Damp problems?  Check out with the Brennenstuhl 1298680 Moisture Detector (Damp meter) £16.12  (Prime) / £21.74 (non Prime) @ Amazon
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Damp problems? Check out with the Brennenstuhl 1298680 Moisture Detector (Damp meter) £16.12 (Prime) / £21.74 (non Prime) @ Amazon

82
Found 10th Apr 2016
Very useful for checking any damp issues around the house.

To determine the moisture content of wood or building material, such as, e.g. concrete, brick, screed, plasterboard, wallpaper, etc.

Measurement range of 5 - 50 % for wood, or 1.5 - 33 % for building material.

Display on a large LCD display (in percent, resolution 0.1 %) as well as acoustically (can be deactivated).

Practical "hold" function also makes measurement possible at locations difficult to access.

Automatic switch-off approx. 3 mins, after last application.

Battery low voltage display.

Robust, ergonomic housing with separate compartment for 9 V monobloc battery (not included).

With protective cap.

SAMPLE USES

Locating a leak in the wall

Place the probe on the surface to be tested. Take a reading and read the value from the display window. Repeat this procedure in various places. If the readings get higher, then you are getting closer to the leak. If the values stop increasing, you’ve found the leak.

Check the moisture content of construction materials e.g. concrete, tile, screed, plaster, carpets prior to finishing.

Check the moisture content of wood e.g. of firewood or wood as a building material

Determining the moisture content of soil

Instruction manual: brennenstuhl.com/ind…pdf
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82 Comments
Tena Lady would sort you out......oops!
Hmmmmm had a look and found this one, any ideas on the differences?

This meter has allowed me to prove my case and I'm now in the process of taking my local council to trial.
They use the Protimeter? Whenever it alerted they'd say, it's calibrated to wood, as an excuse. I soon proved they were talking carp.
BIGUSHEADUS

Hmmmmm had a look and found this one, any ideas on the differences?


Only works with wood
Moisture problems at home? just gaze into her eyes, you'll know if it's game on or not
gr8t1

Only works with wood



​in description it says brick
These just measure electrical conductance so don't think it's really that accurate on anything other than wood.... it's why 'Damp Specialists' use these sorts of things to get damp 'results' - you can probe these things against your hand and it'll register 'damp'


Edited by: "spannerzone" 10th Apr 2016
looks useful, thanks op, can this be used to check the moisture level in the air of a room or the loft?
toonarmani

Moisture problems at home? just gaze into her eyes, you'll know if it's … Moisture problems at home? just gaze into her eyes, you'll know if it's game on or not


Moisture problems are normally caused by limited preparation time before the mainjob.
atangy

looks useful, thanks op, can this be used to check the moisture level in … looks useful, thanks op, can this be used to check the moisture level in the air of a room or the loft?



No
atangy

looks useful, thanks op, can this be used to check the moisture level in … looks useful, thanks op, can this be used to check the moisture level in the air of a room or the loft?


It'll likely have 2 metal probes (because it reads the conductance) you push into the item being checked, so no, not any good for taking air readings.
Thanks
toonarmani

Moisture problems at home? just gaze into her eyes, you'll know if it's … Moisture problems at home? just gaze into her eyes, you'll know if it's game on or not


LOOL
Only a usefull tool if you understand how it works, and what it should read!
atangy

looks useful, thanks op, can this be used to check the moisture level in … looks useful, thanks op, can this be used to check the moisture level in the air of a room or the loft?

thermometer.co.uk/hum…tml - this may be suitable?
It's got 2 prongs that need to make contact with a surface. You get a visual and audio reading. The display is poor in a dark corner but the beeping gets faster the more damp detected. It tells you what readings are normal on the back. My walls were 33%, 16% is the maximum accepted in homes
atangy

looks useful, thanks op, can this be used to check the moisture level in … looks useful, thanks op, can this be used to check the moisture level in the air of a room or the loft?


