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David Wilson Homes 5% Deposit Contribution for NHS Workers buying a new home (Upto £15,000)
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David Wilson Homes 5% Deposit Contribution for NHS Workers buying a new home (Upto £15,000)

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Posted 29th May

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David Wilson are offering 5% deposit contribution for all NHS workers when they buy a new home with them.

Maximum contribution £15,000.
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I bet they bumped their price up by 5 percent
Personally, if it was me... I would artificially inflate the development plot prices buy a couple of percent to compensate / absorb for the 5% of the few who would take this up.

Shafting the rest of the potential buyers to offset the NHS staff withouth giving any margin away (within reason, of course) whilst appearing like im giving upto 15 bags of sand away.

Well done David Wilson. Maybe change the word 'Thank' in Thank you.
69 Comments
wowsers
I bet they bumped their price up by 5 percent
Personally, if it was me... I would artificially inflate the development plot prices buy a couple of percent to compensate / absorb for the 5% of the few who would take this up.

Shafting the rest of the potential buyers to offset the NHS staff withouth giving any margin away (within reason, of course) whilst appearing like im giving upto 15 bags of sand away.

Well done David Wilson. Maybe change the word 'Thank' in Thank you.
mikebo129/05/2020 11:51

I bet they bumped their price up by 5 percent


You beat me too it!
You'd have to bribe me a damn sight more than that to buy a house at the moment!
DildoBagginz29/05/2020 11:55

You beat me too it!


Yeah but you expressed it much better.

Its quite a disgusting tactic IMO
CaptainSocks29/05/2020 12:03

You'd have to bribe me a damn sight more than that to buy a house at the …You'd have to bribe me a damn sight more than that to buy a house at the moment!


What's wrong with buying a house at the moment?
at least everyone now knows they have minimum 5% margin to play with for fun
djames10829/05/2020 12:42

What's wrong with buying a house at the moment?


Do you watch the news?
susdev29/05/2020 12:49

Do you watch the news?


I watch the news, what’s wrong with buying a house at the moment?
MedicineBall29/05/2020 12:59

I watch the news, what’s wrong with buying a house at the moment?


Yes
. What wrong ..price drop 0.5% ..and going down I heard from my advice wait..
MedicineBall29/05/2020 12:59

I watch the news, what’s wrong with buying a house at the moment?


Obviously... house prices will never recover, people will be on furlough forever, coronavirus is going to kill everyone and there will be no more economies or societies.

In fact, im going to the nearest lambo dealer and having a blow out whilst you suckers buy your bricks and mortars like fools only to find out they will be your tombs...
Sopola_Arcane29/05/2020 13:04

Yes . What wrong ..price drop 0.5% ..and going down I heard from my …Yes . What wrong ..price drop 0.5% ..and going down I heard from my advice wait..


Yes its like Barclays shares, wait until houses drop over 68% then buy low, sell high!
Edited by: "DildoBagginz" 29th May
DildoBagginz29/05/2020 13:06

Yes its like Barclays shares, wait until houses drop over 68% then buy …Yes its like Barclays shares, wait until houses drop over 68% then buy low, sell high!


Issue for me with that is house prices are seemingly bulletproof. The prices may increase slower but looking back to 2008 it barely touched them.
Too much demand and not enough supply
MedicineBall29/05/2020 13:13

Issue for me with that is house prices are seemingly bulletproof. The …Issue for me with that is house prices are seemingly bulletproof. The prices may increase slower but looking back to 2008 it barely touched them. Too much demand and not enough supply


Indeed. Overpopulation, the ongoing elephant in the room mixed with the developers ability to miss on the GOV's target by over 50% last year means the gap for demand is only growing with each year.

House prices as a commodity in the U.K is pretty much certain. Although maybe we should whip all our equities out and put it into Hipster coffee establishments.
Edited by: "DildoBagginz" 29th May
DildoBagginz29/05/2020 13:17

Indeed. Overpopulation, the ongoing elephant in the room mixed with the …Indeed. Overpopulation, the ongoing elephant in the room mixed with the developers ability to miss on the GOV's target by over 50% last year means the gap for demand is only growing with each year.House prices as a commodity in the U.K is pretty much certain. Although maybe we should whip all our equities out and put it into Hipster coffee establishments.


