Coyote Electric folding bike for £405 at Halfords using code EXTRA10BIKES (was £500).  Surprisingly good reviews and high street store backup if needed.
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Coyote Electric folding bike for £405 at Halfords using code EXTRA10BIKES (was £500). Surprisingly good reviews and high street store backup if needed.

62
Found 17th Apr
Just browsing the bikes in Halfords and noticed this folding electric bike at a remarkably low price. Looked at the reviews expecting some sad comedy moments but no - 77 reviews and almost everyone very happy! I wouldn't normally recommend really cheap bikes but that alone gave me confidence to post it. At this price it's got to be worth a look if you're shopping for something similar.

Alloy frame, Shimano 6 speed, mudguards, luggage rack, 20" wheels, Kenda tyres.

Up to 20 miles range between charges.

If you normally take the car to work or shopping because it's just a bit too far to cycle or has steep hills maybe a bit of electric assistance could make the difference and add a little bit of exercise too? At a realistic true cost of 50p/mile to run a modest car this bike could very soon pay for itself!

It's not something you're going to want to carry far when it's folded (few folders are, even non-electric) but it looks like it's great for a commute and folds to store at each end or in the car boot (or caravan or boat).

There are cheap ebikes out there from on-line box shifters but good luck if you don't like it or, heaven forbid, have a problem. Halfords gets mixed feedback as a bike store (ie some good, some not) but at least there's somewhere to get it set up, sorted or return it if you have an issue. Reviews suggest you'll be happy though!

Free in-store assembly and set-up or free delivery. Free service at Halfords after 6 weeks and 1 year warranty with somewhere to take it if necessary.

I paid more than this for my non-electric folding Dahon!

Yes, of course this is lower end stuff and there are better e-bikes out there but most are at least double this price and many much, much more.

Was £500, currently £50 off but apply code EXTRA10BIKES for a further 10% off. Still £499.95 at Amazon and they won't set it up for you or provide servicing and repairs!

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One of the good things about this bike is in the future when either the motor has failed or the battery is end of life with very low charge capacity maybe 3-5 years you can remove the battery and electric fittings and change to a standard 20" front wheel (cheap) and its back to being a normal folding bike which can be used for many years beyond that. So its not an e-bike that needs to be scrapped when the electric parts no longer function.

Note the bike has no handlebar stem height adjustment so this is only really suitable for people of average height for women and slightly below average for men unless you buy an additional handlebar stem with height adjustment perhaps another £30 for the stem from ebay or aliexpress. Many people like folding bikes because one bike can fit all and be used by a whole family of different heights and easily stored in a flat etc the current configuration limits the range of sizes.

Another advantage of this bike is the motor is on the front wheel. Generally you are more likely to have a puncture on the rear wheel than front wheel due to most of the rider weight being at the back. Often e-bike motors make it more time consuming to remove the wheel to fix the puncture so the advantage here is it will be simpler and more easy to fix punctures on the rear wheel. Worth considering fitting Tannus airless tyres.

One of the best e-bikes for quality components and low pricing is the Carrera Crosscity so if you are checking out this model worth checking that model incase you feel like the extra money is justified. A huge amount of advantages to its design for admittedly £185 more with the discount.

This bike is 24V x 8.8Ah which is 211.2Wh (watt hours) which compares to 36V x 8.7Ah = 313.2Wh for the Carrera Crosscity roughly a 50% increase on that bike. Also Carrera claim it has Panasonic cells which might have a lifespan advantage. You can expect roughly 500 full charges as a minimum before capacity starts to noticeably reduce. Frequent users who commute on the bike everyday and charge for both legs of the journey to work may get little over a year, most riders will get many years.
You can get 8% off Halfords e-vouchers here ZEEK WEBSITE to use instore to pay for your bike when you opt for collection at Halfords. You also get an immediate £5 off £45 spend on your first purchase of vouchers. I did this without any hassle and my vouchers arrived to my email within minutes.
62 Comments
Some more info from the Amazon product page for this :

