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Crucial P1 1TB 3D NAND NVMe PCIe M.2 SSD for £86.93 Delivered with Code @ Ebuyer / Ebay
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Crucial P1 1TB 3D NAND NVMe PCIe M.2 SSD for £86.93 Delivered with Code @ Ebuyer / Ebay

£86.93£97.4911%eBay Deals
Expert (Beta) 7
Posted 17th Nov 2019

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For your high productivity workforce that requires more storage and demands better performance, the Crucial® P1 SSD delivers. Capacities start at 500GB and scale to 2TB. Accelerate performance with the latest NVMe™ PCIe® technology. The P1 is designed to be one of the most beneficial upgrades for business computers — storage, speed, and dependability.
Key Features
  • Capacities up to 2TB with sequential reads/writes up to 2,000/1,750 MB/s
  • NVMe™ PCIe® interface marks the next step in storage innovation
  • Micron® 3D NAND – advancing the world's memory and storage technology for 40 years
  • 5-year limited warranty
User Benefits
  • Room to Spare: Securely load and store up to 2TB of important files on Micron® NAND in a tiny M.2 form factor.
  • Vital Performance: NVMe™ PCIe® technology delivers sequential read/write speeds up to 2,000/1,750 MB/s so work gets done faster.
  • Lasting Value: The Crucial P1 SSD is designed to be the only storage upgrade you'll need with an affordable blend of performance and capacity.
  • 5-year Limited Warranty: We back thousands of validation hours, dozens of qualification tests, and a heritage of award-winning
  • SSDs with a 5-year limited warranty.
Specifications
  • Capacity: 1TB
  • Sequential Read: 2,000 MB/
  • Sequential Write: 1,750 MB/s
  • 4KB Random Read: 170k IOPS
  • 4KB Random Write: 240k IOPS
  • Form Factor: M.2
  • Product Dimensions: 22mm x 80mm
  • Product Weight: .017 kg
  • Memory Type: Micron® 3D QLC NAND Flash
  • Controller: SM2263
  • Interface PCIe®: NVMe™ Gen 3
  • MTTF: 1.5 million hours
  • Endurance: Up to 200TB
  • Operating Temperature: 0°C to 70°C
  • Power Usage Active Average: 100mW
  • Hardware Encryption: No
  • Warranty: 5-year limited
Included Accessories
  • Crucial® Storage Executive
  • Acronis® True Image for Crucial
  • Crucial Easy SSD Install Guide
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Top comments
cactusbrandy17/11/2019 13:10

What's the consensus on why these are pants?


I've posted a similar post somewhere else about QLC. However, similar concepts so here is a summary with adaptations for this specific drive. There is more to the story which people need to know about before making an informed choice. For those who are strongly adamant to get this QLC-based drive, then I've offered a few tips.

Before we get to that, this has great random burst which is what the majority of people will feel real-life benefit with. QLC tech will improve over time, just like the previous generations before it. The P1 is a first generation QLC device (in fact, second to market). Even at first generation it's not a bad implementation and the SLC buffer will do a lot to mitigate some of the following issues.

QLC degradation
SLC has an average write endurance of 100,000 program/erase cycles (write operations). MLC has between 35,000 and 10,000. TLC has around 5,000. But QLC only has a measly 1,000. This is due to the higher number of voltage states required.

TIP #1: Don't use this in an environment where you're making lots of read/writes and you don't fancy a fresh install in 5 to [insert unknown arbitary figure] years time. Presumably most techies would fresh install onto new hardware before this cycle, but possibly not the average Joe Bloggs.

Caching
Most drives (even TLC) employ a SLC-based cache buffering. When this is full (e.g. large sequential transfers) you drop back to baseline performance which for QLC is similar to or worse than mechanical drives.


TIP #2: Don't use this if you transfer lots of very large files. Very being the crucial word.

Cache Size
When the drive fills up, the SLC buffer diminishes to the point where it is only 10GB (vs 120-140GB) at only 75% capacity.


TIP #3: If you're going to be using this drive a lot, get the highest capacity you can. Given COD:MW is a 175gb install, you're looking at 2TB for PC gamers.

TL:DR
1) Average users - get whatever drive you want.
2) Gamers - get the highest capacity you can, dont fill more than 75%.
3) Techies - TLC has matured, QLC hasn't quite yet, but as with all tech it will do.
4) Content creators / workstation-class - TLC-based ADATA / Samsung / Sabrent.
7 Comments
Personally I would not give this thing to my worst enemy it beyond the clarity of useless. So cold. My opinion only tho
alan.stevens17/11/2019 13:04

Personally I would not give this thing to my worst enemy it beyond the …Personally I would not give this thing to my worst enemy it beyond the clarity of useless. So cold. My opinion only tho


What's the consensus on why these are pants?
Voted hot. Bought waiting for this for 3 months on Amazon.
cactusbrandy17/11/2019 13:10

What's the consensus on why these are pants?


I've posted a similar post somewhere else about QLC. However, similar concepts so here is a summary with adaptations for this specific drive. There is more to the story which people need to know about before making an informed choice. For those who are strongly adamant to get this QLC-based drive, then I've offered a few tips.

Before we get to that, this has great random burst which is what the majority of people will feel real-life benefit with. QLC tech will improve over time, just like the previous generations before it. The P1 is a first generation QLC device (in fact, second to market). Even at first generation it's not a bad implementation and the SLC buffer will do a lot to mitigate some of the following issues.

QLC degradation
SLC has an average write endurance of 100,000 program/erase cycles (write operations). MLC has between 35,000 and 10,000. TLC has around 5,000. But QLC only has a measly 1,000. This is due to the higher number of voltage states required.

