Dawes XC18 Rigid Mountain Bike 16" frame 2017 £144 @ Tredz - Free Postage
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Dawes XC18 Rigid Mountain Bike 16" frame 2017 £144 @ Tredz - Free Postage

18
Found 25th Mar
All round MTB performance for rough roads and gravel tracks. The Dawes XC18 is an entry level mountain bike with a rigid fork for a simple, efficient ride.

The frame is built from lightweight 6061 aluminium alloy and offers a stable riding position for confident cycling. The 26” wheels are tough and are shod with high volume tyres that add a little cushioning on rough roads and tracks.

The Shimano 3x6 speed drivetrain offers a good spread of gears for the hills while the V-brakes give you powerful speed control.

The Dawes XC18 is an affordable mountain bike for all-round cycling on less-than-perfect road surfaces.
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Plus an extra £5 off if you enter ECWJ2R. Good deal OP
Only "16inch available. But good deal if that's your size
Edited by: "hhali" 25th Mar
You don't get quill stems or freewheels on real mountain bikes this is more of a hybrid for road and light trails. It won't survive drops or much abuse. This is more mountain bike style.
6 speed normally means low end non standard frame and equipment.

Am surprised it has a Dawes label.
bonzobanana46 m ago

You don't get quill stems or freewheels on real mountain bikes this is …You don't get quill stems or freewheels on real mountain bikes this is more of a hybrid for road and light trails. It won't survive drops or much abuse. This is more mountain bike style.


You used to get quill stems on mountain bikes all the time in the late 80s and early 90s.
LadyEleanor33 m ago

6 speed normally means low end non standard frame and equipment.Am …6 speed normally means low end non standard frame and equipment.Am surprised it has a Dawes label.



18
The rear of the 6 speed cog is not normally a standard 135mm making upgrades futile.
cicobuff8 h, 39 m ago

You used to get quill stems on mountain bikes all the time in the late 80s …You used to get quill stems on mountain bikes all the time in the late 80s and early 90s.


I'm not sure when the threadless headset came in but it might have been the early 90s. Whatever using such a bike off road risks the handlebars turning without the front wheel doing so or the stem raising or falling as you ride. This isn't a mountain bike its mountain bike style. Clearly a very budget bike with the only upgrade being from a steel to aluminium frame. The Dawes name now is used on some very low end imported bikes and you seem to have to pay a premium to get the Dawes name on it. Your £144 is better spent elsewhere in my opinion. The one good thing about this bike is it isn't fitted with terrible low end front suspension so its quite capable of being a good workhorse but its just the value isn't there.

Something like this is probably better.


halfords.com/cyc…-26


It's £50 less and will be assembled by Halfords for free and you also get a 6 week service thrown in. The simplified drive train without front derailleur and triple chainset while making hills more difficult will likely work better due to the simplicity of the chain line with such low end components. Yes the steel frame might be marginally heavier but could well offer a more comfortable ride, certainly unlikely to be worse.
bonzobanana44 m ago

I'm not sure when the threadless headset came in but it might have been …I'm not sure when the threadless headset came in but it might have been the early 90s. Whatever using such a bike off road risks the handlebars turning without the front wheel doing so or the stem raising or falling as you ride. This isn't a mountain bike its mountain bike style. Clearly a very budget bike with the only upgrade being from a steel to aluminium frame. The Dawes name now is used on some very low end imported bikes and you seem to have to pay a premium to get the Dawes name on it. Your £144 is better spent elsewhere in my opinion. The one good thing about this bike is it isn't fitted with terrible low end front suspension so its quite capable of being a good workhorse but its just the value isn't there.Something like this is probably better.http://www.halfords.com/cycling/bikes/mountain-bikes/ridge-mens-mountain-bike-26It's £50 less and will be assembled by Halfords for free and you also get a 6 week service thrown in. The simplified drive train without front derailleur and triple chainset while making hills more difficult will likely work better due to the simplicity of the chain line with such low end components. Yes the steel frame might be marginally heavier but could well offer a more comfortable ride, certainly unlikely to be worse.