  • Frame: Aluminium mono curve folding frame with low step over. Fork: Hi-Tensile forks. Gears: Shimano 6 speed ,Shimano Tourney twist shifter. Drive train :Single chain set with 48 tooth chain ring and 170mm alloy cranks.14/28.
  • Drive train :Single chain set with 48 tooth chain ring and 170mm alloy cranks.14/28 Shimano freewheel. Shimano rear derailleur. Sealed cassette cartridge bottom bracket.
  • 20" Alloy black 36 hole rims with alloy hubs and 13g spokes. CNC braking surfaces. Tyre/Tubes : 20" x 1.75" Black Kenda City wall tyres with red line trim. Inner tubes come with anti puncture sealant.
  • Bars/Stem : Alloy riser 600mm handlebars with a folding alloy adjustable stem. Saddle/Seat post: Velo Royal Comfort elastomer saddle with Black alloy seat post. Lockable 24V-8.8AH Lithium ion battery.
  • 20 Miles assisted range (Dependent up on load and terrain). Weight (approx): 20 Kg. Frame Size: 15".

Another site says weight with battery is 18.5KG.
Edited by: "lazyfatboy" 17th Apr
One of the good things about this bike is in the future when either the motor has failed or the battery is end of life with very low charge capacity maybe 3-5 years you can remove the battery and electric fittings and change to a standard 20" front wheel (cheap) and its back to being a normal folding bike which can be used for many years beyond that. So its not an e-bike that needs to be scrapped when the electric parts no longer function.

Note the bike has no handlebar stem height adjustment so this is only really suitable for people of average height for women and slightly below average for men unless you buy an additional handlebar stem with height adjustment perhaps another £30 for the stem from ebay or aliexpress. Many people like folding bikes because one bike can fit all and be used by a whole family of different heights and easily stored in a flat etc the current configuration limits the range of sizes.

Another advantage of this bike is the motor is on the front wheel. Generally you are more likely to have a puncture on the rear wheel than front wheel due to most of the rider weight being at the back. Often e-bike motors make it more time consuming to remove the wheel to fix the puncture so the advantage here is it will be simpler and more easy to fix punctures on the rear wheel. Worth considering fitting Tannus airless tyres.

One of the best e-bikes for quality components and low pricing is the Carrera Crosscity so if you are checking out this model worth checking that model incase you feel like the extra money is justified. A huge amount of advantages to its design for admittedly £185 more with the discount.

This bike is 24V x 8.8Ah which is 211.2Wh (watt hours) which compares to 36V x 8.7Ah = 313.2Wh for the Carrera Crosscity roughly a 50% increase on that bike. Also Carrera claim it has Panasonic cells which might have a lifespan advantage. You can expect roughly 500 full charges as a minimum before capacity starts to noticeably reduce. Frequent users who commute on the bike everyday and charge for both legs of the journey to work may get little over a year, most riders will get many years.
bonzobanana1 h, 12 m ago

One of the good things about this bike is in the future when either the …One of the good things about this bike is in the future when either the motor has failed or the battery is end of life with very low charge capacity maybe 3-5 years you can remove the battery and electric fittings and change to a standard 20" front wheel (cheap) and its back to being a normal folding bike which can be used for many years beyond that. So its not an e-bike that needs to be scrapped when the electric parts no longer function.Note the bike has no handlebar stem height adjustment so this is only really suitable for people of average height for women and slightly below average for men unless you buy an additional handlebar stem with height adjustment perhaps another £30 for the stem from ebay or aliexpress. Many people like folding bikes because one bike can fit all and be used by a whole family of different heights and easily stored in a flat etc the current configuration limits the range of sizes. Another advantage of this bike is the motor is on the front wheel. Generally you are more likely to have a puncture on the rear wheel than front wheel due to most of the rider weight being at the back. Often e-bike motors make it more time consuming to remove the wheel to fix the puncture so the advantage here is it will be simpler and more easy to fix punctures on the rear wheel. Worth considering fitting Tannus airless tyres.One of the best e-bikes for quality components and low pricing is the Carrera Crosscity so if you are checking out this model worth checking that model incase you feel like the extra money is justified. A huge amount of advantages to its design for admittedly £185 more with the discount. This bike is 24V x 8.8Ah which is 211.2Wh (watt hours) which compares to 36V x 8.7Ah = 313.2Wh for the Carrera Crosscity roughly a 50% increase on that bike. Also Carrera claim it has Panasonic cells which might have a lifespan advantage. You can expect roughly 500 full charges as a minimum before capacity starts to noticeably reduce. Frequent users who commute on the bike everyday and charge for both legs of the journey to work may get little over a year, most riders will get many years.


