Corsair 16GB (2x8GB) White Vengeance LPX DDR4 3000MHz Memory - £69.49 @ Aria PC
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Corsair 16GB (2x8GB) White Vengeance LPX DDR4 3000MHz Memory - £69.49 @ Aria PC

£69.49£79.9913%Aria PC Deals
14
Posted 10th Jun
£ 56.25 + £1.66 For delivery.


Cheap RAM for those all white builds
Community Updates
VENGEANCE LPX memory is designed for high-performance overclocking. The heat spreader is made of pure aluminium for faster heat dissipation, and the custom performance PCB helps manage heat and provides superior overclocking headroom. Each IC is individually screened for performance potential.

The DDR4 form factor is optimized for the latest Intel® and AMD DDR4 Series motherboards and offers higher frequencies, greater bandwidth, and lower power consumption than DDR3 modules. VENGEANCE LPX DDR4 modules are compatibility-tested across Intel® and AMD DDR4 Series motherboards for reliably fast performance. There is XMP 2.0 support for trouble-free automatic overclocking. In addition, they are available in multiple colours to match your motherboard, your components, or just your style. Features Designed for High-Performance Overclocking
Each VENGEANCE LPX module is built with a pure aluminium heat spreader for faster heat dissipation and cooler operation; and the custom performance PCB helps manage heat and provides superior overclocking headroom.

Each IC is individually screened for performance potential.

Designed for Great Looks
Available in multiple colours to match your motherboard, your components, or just your style.

Performance and Compatibility
VENGEANCE LPX is optimized and compatibility tested for the latest Intel® and AMD DDR4 Series motherboards and offers higher frequencies, greater bandwidth, and lower power consumption.

XMP 2.0 support for trouble-free automatic overclocking.

Low-Profile Heat Spreader Design
The VENGEANCE LPX module height is carefully designed to fit smaller spaces.
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14 Comments
Very good price. 3000MHz too!
NICE!!! Getting closer to the £55 mark I paid for the same set just over two years ago.

hot hot hot!
It's splashed all over these that vengeance is designed for overclocking but is it actually feasible on these? I've got this kit and run xmp which puts it at 2933mhz. Don't particularly see a point in stress testing and overclocking since I figured it might end up at like 3100mhz at best. So virtually no improvement whatsoever. Can anyone shed any light? Thanks
mreriksen10/06/2019 19:13

NICE!!! Getting closer to the £55 mark I paid for the same set just over …NICE!!! Getting closer to the £55 mark I paid for the same set just over two years ago.hot hot hot!


It's marketing spin. Technically the official speed of all DDR4 is 2133Mhz. All higher speeds are regarded as an overclock, even if the manufacturer made the RAM to intentionally support it.

It's why the RAM only runs at 2133 unless you enable the XMP.
Spectral11/06/2019 21:37

It's marketing spin. Technically the official speed of all DDR4 is …It's marketing spin. Technically the official speed of all DDR4 is 2133Mhz. All higher speeds are regarded as an overclock, even if the manufacturer made the RAM to intentionally support it.It's why the RAM only runs at 2133 unless you enable the XMP.


DDR4 must run at 1600Mhz to be considered DDR4 as a minimum, but that doesn't mean anything above it is an overclock these days.

JEDEC officially recognise up to 3200 with the specifications: DDR4-3200W, DDR4-3200AA and DDR4-3200AC. They supply timings for what they consider to be valid in the SPD on their specification sheets too.

The 2133Mhz 'official speed' hasn't been the case for a number of years.
Edited by: "nomnomnomnom" 11th Jun
nomnomnomnom11/06/2019 22:21

DDR4 must run at 1600Mhz to be considered DDR4 as a minimum, but that …DDR4 must run at 1600Mhz to be considered DDR4 as a minimum, but that doesn't mean anything above it is an overclock these days.JEDEC officially recognise up to 3200 with the specifications: DDR4-3200W, DDR4-3200AA and DDR4-3200AC. They supply timings for what they consider to be valid in the SPD on their specification sheets too.The 2133Mhz 'official speed' hasn't been the case for a number of years.


However in reality its still in place, it's the default speed unless you manually change it and all the marketing is all from when it was the case. It's even in the blurb "XMP 2.0 support for trouble-free automatic overclocking.". They consider the XMP speed an overclock.