Well tbh if you were a developer would you increase supply? You would put a huge dent in your own margin as if you lower the demand by building more houses the amount you can charge per house is lower.
That’s why all the big developers are sat on a lot of land.
DildoBagginz29/05/2020 13:05

Obviously... house prices will never recover, people will be on furlough …Obviously... house prices will never recover, people will be on furlough forever, coronavirus is going to kill everyone and there will be no more economies or societies.In fact, im going to the nearest lambo dealer and having a blow out whilst you suckers buy your bricks and mortars like fools only to find out they will be your tombs...


My thought exactly
susdev29/05/2020 12:49

Do you watch the news?


I suppose you never going to have kids either because there's never a right time for that either then you will die alone with no house nothing to show for your life congratulations
mikebo129/05/2020 11:51

I bet they bumped their price up by 5 percent


To be fair, they are not alone. Virtual signalling comes at a cost (Just Eat, I'm looking at you.)
Same for Barratt Homes as they are same group. Are David wilson and Barratt homes good quality at present, if not who is better? anyone else know any other new build 'deals' atm, thanks
CrazyCatManDo29/05/2020 13:59

Same for Barratt Homes as they are same group. Are David wilson and …Same for Barratt Homes as they are same group. Are David wilson and Barratt homes good quality at present, if not who is better? anyone else know any other new build 'deals' atm, thanks


I looked at a new build before i got my '35 year old' house i am in now.

I really was not impressed. Having a conversation on the landing with the estate agent, I leaned back on the wall and a hanging picture started to rock back and forth. From this i pressed the plasterboard and it started flexing in its entirety. This mixed with me struggling to turn around a 64 plate Polo without going on the neighbours drive, was enough to convince me that there was very little perceived value in the house. (Easier to believe this than to admit my lack of abilities in manouvering a wee polo)

Of course not all new builds are the same, but if I was going to buy any new developer (which I never would from my experience) I would pick Taylor or Barratt from dealings with groundworkers.
Edited by: "DildoBagginz" 29th May
DildoBagginz29/05/2020 13:05

Obviously... house prices will never recover, people will be on furlough …Obviously... house prices will never recover, people will be on furlough forever, coronavirus is going to kill everyone and there will be no more economies or societies.In fact, im going to the nearest lambo dealer and having a blow out whilst you suckers buy your bricks and mortars like fools only to find out they will be your tombs...


Go, buy yourself one... Enjoy it before it burst into flames.
Wait until more houses come on the market after poor old folk die through this virus because of people not sticking to the rules and or the relaxation of them.
works like this - they'll get the 5% and even more back when they sell on the RPI + 2.5% escalating ground rent to an offshore BVI company controlled by a chechen warlord (via his cousin as beneficial owner) who'll also charge £199 + VAT + surveyor fees for permission to install a front door bell
MedicineBall29/05/2020 13:13

Issue for me with that is house prices are seemingly bulletproof. The …Issue for me with that is house prices are seemingly bulletproof. The prices may increase slower but looking back to 2008 it barely touched them. Too much demand and not enough supply


This just is not true. If you had bought a house in 2007 by 2009 its value would have been roughly 20% lower.

The main risk of buying right now is that if you're getting a mortgage there is a real possibility of going into negative equity. This might not be a problem if you can afford the mortgage and are happy to pay the asking price for houses atm. But it's a risk for a lot of people, and even just psychologically (if not also financially) negative equity is a bad situation to be in.
Edited by: "susdev" 29th May
djames10829/05/2020 13:33

I suppose you never going to have kids either because there's never a …I suppose you never going to have kids either because there's never a right time for that either then you will die alone with no house nothing to show for your life congratulations


Don't be silly. There's a real risk the housing market will take a hit in the next couple months.

Afaik the cost of having kids hasn't changed. However if someone just lost their job (or it was a real risk) I would definitely advise against having kids right now until their situation became more stable.

To recommend differently is just foolish.
susdev29/05/2020 18:47

Don't be silly. There's a real risk the housing market will take a hit in …Don't be silly. There's a real risk the housing market will take a hit in the next couple months.Afaik the cost of having kids hasn't changed. However if someone just lost their job (or it was a real risk) I would definitely advise against having kids right now until their situation became more stable. To recommend differently is just foolish.