Some good thinking there: if the battery is 3.5kg (Halford's figure), plus more for the motor and other electric gear you'd actually end up with a reasonably light folder. In reality battery prices will contnue to fall and it may be economically viable to re-cell the battery or just buy a new one in a few years time. I'm still amazed at how good the reviews are for such a cheap bike.

Yes, the Carrera is a good deal too, but at a different price point and the reviews aren't quite as good: some seem to have problems with drive cutting out and chain alignment looks like an issue too. You've already made the point about front vs rear wheel motor.
Edited by: "Besford" 17th Apr
I can only see the Carrera crossfire for £650 at halfords
haddock2212 m ago

I can only see the Carrera crossfire for £650 at halfords


Use the 'Get Deal' link above, or use this:
halfords.com/cyc…der

Don't forget the EXTRA10BIKES discount code!
Don’t forget you could also take advantage of your cycle to work scheme to bring the cost down further and spread the cost monthly. check with your HR
I do believe this bike is made by Viking and the model is Harrier. I bought it a couple of years ago when Tesco where selling it under the Hopper brand. It's a great bike but very heavy to lift. Electric bike need to become much cheaper for mass adoption as they are a great way to get around and good for the environment. A lot of people aren't that fit but the bike makes it possible to cover a longer distance. And hills are a breeze.

Edited by: "silps" 17th Apr
silps34 m ago

I do believe this bike is made by Viking and the model is Harrier. I …I do believe this bike is made by Viking and the model is Harrier. I bought it a couple of years ago when Tesco where selling it under the Hopper brand. It's a great bike but very heavy to lift. Electric bike need to become much cheaper for mass adoption as they are a great way to get around and good for the environment. A lot of people aren't that fit but the bike makes it possible to cover a longer distance. And hills are a breeze.[Video]


It won't be made by Viking (Avocet) because they are importers but Coyote is a Avocet brand so you can get the same bike imported from the far east under different brands. Also a completely different importer could import the same bike under a different brand.

I have no problem with Avocet bikes but they often come a bit roughly assembled from the far east so worth taking the time to check everything if you are not getting Halfords to do the assembly.
Besford2 h, 1 m ago

Some good thinking there: if the battery is 3.5kg (Halford's figure), plus …Some good thinking there: if the battery is 3.5kg (Halford's figure), plus more for the motor and other electric gear you'd actually end up with a reasonably light folder. In reality battery prices will contnue to fall and it may be economically viable to re-cell the battery or just buy a new one in a few years time. I'm still amazed at how good the reviews are for such a cheap bike.Yes, the Carrera is a good deal too, but at a different price point and the reviews aren't quite as good: some seem to have problems with drive cutting out and chain alignment looks like an issue too. You've already made the point about front vs rear wheel motor.


You could recell the battery possibly but often that can be a high investment and with other parts of the electrics worn and the motor itself near end of life it could be a false economy. I tend to see the conversion to a standard folding bike as more realistic.

I think there is a cutout issue on many e-bikes, over heating, over current etc, the Carrera having better height adjustment might end up with heavier, taller riders. I doubt the Coyote will be different being lower spec. Also the cut out feature is often to protect the battery or motor so is a good thing for the lifespan of the bike. One of the reviews mentions the Coyote battery failing.