I do admit I wasn't aware it had changed though.
Edited by: "Spectral" 11th Jun
Spectral11/06/2019 22:25

However in reality its still in place, it's the default speed unless you …However in reality its still in place, it's the default speed unless you manually change it and all the marketing is all from when it was the case.I do admit I wasn't aware it had changed though.



This shouldn't be the case on a modern CPU / Motherboard - it's terrible if they're doing this.

For example I've just built 2 Coffee Lake systems. The RAM was set at 2666 automatically on both - which is the maximum the CPU officially supports. As long as the RAM supports 2666 or higher and is sold as such, it must have the timings for that speed in the SPD table. If it doesn't, it will fail JEDEC validation.

Now I'm certainly not suggesting there are motherboards out there that don't do this, but it's really bad of them if that's the case. Heck, it sounds like a bug, as 1600Mhz is no more valid than any other higher speed in the SPD table.

Going over 2666 requires manual changes for sure though, as that's the offical CPU limit.

You've got me curious though! I have a Kaby Lake system upstairs, which should be limited to 2400 officially due to the CPU. I'll see what the BIOS sets it as later by default. I wonder how widespread that issue is?
nomnomnomnom11/06/2019 22:41

This shouldn't be the case on a modern CPU / Motherboard - it's terrible …This shouldn't be the case on a modern CPU / Motherboard - it's terrible if they're doing this.For example I've just built 2 Coffee Lake systems. The RAM was set at 2666 automatically on both - which is the maximum the CPU officially supports. As long as the RAM supports 2666 or higher and is sold as such, it must have the timings for that speed in the SPD table. If it doesn't, it will fail JEDEC validation.Now I'm certainly not suggesting there are motherboards out there that don't do this, but it's really bad of them if that's the case. Heck, it sounds like a bug, as 1600Mhz is no more valid than any other higher speed in the SPD table.Going over 2666 requires manual changes for sure though, as that's the offical CPU limit.You've got me curious though! I have a Kaby Lake system upstairs, which should be limited to 2400 officially due to the CPU. I'll see what the BIOS sets it as later by default. I wonder how widespread that issue is?


Last two systems I've helped people set up didn't set ram to full speed automatically, had to change it in the bios. Both were Asus ROG motherboards, one Ryzen and the other 8th gen Intel. It's a pretty common issue, I bet there's thousands of people out there not using RAM at it's max/rated frequency.

Just one of those things that if you don't know it you don't know to check.
Spectral11/06/2019 21:37

It's marketing spin. Technically the official speed of all DDR4 is …It's marketing spin. Technically the official speed of all DDR4 is 2133Mhz. All higher speeds are regarded as an overclock, even if the manufacturer made the RAM to intentionally support it.It's why the RAM only runs at 2133 unless you enable the XMP.


Where did you make that up from?
coony11/06/2019 23:05

Where did you make that up from?


From the original spec for DDR4, before it was apparently updated.

@nomnomnomnom Just been reading up and you were right, the specs were updated in 2017. Last system I built was a skylake in late 2016, not paid much attention since then, so my info was obviously out of date.

However there is still some truth the it being marketing blurb as a lot of the ram still available predate the change, these ones definitely do as I have them in my skylake system.
Edited by: "Spectral" 11th Jun
bbfb12311/06/2019 21:09

It's splashed all over these that vengeance is designed for overclocking …It's splashed all over these that vengeance is designed for overclocking but is it actually feasible on these? I've got this kit and run xmp which puts it at 2933mhz. Don't particularly see a point in stress testing and overclocking since I figured it might end up at like 3100mhz at best. So virtually no improvement whatsoever. Can anyone shed any light? Thanks


I have this set and stuck them on 3200 effortlessly. Your results may vary depending on your MB etc.. I have a mini-ITX B450 Gaming build. I wacked them back on 3000 though because like you say, no real benefit except 1 extra fps in some games. Same reason I haven't messed with the timings... I'm sure I could tighten them, but for what real-world benefit? With a ITX build I'd rather have a balanced system running cool and efficiently than something running right on the edge all the time... just unessesary stress and heat on the components.
I love cheese
Racist. Where's the deal for the black versions?
M1sterDeeds12/06/2019 16:50

Racist. Where's the deal for the black versions?


think someone put it up, i thought i saw it but there is a deal on the 16gb 3000mhz black lol
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