Well thats not true as with inflation the cost of most things for children goes up

The housing market will not change much, and any losses will rebound as it always does, we are a small land mass and housing is increasingly in need fuelling demand and increasing prices, this is unlikely to change any time soon if ever.
Plus if you buy a house and it loses a couple of % in value in the short term it hardly matters unless you are really going to move house so soon after buying, or if you do not plan to move you will pay it off so the value doesnt matter.
Only issue lies if your job security is at risk as you could default, other than that its business as usual
susdev29/05/2020 18:40

This just is not true. If you had bought a house in 2007 by 2009 its value …This just is not true. If you had bought a house in 2007 by 2009 its value would have been roughly 20% lower. The main risk of buying right now is that if you're getting a mortgage there is a real possibility of going into negative equity. This might not be a problem if you can afford the mortgage and are happy to pay the asking price for houses atm. But it's a risk for a lot of people, and even just psychologically (if not also financially) negative equity is a bad situation to be in.


Lmao house prices have never dropped 20%

Maybe the odd desperate seller or repossession sales caused a 20% loss but no way did the housing market lose 20% across the board thats just ridiculous.
A house I bought in 2005 was worth £5k more around 2009 and in 2018 I sold it for £15k more so your laughable figures do not add up
djames10829/05/2020 19:01

Well thats not true as with inflation the cost of most things for children …Well thats not true as with inflation the cost of most things for children goes up The housing market will not change much, and any losses will rebound as it always does, we are a small land mass and housing is increasingly in need fuelling demand and increasing prices, this is unlikely to change any time soon if ever. Plus if you buy a house and it loses a couple of % in value in the short term it hardly matters unless you are really going to move house so soon after buying, or if you do not plan to move you will pay it off so the value doesnt matter.Only issue lies if your job security is at risk as you could default, other than that its business as usual


Agreed. Any negative equity would be short lived and be back to normal in about 18 months.
Going onto the price of house between 2008 to 2009 dropping around 20%.
Different for different areas. London went up and where I live the market stayed strong with marginal losses in equity. The differences from region to region was staggering with 34% down in Northern Ireland. Outlayers like that will always skew data.

With this in mind too. 2008 crash was directly linked to housing. There was no furlough scheme and less safety nets such as ‘mortgage holidays’ in place. The repossession rate will be much lower, so too should be missed payments and defaults. I could be wrong but I’m not expecting any huge falls in house prices, it will take some hits with banks not lending as freely.
MedicineBall29/05/2020 19:11

Agreed. Any negative equity would be short lived and be back to normal in …Agreed. Any negative equity would be short lived and be back to normal in about 18 months. Going onto the price of house between 2008 to 2009 dropping around 20%. Different for different areas. London went up and where I live the market stayed strong with marginal losses in equity. The differences from region to region was staggering with 34% down in Northern Ireland. Outlayers like that will always skew data. With this in mind too. 2008 crash was directly linked to housing. There was no furlough scheme and less safety nets such as ‘mortgage holidays’ in place. The repossession rate will be much lower, so too should be missed payments and defaults. I could be wrong but I’m not expecting any huge falls in house prices, it will take some hits with banks not lending as freely.


Well if the fearmongering is to be believed then apparently we can all buy houses at a 20% discount soon then make a fortune when prices bounce back.....
So surely then that mean that now and the near future is the perfect time to buy.....contradicting the original comment......
.
djames10829/05/2020 19:17

Well if the fearmongering is to be believed then apparently we can all buy …Well if the fearmongering is to be believed then apparently we can all buy houses at a 20% discount soon then make a fortune when prices bounce back.....So surely then that mean that now and the near future is the perfect time to buy.....contradicting the original comment.......


Indeed its the perfect time. Taking a 20% hit on your £150k house to buy your £300k house at a 20% discount is an opportunity well received.

The stock market wiped out 90% of share prices for some, and people honestly believe they will never recover, even on defensive stocks which operate in necessity commodities. Of course, the people who miss out on this will always chew the wasp.
Edited by: "DildoBagginz" 29th May
johnszi2329/05/2020 15:23

Go, buy yourself one... Enjoy it before it burst into flames.