I've just noticed though there is no rear V brake on the images of the bike so it looks like a drum brake on the rear (maybe containing the cadence sensor too?)despite the text saying v-brakes so looks like it would be more complicated to remove both the front and rear wheels so airless Tannus tyres would definitely be a possible solution to that. Initially I thought it was 2 V brakes going by the description with the cadence sensor on the crank. It adds a bit of extra complexity which means both wheels will be more difficult to remove, it's not terrible but just a bit more hassle when you get a puncture and might mean more tools need to be taken with you. It's just not as simple as disc or rim brakes.
Edited by: "bonzobanana" 17th Apr
For a simple puncture half the time you don't even have to remove the wheel to repair the tube
esq358513 m ago

For a simple puncture half the time you don't even have to remove the …For a simple puncture half the time you don't even have to remove the wheel to repair the tube


Like many I just carry a spare tube and repair the inner tube at home, seems the quickest simplest solution however maybe you have a point with this bike. Alternatively you could use a non circular inner tube.

33651383-UybJo.jpg
can you wheel this bike around when folded?
bonzobanana4 h, 28 m ago

One of the good things about this bike is in the future when either the …One of the good things about this bike is in the future when either the motor has failed or the battery is end of life with very low charge capacity maybe 3-5 years you can remove the battery and electric fittings and change to a standard 20" front wheel (cheap) and its back to being a normal folding bike which can be used for many years beyond that. So its not an e-bike that needs to be scrapped when the electric parts no longer function.Note the bike has no handlebar stem height adjustment so this is only really suitable for people of average height for women and slightly below average for men unless you buy an additional handlebar stem with height adjustment perhaps another £30 for the stem from ebay or aliexpress. Many people like folding bikes because one bike can fit all and be used by a whole family of different heights and easily stored in a flat etc the current configuration limits the range of sizes. Another advantage of this bike is the motor is on the front wheel. Generally you are more likely to have a puncture on the rear wheel than front wheel due to most of the rider weight being at the back. Often e-bike motors make it more time consuming to remove the wheel to fix the puncture so the advantage here is it will be simpler and more easy to fix punctures on the rear wheel. Worth considering fitting Tannus airless tyres.One of the best e-bikes for quality components and low pricing is the Carrera Crosscity so if you are checking out this model worth checking that model incase you feel like the extra money is justified. A huge amount of advantages to its design for admittedly £185 more with the discount. This bike is 24V x 8.8Ah which is 211.2Wh (watt hours) which compares to 36V x 8.7Ah = 313.2Wh for the Carrera Crosscity roughly a 50% increase on that bike. Also Carrera claim it has Panasonic cells which might have a lifespan advantage. You can expect roughly 500 full charges as a minimum before capacity starts to noticeably reduce. Frequent users who commute on the bike everyday and charge for both legs of the journey to work may get little over a year, most riders will get many years.


I have this bike (albeit the Viking Harrier version). I would say this bike would still be heavy to ride minus the battery tbh.
Have had several punctures to the front wheel and one on the rear.
Front wheel is a breeze to get off. Rear wheel is an absolute nightmare due to the mud guard.
I changed to puncture resistant tyres after the hassle.

Great bike... I paid £490 2 years ago. Use mine daily for commuting.
I've had this bike for just over a year now and have used it regularly to commute about 4 miles each way per day.
I fold it to get it on the train and continue my journey when I get off the train.

My main observations would be:

1. The first thing you should do when you buy this bike is to change the tyres to some decent puncture resistant ones.
The ones that come with it puncture very easily and I found the back wheel in particular a real pain to change.

2. Make sure you put the seat pole right down as the first step of folding or you will break the chain guard, and Halfords won't be able to source a new one for you.

3. If your public transport doesn't have lifts (like mine) then I hope you have been working out. The Bike is around 25kg but it feels like more because of the shape.