I never claimed that this bike was particularly good, although to be honest it is as 'real' a mountain bike as any entry level mountain bike used for trail use in the late 80s and early 90s, and very much a throwback to that time.

I do recall threadless headsets becoming increasingly popular around 1991/2.

As for steel frames, cromoly on rigid mountain bikes was also used for higher strength with a reliance on rigid forks which this suffers being aluminium.

Dawes certainly have had a potted history in the mountain bike sector randomly changing throughout the 2000s between budget and mid-range specced bikes and then at their highest end just entry level ones, but more recently seem to have gone the way that other British bike assemblers/designers such as Muddy Fox and Saracen have done and having catalogue shop fodder OEM frames and low end components. I think 2011 was the last time I have seen a decent specced one in the Dawes Edge SE


evanscycles.com/daw…202
cicobuff39 m ago

I never claimed that this bike was particularly good, although to be …I never claimed that this bike was particularly good, although to be honest it is as 'real' a mountain bike as any entry level mountain bike used for trail use in the late 80s and early 90s, and very much a throwback to that time.I do recall threadless headsets becoming increasingly popular around 1991/2.As for steel frames, cromoly on rigid mountain bikes was also used for higher strength with a reliance on rigid forks which this suffers being aluminium.Dawes certainly have had a potted history in the mountain bike sector randomly changing throughout the 2000s between budget and mid-range specced bikes and then at their highest end just entry level ones, but more recently seem to have gone the way that other British bike assemblers/designers such as Muddy Fox and Saracen have done and having catalogue shop fodder OEM frames and low end components. I think 2011 was the last time I have seen a decent specced one in the Dawes Edge SEhttps://www.evanscycles.com/dawes-edge-se-2011-mountain-bike-EV144202


I don't think it is as strong because of its low end components as those early mountain bikes. Freewheels used to be the norm so before cassettes and freehubs you used to get a range of quality for freewheels and rear wheel axles would be better quality but now freewheels is a budget option only with weaker metals and inferior construction. Decent bikes have moved to freehubs and cassettes. Same with quill stems, the past they were decent but now its low end only. If you put a decent 80s/90s mountain bike against this one off road the older model would likely win. Lack of suspension meant the frames and forks were overly strong to cope with drops etc. Decent chromoly frames and forks that took some abuse.

This bike using the 20% off code (ends today I think) is £80 delivered.


sportsdirect.com/mud…526


Another option if you want a cheap new bike with 21 gears.


Plus similar bikes may be available in the Toys R Us store for even less, if you have one nearby that is closing.
LadyEleanor15 h, 43 m ago

6 speed normally means low end non standard frame and equipment.Am …6 speed normally means low end non standard frame and equipment.Am surprised it has a Dawes label.


Did the £144 price tag not give it away?
Another BSO at tesco for £89
Hmmm - sad what has happened to the Dawes brand name but I fear this is a £100 bike with a £44 name slapped onto it. I'd advise against. If you can stretch you budget to £200 you can find something MUCH better, though the 'sweet spot' in bikes (ie best value) is probably around £300. As you go above that the law of diminishing returns really kicks in and you need to be sure you really want to spend that much more for limited extra specification. Of course the expensive stuff is superior but people looking at this bike would probably be wasting their money at the upper end of enthusiast stuff.


"By the mid-1970s, the company was still family owned and producing 1000 bicycles a week. Between 1978 and 2001 the company was sold at least five times, passing through the hands of various venture capital and leisure companies. Resultantly, by the mid-1980s, the firm had 50 staff at its dilapidated Tysley factory. After being bought by ATAG of the Netherlands in 1990, the factory was closed down and production moved to Asia, while the head office moved to Castle Bromwich. In this guise it was bought by Midlands-based investment house Grove Industries in 1998 and sold to Tandem Group Plc in 2001." Wikipedia
Edited by: "Besford" 26th Mar
Robot71417 h, 1 m ago

Another BSO at tesco for £89


Bikes like that I don't consider BSO's they are strong and last years. Yes the gears are higher maintenance but they are a solid introduction. I consider BSO's to be those awful dual suspension bikes at entry level prices where the suspension doesn't work correctly and is very short life. What they aren't though is mountain bikes they are only suitable for roads, light trails etc.