Its O.K Johnszi, I bought a 2nd as well as a Fezzer. Might as well seeing as there isnt going to be a world left next week!
DildoBagginz29/05/2020 20:01

Indeed its the perfect time. Taking a 20% hit on your £150k house to buy …Indeed its the perfect time. Taking a 20% hit on your £150k house to buy your £300k house at a 20% discount is an opportunity well received.The stock market wiped out 90% of share prices for some, and people honestly believe they will never recover, even on defensive stocks which operate in necessity commodities. Of course, the people who miss out on this will always chew the wasp.


Its a pretty regular thing a recession roughly every 10 years so its hardly a shocker, last one was 2008 so we were overdue one

The shrewd people buy during a recession, be it stocks, houses etc, those who are scared of their own shadow just scoff and moan and lose out.

They are generally known as doom and gloomers, remainers, glass half emptiers etc etc.

I was quite happy to buy lloyds shares at half the price I paid for my original batch, i can simply sell the originals when they hit their original value and have twice what I had before and they essentially haven't cost anything to double them, do that every recession theres your pension pot. I am by no means an expert but you can have that advice for free
Grow up.
djames10829/05/2020 20:15

Its a pretty regular thing a recession roughly every 10 years so its …Its a pretty regular thing a recession roughly every 10 years so its hardly a shocker, last one was 2008 so we were overdue oneThe shrewd people buy during a recession, be it stocks, houses etc, those who are scared of their own shadow just scoff and moan and lose out.They are generally known as doom and gloomers, remainers, glass half emptiers etc etc.I was quite happy to buy lloyds shares at half the price I paid for my original batch, i can simply sell the originals when they hit their original value and have twice what I had before and they essentially haven't cost anything to double them, do that every recession theres your pension pot. I am by no means an expert but you can have that advice for free


Same here matey Lloyds and Barclays £££.

Johnszi obviously missed out on his Lloyds from his comment above...

Heres to the next crash djames. Hope you managed to pick up some petrochem whilst they had the COVID / OPEC debacle. Once in a lifetime opportunity that was! The perfect storm.
DildoBagginz29/05/2020 20:41

Same here matey Lloyds and Barclays £££. Johnszi obviously missed out on …Same here matey Lloyds and Barclays £££. Johnszi obviously missed out on his Lloyds from his comment above...Heres to the next crash djames. Hope you managed to pick up some petrochem whilst they had the COVID / OPEC debacle. Once in a lifetime opportunity that was! The perfect storm.


Got some glaxo
djames10829/05/2020 19:05

Lmao house prices have never dropped 20%Maybe the odd desperate seller or …Lmao house prices have never dropped 20%Maybe the odd desperate seller or repossession sales caused a 20% loss but no way did the housing market lose 20% across the board thats just ridiculous.A house I bought in 2005 was worth £5k more around 2009 and in 2018 I sold it for £15k more so your laughable figures do not add up



You must have a very short memory. statista.com/sta…uk/

If you bought a house in 2007, it likely would not have reached that value again until around 2015 (about 8 years later). It's foolish to act so bravado at times like this when people can lose a lot of money listening to your advice instead of being cautious.
MedicineBall29/05/2020 19:11

Agreed. Any negative equity would be short lived and be back to normal in …Agreed. Any negative equity would be short lived and be back to normal in about 18 months. Going onto the price of house between 2008 to 2009 dropping around 20%. Different for different areas. London went up and where I live the market stayed strong with marginal losses in equity. The differences from region to region was staggering with 34% down in Northern Ireland. Outlayers like that will always skew data. With this in mind too. 2008 crash was directly linked to housing. There was no furlough scheme and less safety nets such as ‘mortgage holidays’ in place. The repossession rate will be much lower, so too should be missed payments and defaults. I could be wrong but I’m not expecting any huge falls in house prices, it will take some hits with banks not lending as freely.


You're ignoring a potential increase in supply with a lot of elderly folk dying.
Only tell them you work for the NHS when you've agreed on a price to see if it's genuine discount
susdev29/05/2020 21:19

You're ignoring a potential increase in supply with a lot of elderly folk …You're ignoring a potential increase in supply with a lot of elderly folk dying.


A lot of elderly folk dying ? Im sorry but this *ahem* pandemic killed enough people out of a 66M cap populus to cause a dent in the supply and demand argument ?

Statistically its a drop in the ocean.
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