TIP #1: Don't use this in an environment where you're making lots of read/writes and you don't fancy a fresh install in 5 to [insert unknown arbitary figure] years time. Presumably most techies would fresh install onto new hardware before this cycle, but possibly not the average Joe Bloggs.

Caching
Most drives (even TLC) employ a SLC-based cache buffering. When this is full (e.g. large sequential transfers) you drop back to baseline performance which for QLC is similar to or worse than mechanical drives.


TIP #2: Don't use this if you transfer lots of very large files. Very being the crucial word.

Cache Size
When the drive fills up, the SLC buffer diminishes to the point where it is only 10GB (vs 120-140GB) at only 75% capacity.


TIP #3: If you're going to be using this drive a lot, get the highest capacity you can. Given COD:MW is a 175gb install, you're looking at 2TB for PC gamers.

TL:DR
1) Average users - get whatever drive you want.
2) Gamers - get the highest capacity you can, dont fill more than 75%.
3) Techies - TLC has matured, QLC hasn't quite yet, but as with all tech it will do.
4) Content creators / workstation-class - TLC-based ADATA / Samsung / Sabrent.
iamwhoiam17/11/2019 13:55

I've posted a similar post somewhere else about QLC. However, similar …I've posted a similar post somewhere else about QLC. However, similar concepts so here is a summary with adaptations for this specific drive. There is more to the story which people need to know about before making an informed choice. For those who are strongly adamant to get this QLC-based drive, then I've offered a few tips.Before we get to that, this has great random burst which is what the majority of people will feel real-life benefit with. QLC tech will improve over time, just like the previous generations before it. The P1 is a first generation QLC device (in fact, second to market). Even at first generation it's not a bad implementation and the SLC buffer will do a lot to mitigate some of the following issues.QLC degradationSLC has an average write endurance of 100,000 program/erase cycles (write operations). MLC has between 35,000 and 10,000. TLC has around 5,000. But QLC only has a measly 1,000. This is due to the higher number of voltage states required.TIP #1: Don't use this in an environment where you're making lots of read/writes and you don't fancy a fresh install in 5 to [insert unknown arbitary figure] years time. Presumably most techies would fresh install onto new hardware before this cycle, but possibly not the average Joe Bloggs.CachingMost drives (even TLC) employ a SLC-based cache buffering. When this is full (e.g. large sequential transfers) you drop back to baseline performance which for QLC is similar to or worse than mechanical drives.[Image] TIP #2: Don't use this if you transfer lots of very large files. Very being the crucial word.Cache SizeWhen the drive fills up, the SLC buffer diminishes to the point where it is only 10GB (vs 120-140GB) at only 75% capacity.[Image] TIP #3: If you're going to be using this drive a lot, get the highest capacity you can. Given COD:MW is a 175gb install, you're looking at 2TB for PC gamers.TL:DR1) Average users - get whatever drive you want.2) Gamers - get the highest capacity you can, dont fill more than 75%.3) Techies - TLC has matured, QLC hasn't quite yet, but as with all tech it will do.4) Content creators / workstation-class - TLC-based ADATA / Samsung / Sabrent.


Perfect thank you kindly. I was waiting for the Sabrent again, but I think it'll be a black Friday wait in general!

Thanks again.
iamwhoiam17/11/2019 13:55

I've posted a similar post somewhere else about QLC. However, similar …I've posted a similar post somewhere else about QLC. However, similar concepts so here is a summary with adaptations for this specific drive. There is more to the story which people need to know about before making an informed choice. For those who are strongly adamant to get this QLC-based drive, then I've offered a few tips.Before we get to that, this has great random burst which is what the majority of people will feel real-life benefit with. QLC tech will improve over time, just like the previous generations before it. The P1 is a first generation QLC device (in fact, second to market). Even at first generation it's not a bad implementation and the SLC buffer will do a lot to mitigate some of the following issues.QLC degradationSLC has an average write endurance of 100,000 program/erase cycles (write operations). MLC has between 35,000 and 10,000. TLC has around 5,000. But QLC only has a measly 1,000. This is due to the higher number of voltage states required.TIP #1: Don't use this in an environment where you're making lots of read/writes and you don't fancy a fresh install in 5 to [insert unknown arbitary figure] years time. Presumably most techies would fresh install onto new hardware before this cycle, but possibly not the average Joe Bloggs.CachingMost drives (even TLC) employ a SLC-based cache buffering. When this is full (e.g. large sequential transfers) you drop back to baseline performance which for QLC is similar to or worse than mechanical drives.[Image] TIP #2: Don't use this if you transfer lots of very large files. Very being the crucial word.Cache SizeWhen the drive fills up, the SLC buffer diminishes to the point where it is only 10GB (vs 120-140GB) at only 75% capacity.[Image] TIP #3: If you're going to be using this drive a lot, get the highest capacity you can. Given COD:MW is a 175gb install, you're looking at 2TB for PC gamers.TL:DR1) Average users - get whatever drive you want.2) Gamers - get the highest capacity you can, dont fill more than 75%.3) Techies - TLC has matured, QLC hasn't quite yet, but as with all tech it will do.4) Content creators / workstation-class - TLC-based ADATA / Samsung / Sabrent.


Heat for the effort. Your summary here matches what I've learnt about QLC too.
Any idea of this particular drive gets warm?
Considering chucking 2-4 of these in a pcie 4x nvme adapter like the Asus.
My "tier1" slc drives occupy my 2 mobo slots but need more storage.
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