For that you want a hygrometer. You can get analogue ones from pets at home
petsathome.com/web…wcB
Digital one can be found for cheap on eBay or about £10 for a decent one
may as well buy a cheap multimeter and use the resistance setting, then at least you have it to test batteries with as well!
Hi guys its a very good price for a moisture meter. I am a building surveying student and moisture meters are only calibrated for timber so the results are only accurate in timber. However if they are used in other materials such as brick, plaster etc they can give an indication if the material is damp. You just cant rely on the results 100%
Remember... There is no such thing as 'rising damp' - it doesnt exist... No evidence at all for it.

Many years working in the trade and i have never seen a damp issue that couldnt be explained by something more realistic
iamprobably

Remember... There is no such thing as 'rising damp' - it doesnt exist...



Yes there is, it starred Leonard Rossiter.
No8

Yes there is, it starred Leonard Rossiter.



Fair point... But dont be conned by these meters... They are useless on walls and are meant for wood.

There is absolutely no use for them in detecting damp in the house.. Dont waste your money... It'll show high damp levels in almost any house, thats why companies use them to flog equally useless dpc's!!
iamprobably

Remember... There is no such thing as 'rising damp' - it doesnt exist... … Remember... There is no such thing as 'rising damp' - it doesnt exist... No evidence at all for it.Many years working in the trade and i have never seen a damp issue that couldnt be explained by something more realistic




I remember a TV programme years ago that prove that most so-called 'rising damp' was actually just condensation.

Then there was that other programme......

iamprobably

Remember... There is no such thing as 'rising damp' - it doesnt exist... … Remember... There is no such thing as 'rising damp' - it doesnt exist... No evidence at all for it.Many years working in the trade and i have never seen a damp issue that couldnt be explained by something more realistic


If your wall had no damp course, water could possible penetrate the cement and bricks and slowly rise up the brick work by capillary action. RISING DAMP

Comment

mymymy

This meter has allowed me to prove my case and I'm now in the process of … This meter has allowed me to prove my case and I'm now in the process of taking my local council to trial. They use the Protimeter? Whenever it alerted they'd say, it's calibrated to wood, as an excuse. I soon proved they were talking carp.


As a building Surveyor for my council this is more than likely condensation. I have also faced people like yourself in court on many an occasion and made them look very stupid when providing results of a speedy moisture test which takes actual readings from the building fabric, not just the plaster.
These meters are a waste of time and money especially if you don't know how to use it and don't carry out profiling rather than just sticking it anywhere in the wall and claiming it is damp.
Good deal op.
If you think you have damp, get a flaming professional in!
iamprobably

Remember... There is no such thing as 'rising damp' - it doesnt exist... … Remember... There is no such thing as 'rising damp' - it doesnt exist... No evidence at all for it.Many years working in the trade and i have never seen a damp issue that couldnt be explained by something more realistic



We'll what's the term for when rain water doesn't drain away from the main wall, getting soaked into the building and causing the inner walls to dampen?

If the term isn't 'rising damp', it should be...
If rising damp doesn't exist then why bother building with a damp-proof course?! Older constructions most certainly can suffer from rising damp - the house I grew up in as a child was from the 1800s and the kitchen was a horrid wet mess for most of the year.
delusion

We'll what's the term for when rain water doesn't drain away from the … We'll what's the term for when rain water doesn't drain away from the main wall, getting soaked into the building and causing the inner walls to dampen? If the term isn't 'rising damp', it should be...



The closest term would be flooded.

Rising damp has been shown to be a myth, though there are many damp issues in UK homes. I had an issue highlighted by a surveyor which my mortgage lender used to withhold an amount on the mortgage. We moved in, put the heating on and opened windows occasionally, we sold the house having done no repairs with no damp issues. Houses need ventilation, damp is often caused by inadequate air flow.
If you think you have damp, get a flaming professional in!
Agreed, but get an independent damp specialist in who does not actually carry out renovation work.
These people are quite hard to find but are out there.
Damp company's are inclined to find problems in order to keep themselves in work.
Rising damp may be real or maybe not but let the real experts decide for you, NOT damp company salesmen.