Mine lasted just under a year before I had issues with the electric motor, or rather a connector, it was fixed under warranty but they tried to charge me for the labour. After a long discussion with the manager he waived the labour charge. Just be clear with them about the warranty when you buy it and keep a record if you can.

Apart from the issues I listed it's a pretty good bike and a very good price.
I do still have issues getting up the hill I live on, but I think its just because I live on a particularly steep hill. I'm out of breath after the hill climb with the electric bike, I never managed to make it all the way up on my normal bike.
Edited by: "abuhaneefahali" 17th Apr
You can get 8% off Halfords e-vouchers here ZEEK WEBSITE to use instore to pay for your bike when you opt for collection at Halfords. You also get an immediate £5 off £45 spend on your first purchase of vouchers. I did this without any hassle and my vouchers arrived to my email within minutes.
With a 24v hub driven ebike don't go thinking you'll be powering up any hills, I'm fact you'll grind to a halt and have 20kg of bike to pedal up hill. I had a similar one from a deal on here (Viking e go ) for £249 just out of interest.

24v is fine on flats, but then you're limited to 12mph assistance which is far too slow to feel safe driving on the road, and at which point pedalling up to 20 will be a helluva lot more difficult than a standard cheapo bike.

So unless you're pootling along on cycle paths this bike is a bit pointless.

I upgraded to a self built bike as Derbyshire hills just made it impossible to pedal, now I can blast up them at 20mph and pedal safely on a flat at 30-35mph
matt_vans3 h, 14 m ago

I have this bike (albeit the Viking Harrier version). I would say this …I have this bike (albeit the Viking Harrier version). I would say this bike would still be heavy to ride minus the battery tbh.Have had several punctures to the front wheel and one on the rear. Front wheel is a breeze to get off. Rear wheel is an absolute nightmare due to the mud guard.I changed to puncture resistant tyres after the hassle. Great bike... I paid £490 2 years ago. Use mine daily for commuting.


In theory if you are removing the battery pack and changing the front wheel later on to use it as a standard bike it should be pretty much a standard folding bike weight around 14kg I guess. It's possibly heavier with extra reinforcing but e-bikes normally only end up being 5-6kg heavier I thought with all the electric bits.

Is the rear drum brake any good? Does it make it anymore difficult to get the rear wheel off?

Hmm maybe I'm more susceptible to rear wheel punctures due to my weight but its normally stated more of the weight of the rider is at the back for any rider although the front wheel I guess is the first to encounter any sharp object in the road. I get about 10 rear punctures for every front puncture. Maybe the lighter the rider the more likely punctures at the front.
jaydeeuk11 h, 3 m ago

With a 24v hub driven ebike don't go thinking you'll be powering up any …With a 24v hub driven ebike don't go thinking you'll be powering up any hills, I'm fact you'll grind to a halt and have 20kg of bike to pedal up hill. I had a similar one from a deal on here (Viking e go ) for £249 just out of interest.24v is fine on flats, but then you're limited to 12mph assistance which is far too slow to feel safe driving on the road, and at which point pedalling up to 20 will be a helluva lot more difficult than a standard cheapo bike.So unless you're pootling along on cycle paths this bike is a bit pointless.I upgraded to a self built bike as Derbyshire hills just made it impossible to pedal, now I can blast up them at 20mph and pedal safely on a flat at 30-35mph


Very different view to the reviewers' then. Typical review:

"I got this bike 12 Months ago on the Halfords cycle2work scheme. I use it for my journey to & from work most days & its great !. My journey is about 6 miles in total & I have 2 long steep hills to climb on my route. I use the top Assistance (75%)all the time & the battery lasts me 2 days when it is really cold & 3 days when it is warmer (April to September)."

Clearly you're not the target buyer for this bike. It provides ASSISTANCE up hills and I think e-bikes are legally limited to ~14mph anyway? This is for a commuter/casual rider who wants an easier ride, not someone who wants to "blast up them (hills) at 20 mph" and "pedal ... on the flat at 30-35mph", but you knew that already, didn't you!

