diminishing return at a much lower cost than £3k? Does the extra £2k really make a difference to a non-pro?
Genuine question honest - not trolling. Interested to know.

Probably worth pointing out this bike DOESN'T have a 105 groupset.

It's a mix of 105 and Tiagra, obviously mixing components allows them to brand it as 105 but in reality you're not getting full 105.

moob

I'm looking at getting my 4 yr old his first proper bike.Can any of you … I'm looking at getting my 4 yr old his first proper bike.Can any of you bikey type people (of which I used to be one before getting planted into the tarmac one day) advise what online retailers are trustworthy - or am I as well sticking to Halfords given what I'm after?



I'd say get an Isla bike.

They're a bit more expensive than the stuff at halfords but they hold their value and are much better bikes to learn on.

One key thing with bikes for kids is weight, imagine if you had a bike that weighed nearly 30-50% of your body weight, that's what most crappy cheapo steel framed bikes for kids are like, it's no wonder they struggle to ride them as, once they start to wobble, the momentum is too much to compensate.

You can buy an Isla bike and sell it for ~90% of what you paid in a couple of years, have a look on eBay at used prices.

Good luck!

Edited by: "LouO" 13th Aug 2013

Xippi

Guys, Something I've often wondered:To a pootling around for fitness … Guys, Something I've often wondered:To a pootling around for fitness cyclist like myself - could someone just explain quickly why a commercially shop bought available bike can cost upwards of £3k. I can understand that technology and precision cost but there must be limit to what can be achieved with what is basically some tube work and cogs. Don't you reach a point of diminishing return at a much lower cost than £3k? Does the extra £2k really make a difference to a non-pro?Genuine question honest - not trolling. Interested to know.



now it wont make any real difference to you if you are of an average standard, you pay for weight, durability, electronic gearing, internal cable routing etc..

Xippi

Guys, Something I've often wondered:To a pootling around for fitness … Guys, Something I've often wondered:To a pootling around for fitness cyclist like myself - could someone just explain quickly why a commercially shop bought available bike can cost upwards of £3k. I can understand that technology and precision cost but there must be limit to what can be achieved with what is basically some tube work and cogs. Don't you reach a point of diminishing return at a much lower cost than £3k? Does the extra £2k really make a difference to a non-pro?Genuine question honest - not trolling. Interested to know.



Not much I would say. To really benefit from a 3k bike (not that owing & rediing one would'nt be nice) I would think you would need to be competing at a pretty high level. Just my opinion. I believe its a bit like top end hi-fi; yes there's a diference but not that much but if you have the money then why not?

Original Poster

Xippi

Guys, Something I've often wondered:To a pootling around for fitness … Guys, Something I've often wondered:To a pootling around for fitness cyclist like myself - could someone just explain quickly why a commercially shop bought available bike can cost upwards of £3k. I can understand that technology and precision cost but there must be limit to what can be achieved with what is basically some tube work and cogs. Don't you reach a point of diminishing return at a much lower cost than £3k? Does the extra £2k really make a difference to a non-pro?Genuine question honest - not trolling. Interested to know.

yeah, I agree with the others. you would probably notice the difference between a thousand pound bike and a three thousand pound bike, only if you are regularly getting top ten positions on strava. as a beginner, stick with the thousand pound bike, but try and get the best frame, wheels and gears for the Money. a thousand pound bike will weigh about 9 kilos. a three thousand pound bike should be 7.5 kilos. So don't eat as many burgers, and you will save two grand. at the end of the day, its the rider, not the bike. No point in a three grand bike with a 3 pound rider on it. its also great fun, if you are a good rider on a cheaper bike to blow away expensive bikes. for example, my cannondale caad 8 has sora gears and cost me 400 quid second hand, but I've been riding for a few years now, averaging 130 miles per week, and can keep up with most bikes I see out and about on my commute to work. I can get KOMs on strava on it, and loads of top tens, so concentrate on getting good first before splashing out.

LouO

I'd say get an Isla bike.They're a bit more expensive than the stuff at … I'd say get an Isla bike.They're a bit more expensive than the stuff at halfords but they hold their value and are much better bikes to learn on.One key thing with bikes for kids is weight, imagine if you had a bike that weighed nearly 30-50% of your body weight, that's what most crappy cheapo steel framed bikes for kids are like, it's no wonder they struggle to ride them as, once they start to wobble, the momentum is too much to compensate.You can buy an Isla bike and sell it for ~90% of what you paid in a couple of years, have a look on eBay at used prices. Good luck!


Thanks. I find 200 quid a bit much for a 4 yr olds bike.

Sure, weight and resale value have an input, but I managed when I was little to ride a typical, cheapo steel frame.

Cheers anyway.

Original Poster

moob

Thanks. I find 200 quid a bit much for a 4 yr olds bike.Sure, weight and … Thanks. I find 200 quid a bit much for a 4 yr olds bike.Sure, weight and resale value have an input, but I managed when I was little to ride a typical, cheapo steel frame.Cheers anyway.

. If you are lucky you will find the other bikes I mentioned second hand, for between 40 and 80 pounds, (not the islabike). You will be able to sell them on for what you paid, pretty much. They depreciate from new but then keep their value.
Edited by: "Judosteffer" 13th Aug 2013

The ordinary rider will not get any benefit from a 3K bike over a 1K bike.Every bike has to weigh 25 lbs the lighter the bike the heavier the lock and chain to keep the thing.

moob

I'm looking at getting my 4 yr old his first proper bike.Can any of you … I'm looking at getting my 4 yr old his first proper bike.Can any of you bikey type people (of which I used to be one before getting planted into the tarmac one day) advise what online retailers are trustworthy - or am I as well sticking to Halfords given what I'm after?