Edited by: "fraser4691" 10th Apr 2016
Many damp situations are caused by water ingress from external sources. Such as a leaking roofline gutter allowing rain to saturate the external wall and that eventually causes "ingress" through to inner wall above the dpc level. Another typical issue is where a boundary wall is built into the house wall again causing a "bridge" between a wet wall and the house again causing ingress above the dpc level. If internal render and plaster is allowed to go below the dpc that too will cause a bridge resulting in capiliary action and resulting in damp. Such damp in this situation is commonly known as Rising Damp, as its source is below the dpc. Once saturated the damp will cause damage to the substrate of the building even after the source of damp has been resolved, this requires treatment of the fabric of the building with "salt away" to neutralize the salt or cutting away and replacing the damaged plaster, render or brickwork. Plastering over the damage will result in the salt showing through on the new plaster /wall. These meters are therefore useful to indicate where potential moisture exists, however care is needed to consider what is causing the moisture, it may be rising damp however equally it may be many other causes including condensation !
DaviesH

The closest term would be flooded.



That term doesn't really fit. I just renovated a victorian house, and had damp issues in the back kitchen. Had 2 different building firms suggest that it was either a burst pipe, or that the damp course (or whatever they used then) had gone due to age and a membrane fitted in the floor would keep the water out of the room. Both terrible and expensive solutions...

In the end my decorator suggested it was the small puddle by the outer wall after raining. All we needed to do was repave and direct away from the house. Cleared up pretty quickly.

Is their point that the term 'rising damp' is never a cause of a problem, it's always something else? I always just assumed it was a term for a symptom, and therefor valid

delusion

That term doesn't really fit. I just renovated a victorian house, and had … That term doesn't really fit. I just renovated a victorian house, and had damp issues in the back kitchen. Had 2 different building firms suggest that it was either a burst pipe, or that the damp course (or whatever they used then) had gone due to age and a membrane fitted in the floor would keep the water out of the room. Both terrible and expensive solutions... In the end my decorator suggested it was the small puddle by the outer wall after raining. All we needed to do was repave and direct away from the house. Cleared up pretty quickly.Is their point that the term 'rising damp' is never a cause of a problem, it's always something else? I always just assumed it was a term for a symptom, and therefor valid



Yes generally there is another factor which is causing moisture to ingress or penetrate though the fabric.

In your case its highly unlikely that the orginial slate DPC to the kitchen would have failed. It is more likely that the external areas have, over the years, been built up and are either breaching the DPC or there is not the minimum 6 inch distance between ground level and the course.

Rising damp is a term generally used by salesman of liquid DPC companies to sell there products, which are a waste of money.
I don't need one of these as I can just look at the mound growing on my walls
As an FYI. Bringing one of these to a house viewing serves two purposes, firstly you can hunt out hidden damp. Chimney breasts etc, saving on potential homebuyer surveys like I have! And secondly usually the estate agent is a little shocked you are so well prepared and treats you like more of an adult! "Aaaand this is the kitchen!" - as if the sink and oven and worktops didn't give it away!
Rising damp DOES exists in theory however in practice the main causes of damp are condensation/poor ventilation, moisture penetration or a leak/tracking moisture. Check extracts are on and pulling sufficient air, get trickle vents fitted if you don't have them, check external ground levels don't bridge dpc, check for leaks to gutters, downpipes, hoppers etc. If someone tells you that you need an injected dpc, try a French drain for a year first, will solve dpc level damp issues 9 times out of 10.
iamprobably

Remember... There is no such thing as 'rising damp' - it doesnt exist... … Remember... There is no such thing as 'rising damp' - it doesnt exist... No evidence at all for it.Many years working in the trade and i have never seen a damp issue that couldnt be explained by something more realistic



So if I stand a block or brick in a tray of water, the water won't rise up the block or brick?
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