Self build bike, hmm, very clever ( ) but irrelevant here.
Edited by: "Besford" 17th Apr
Halfords reviews don't mean much - I left a bad review for something when I got a "leave a review and enter a competition" thing.

Oddly enough my review never showed up.
I questioned and hassled them about it - but the bad one had mysteriously never appeared because it "didn't meet our guidelines", although they couldn't explain which ones; I had been very careful to ensure it DID meet their guidelines.

These doesn't seem like a great bike or an amazing deal to me - but similar bikes are being sold for a good bit more elsewhere.
Halfords service for any issues is typically pretty bad in my experience.
I had one of these and it was very good. I got 21 miles out of it between charges.
Edited by: "AssFace" 17th Apr
bonzobanana1 h, 11 m ago

In theory if you are removing the battery pack and changing the front …In theory if you are removing the battery pack and changing the front wheel later on to use it as a standard bike it should be pretty much a standard folding bike weight around 14kg I guess. It's possibly heavier with extra reinforcing but e-bikes normally only end up being 5-6kg heavier I thought with all the electric bits. Is the rear drum brake any good? Does it make it anymore difficult to get the rear wheel off? Hmm maybe I'm more susceptible to rear wheel punctures due to my weight but its normally stated more of the weight of the rider is at the back for any rider although the front wheel I guess is the first to encounter any sharp object in the road. I get about 10 rear punctures for every front puncture. Maybe the lighter the rider the more likely punctures at the front.


changing the rear tyre out in the middle of nowhere is a nightmare and you need many tools due to the drum brake.
_g_50 m ago

Halfords reviews don't mean much - I left a bad review for something when …Halfords reviews don't mean much - I left a bad review for something when I got a "leave a review and enter a competition" thing.Oddly enough my review never showed up.I questioned and hassled them about it - but the bad one had mysteriously never appeared because it "didn't meet our guidelines", although they couldn't explain which ones; I had been very careful to ensure it DID meet their guidelines.These doesn't seem like a great bike or an amazing deal to me - but similar bikes are being sold for a good bit more elsewhere.Halfords service for any issues is typically pretty bad in my experience.


My advice to you would be 'don't buy one then'. There are plenty of poor reviews around Halford's site - I doubt they considered your comment important enough to be filtered out. There are some other sites I'd be less confident in though - Argos springs to mind.
AssFace30 m ago

changing the rear tyre out in the middle of nowhere is a nightmare and you …changing the rear tyre out in the middle of nowhere is a nightmare and you need many tools due to the drum brake.


Yes, that seems to be the major negative comment in the reviews. I guess forewarned is forearmed - if I were buying one now (I'm not though I'm tempted!) I'd learn what I needed to take with me and how to do it and may even take the advice to fit more puncture resistant tyres and/or tubes. I do wonder what those 'airless' tyres are like - harder ride I'd guess. Does slime work at all?

I did have a bike with hub gears with integrated drum brake - yes it was more complicated to remove the wheel but with the right tools and practice in the warm and dry it wasn't so bad really.

My real surprise on such a cheap bike (relatively speaking) is that the reviews aren't full of comments about motors/controllers/ batteries failing and rubbish components generally. In fact they're better than reviews on some more expensive e-bikes.
Edited by: "Besford" 17th Apr
Besford15 m ago

My advice to you would be 'don't buy one then'. There are plenty of poor …My advice to you would be 'don't buy one then'. There are plenty of poor reviews around Halford's site - I doubt they considered your comment important enough to be filtered out. There are some other sites I'd be less confident in though - Argos springs to mind.


My advice to you would be "don't one one then" too, if you're basing that on the reviews :).
I am in the market for a folding electric bike as it goes, but this isn't the spec I'd be after anyway.