Wiggle, Je James, winstanley bikes, Chain reaction, evans etc etc

The difference between spending a bit of money on a bike and a lot of money on a bike is night and day from my experience anyway...

However there is an element of "fashion" when it comes to cycling. If you imagine the bikes are clothing manufacturers for instance you will pick up a less known brand a lot cheaper than an expensive brand..

IF you ride enough though even as an amateur you will notice the difference. I have 2 bikes one for the winter and one for Sunday best. One was £300 and the other £1600.

The gains are marginal e.g a couple of kilometres an hour added to your average, but when you are sat in the saddle for 5/6 hours those couple of k`s per hour make a massive difference!

Also the biggest jump up in price is going from Steel/Alu to a good Carbon Fibre compound and this is where the price rockets. Again spending the day in the saddle from my experience the Carbon soaks up the bumps in our UK roads a lot better than the other materials.

So yes there is an element of you may not need it and it may not be for you, but not noticing the difference by spending more im not overly convinced. When you get to the £3k mark you will be looking at a 7kg bike which will be a lot quicker up hills when compared to a 9kg bike thats half the price? Its basically the equivalent of carrying a sack of spuds everywhere you go with you.

Again this is just my opinion from experience of both inexpensive and expensive bikes alike!

I would go for this, but my work only processes Cycle Plus / Cycle2Workstuff in October, it's going to be a long wait!

sancho_uk

The difference between spending a bit of money on a bike and a lot of … The difference between spending a bit of money on a bike and a lot of money on a bike is night and day from my experience anyway...However there is an element of "fashion" when it comes to cycling. If you imagine the bikes are clothing manufacturers for instance you will pick up a less known brand a lot cheaper than an expensive brand..IF you ride enough though even as an amateur you will notice the difference. I have 2 bikes one for the winter and one for Sunday best. One was £300 and the other £1600.The gains are marginal e.g a couple of kilometres an hour added to your average, but when you are sat in the saddle for 5/6 hours those couple of k`s per hour make a massive difference!Also the biggest jump up in price is going from Steel/Alu to a good Carbon Fibre compound and this is where the price rockets. Again spending the day in the saddle from my experience the Carbon soaks up the bumps in our UK roads a lot better than the other materials.So yes there is an element of you may not need it and it may not be for you, but not noticing the difference by spending more im not overly convinced. When you get to the £3k mark you will be looking at a 7kg bike which will be a lot quicker up hills when compared to a 9kg bike thats half the price? Its basically the equivalent of carrying a sack of spuds everywhere you go with you.Again this is just my opinion from experience of both inexpensive and expensive bikes alike!



But surely the rider would need to get down to a competition weight first - 2kg can be saved by the rider only shedding 5lbs...I certainly need to lose 5/6lbs..

Big difference between 1.6k and 3Kg...

afroylnt

But surely the rider would need to get down to a competition weight first … But surely the rider would need to get down to a competition weight first - 2kg can be saved by the rider only shedding 5lbs...I certainly need to lose 5/6lbs..Big difference between 1.6k and 3Kg...



Of course you are right, but that wasnt the question was it?

The question was whats the difference when spending a lot of money on a bike? It goes without saying the fitter the person riding the bike is the quicker it will go.

The rider is the engine when riding a bike so this is where the most gains can be had.

I did say anything to do with the bike itself the gains would be "marginal", but when you get to the point where you probably want to drop this much money on a bike those marginal gains are worth their weight in gold.

Xippi

Guys, Something I've often wondered:To a pootling around for fitness … Guys, Something I've often wondered:To a pootling around for fitness cyclist like myself - could someone just explain quickly why a commercially shop bought available bike can cost upwards of £3k. I can understand that technology and precision cost but there must be limit to what can be achieved with what is basically some tube work and cogs. Don't you reach a point of diminishing return at a much lower cost than £3k? Does the extra £2k really make a difference to a non-pro?Genuine question honest - not trolling. Interested to know.



Quick explanation: - They don't sell many. You are welcome.

sancho_uk

Of course you are right, but that wasnt the question was it?The question … Of course you are right, but that wasnt the question was it?The question was whats the difference when spending a lot of money on a bike? It goes without saying the fitter the person riding the bike is the quicker it will go.The rider is the engine when riding a bike so this is where the most gains can be had.I did say anything to do with the bike itself the gains would be "marginal", but when you get to the point where you probably want to drop this much money on a bike those marginal gains are worth their weight in gold.



I would love to see a pro rider, a good amateur competition rider, a good club cyclist all trying out bikes costing between £750 to £5000 over a one hour course with hills to really see how much time you can save for the extra £££'s - I personally suspect its very little.

Its pretty much a marketing con; but I think most people know that and just find any reason to spend loads on a bike - basically because they have the money and they want to. Nothing wrong with this.

afroylnt

I would love to see a pro rider, a good amateur competition rider, a good … I would love to see a pro rider, a good amateur competition rider, a good club cyclist all trying out bikes costing between £750 to £5000 over a one hour course with hills to really see how much time you can save for the extra £££'s - I personally suspect its very little.Its pretty much a marketing con; but I think most people know that and just find any reason to spend loads on a bike - basically because they have the money and they want to. Nothing wrong with this.



Again you are right the gains would be "very little".

It all depends on how serious / competitive you are. The difference between a race win and coming 2nd, 3rd, 4th is often very little and the marginal gains can be the difference.

For 99% of riders though you are bang on the money and the gains are so marginal there is probably no need to destroy your bank account. That said and again mirroring what you said if you have the money and thats your hobby why not!
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