There are plenty of poor reviews; I believe a lot less than the number that gets submitted, however.
Considering much of the rest of Halfords corporate identity (dodgy 'reductions', under qualified and unknowledgable staff etc), this fits right in from my point of view.
_g_10 m ago

My advice to you would be "don't one one then" too, if you're basing that …My advice to you would be "don't one one then" too, if you're basing that on the reviews :).I am in the market for a folding electric bike as it goes, but this isn't the spec I'd be after anyway.There are plenty of poor reviews; I believe a lot less than the number that gets submitted, however.Considering much of the rest of Halfords corporate identity (dodgy 'reductions', under qualified and unknowledgable staff etc), this fits right in from my point of view.


What and where are considering buying then? Presumably a darned sight more than £405?
Besford28 m ago

What and where are considering buying then? Presumably a darned sight …What and where are considering buying then? Presumably a darned sight more than £405?



I want a mid-drive which is likely going to be a DIY case, or ideally one that some else has made; but that's pretty rare for a folding bike.
I've got plenty of batteries - and spare a controller if needed.
Not available for delivery, and not available at the store near me. And thats a massive one.
Beetplek23 m ago

Not available for delivery, and not available at the store near me. And …Not available for delivery, and not available at the store near me. And thats a massive one.


My large local store doesn't have one either but three smaller ones nearby do have stock.
bonzobanana3 h, 15 m ago

In theory if you are removing the battery pack and changing the front …In theory if you are removing the battery pack and changing the front wheel later on to use it as a standard bike it should be pretty much a standard folding bike weight around 14kg I guess. It's possibly heavier with extra reinforcing but e-bikes normally only end up being 5-6kg heavier I thought with all the electric bits. Is the rear drum brake any good? Does it make it anymore difficult to get the rear wheel off? Hmm maybe I'm more susceptible to rear wheel punctures due to my weight but its normally stated more of the weight of the rider is at the back for any rider although the front wheel I guess is the first to encounter any sharp object in the road. I get about 10 rear punctures for every front puncture. Maybe the lighter the rider the more likely punctures at the front.


Rear drum brake isn’t that great. I would’ve rather had a rear V brake.

You have to completely disconnect the rear drum brake, deflate the tyre as much as you can. Once you’ve done that, squeeze the tire as best you can while working it past the mud guard. I guess you could use a Phillips screwdriver and partly remove the guard but I don’t want to risk bending it while removing the tyre as it’s metal.
Not the best bike to work on by a long shot. For commuting though it does the job fine.
Besford2 h, 12 m ago

I do wonder what those 'airless' tyres are like - harder ride I'd guess. …I do wonder what those 'airless' tyres are like - harder ride I'd guess. Does slime work at all?


I've heard those Tannus tyres are pretty good they have a sort of strong foam inside so they aren't rigid. Schwalbe is bringing out their own version which seems very similar to Tannus tyres.

bike-eu.com/sal…030

A bit of competition would be good as the Tannus tyres are quite expensive. I think Tannus guarantee 5,000 kilometres but looking at that news report it looks like Schwalbes maybe 10,000 or maybe that is expected life rather than guaranteed.

Hopefully something that can be perfected and made cheaper and punctures will be a thing of the past.
I am also thinking of building a mid drive folding bike as there does not seem to be much out there thats fairly priced, could anyone suggest a lightweight donor folding bike that would be good for conversion ?
bonzobanana8 h, 33 m ago

Like many I just carry a spare tube and repair the inner tube at home, …Like many I just carry a spare tube and repair the inner tube at home, seems the quickest simplest solution however maybe you have a point with this bike. Alternatively you could use a non circular inner tube.[Image]



Just carry a small pack of skabs and a couple of co2's

Cheaper on ebay sometimes chainreactioncycles.com/sli…440
bonzobanana1 h, 7 m ago

I've heard those Tannus tyres are pretty good they have a sort of strong …I've heard those Tannus tyres are pretty good they have a sort of strong foam inside so they aren't rigid. Schwalbe is bringing out their own version which seems very similar to Tannus tyres.http://www.bike-eu.com/sales-trends/nieuws/2018/3/schwalbe-takes-airless-tyres-to-next-level-10133030A bit of competition would be good as the Tannus tyres are quite expensive. I think Tannus guarantee 5,000 kilometres but looking at that news report it looks like Schwalbes maybe 10,000 or maybe that is expected life rather than guaranteed. Hopefully something that can be perfected and made cheaper and punctures will be a thing of the past.



The Schwalbe will be 89 Euros each cyclingindustry.news/sch…ct/, so considerably dearer than the Tannus (£50 - £60). Tannus are currently the market leaders, but notoriously difficult to fit especially for such small wheels; usually a Tannus dealer with the bespoke Tannus fitting machine would be the best port of call.
tipperman14 h, 22 m ago

I am also thinking of building a mid drive folding bike as there does not …I am also thinking of building a mid drive folding bike as there does not seem to be much out there thats fairly priced, could anyone suggest a lightweight donor folding bike that would be good for conversion ?



First off; they're not reasonably priced, but I believe a Brompton would be out anyway for most setups because of the way it folds - unless you have an in-frame or something like the 'Bikee' - but both are quite expensive now.

Tern, Dahon and B'Twin all make some reasonable quality and (depending on the model) not too heavy bikes that can be picked up for decent prices second hand.
skelto9914 h, 44 m ago

The Schwalbe will be 89 Euros each …The Schwalbe will be 89 Euros each https://cyclingindustry.news/schwalbe-enters-airless-tyre-arena-with-bike-shop-exclusive-product/, so considerably dearer than the Tannus (£50 - £60). Tannus are currently the market leaders, but notoriously difficult to fit especially for such small wheels; usually a Tannus dealer with the bespoke Tannus fitting machine would be the best port of call.


Schwalbe can be expensive but often you can get serious discounts by looking around. At this point I don't know if the Schwalbe's will be better or worse than Tannus. There are also British made Greentyres but they seem to be direct sellers only and postage is expensive so probably better if you are local to the factory in the north east in Middlesborough if they allow collection. My point is that when there is competition in a sector prices come down so Schwalbe might start with high prices but then realise they are losing out to Tannus in sales and reduce their prices. I think Tannus are made in south korea which is more expensive than Indonesia where Hunga make tyres for Schwalbe. So you would imagine Schwalbe could be cheaper long term once they've paid for R&D I guess.

greentyre.com/bic…php
bonzobanana2 h, 21 m ago

Schwalbe can be expensive but often you can get serious discounts by …Schwalbe can be expensive but often you can get serious discounts by looking around. At this point I don't know if the Schwalbe's will be better or worse than Tannus. There are also British made Greentyres but they seem to be direct sellers only and postage is expensive so probably better if you are local to the factory in the north east in Middlesborough if they allow collection. My point is that when there is competition in a sector prices come down so Schwalbe might start with high prices but then realise they are losing out to Tannus in sales and reduce their prices. I think Tannus are made in south korea which is more expensive than Indonesia where Hunga make tyres for Schwalbe. So you would imagine Schwalbe could be cheaper long term once they've paid for R&D I guess.http://www.greentyre.com/bicycle-tyres.php


Reviews seem to be for wheelbarrows!
Yes wheelbarrows and wheelchairs but I guess that is their main market. They seem to be slow moving with their bicycle tyres which seems to be the situation with airless tyres which is pretty much a niche. I think because they ensure the tyres are exactly the right size for your rims almost a specialist product. Which makes me wonder how much they cost. I seem to recall reading an article where someone going touring fitted greentyres. British made and individual service makes me think high pricing but saying that I think their more common products are reasonably priced and lets face it cycling accessories and spares have huge retail margins. A tyre that costs 50 cents to a dollar to make in the far east can retail sometimes for £40.

Actually found some at retail. Not too bad pricing.

acycles.co.uk/cat…yre

acycles.co.uk/gre…BwE
Edited by: "bonzobanana" 18th Apr
There's also Gecko, based and tyres manufactured in Wiltshire. Prices the same as Tannus.

geckorubber.co.uk/ind…tml
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