Just been reading a thread on bikeradar where someone bought a Canyon carbon frame bike which had its frame crack on the first ride where as something like that Tesco bike could still be strong and working well 50 years from now as are many steel framed bikes around the world today of that vintage. A few choice upgrades would massively improve the bike anyway. Put some decent ball-bearings and marine grease in the wheel hubs and bottom bracket and a solid chromoly axle through the rear wheel and its a big upgrade.
This isn't really a bike for upgrading or trail riding etc. This is simply a cheap entry level bike for people who haven't ridden since they were a kid and are maybe thinking about commuting or getting a bit of excersise without breaking the bank as the lighter nights make it a practical option.
Besford19 h, 0 m ago

Hmmm - sad what has happened to the Dawes brand name but I fear this is a …Hmmm - sad what has happened to the Dawes brand name but I fear this is a £100 bike with a £44 name slapped onto it. I'd advise against. If you can stretch you budget to £200 you can find something MUCH better, though the 'sweet spot' in bikes (ie best value) is probably around £300. As you go above that the law of diminishing returns really kicks in and you need to be sure you really want to spend that much more for limited extra specification. Of course the expensive stuff is superior but people looking at this bike would probably be wasting their money at the upper end of enthusiast stuff."By the mid-1970s, the company was still family owned and producing 1000 bicycles a week. Between 1978 and 2001 the company was sold at least five times, passing through the hands of various venture capital and leisure companies. Resultantly, by the mid-1980s, the firm had 50 staff at its dilapidated Tysley factory. After being bought by ATAG of the Netherlands in 1990, the factory was closed down and production moved to Asia, while the head office moved to Castle Bromwich. In this guise it was bought by Midlands-based investment house Grove Industries in 1998 and sold to Tandem Group Plc in 2001." Wikipedia


Yes Dawes were once brilliant. The Galaxy tourer and Kingpin folding bike were standout models. I have an old Kingpin model but that is the only Dawes bike I have ever owned. The current kingpin model has a £500 suggested retail price and yet appears to be the same budget components you find on a £130 bike using a similar generic Chinese frame except they have gone for the aluminium version. The sad thing is the original Kingpin is in many ways superior, being all weather (3 speed hub), better ride quality and better handling and a similar weight. It's only really the V brakes that are superior and rider fit thanks to handlebar height adjustment.

Dawes seem to have dropped an even lower level now than a couple of years ago, very much budget end products even if the prices are higher. Even most of the Galaxy tourer models are using aluminium frames when they were famous for being comfortable strong steel tourers. You have to go to the Super Galaxy and Ultra Galaxy to get proper steel frames which are a £1000 or more. Also they were a supplier to Toys R Us and there has been a large decline in the number of local bike shops that would mean less outlets. It just looks like a company struggling to innovate and create standout models.

33522238-kKlQx.jpg
Besford26th Mar

Hmmm - sad what has happened to the Dawes brand name but I fear this is a …Hmmm - sad what has happened to the Dawes brand name but I fear this is a £100 bike with a £44 name slapped onto it. I'd advise against. If you can stretch you budget to £200 you can find something MUCH better, though the 'sweet spot' in bikes (ie best value) is probably around £300. As you go above that the law of diminishing returns really kicks in and you need to be sure you really want to spend that much more for limited extra specification. Of course the expensive stuff is superior but people looking at this bike would probably be wasting their money at the upper end of enthusiast stuff."By the mid-1970s, the company was still family owned and producing 1000 bicycles a week. Between 1978 and 2001 the company was sold at least five times, passing through the hands of various venture capital and leisure companies. Resultantly, by the mid-1980s, the firm had 50 staff at its dilapidated Tysley factory. After being bought by ATAG of the Netherlands in 1990, the factory was closed down and production moved to Asia, while the head office moved to Castle Bromwich. In this guise it was bought by Midlands-based investment house Grove Industries in 1998 and sold to Tandem Group Plc in 2001." Wikipedia


I'm after a mens hybrid bike or light MTB at around the £300 mark thorugh Cycle 2 Work scheme. You sound like you know your stuff, so what bikes would you recommend? Cheers.
KingCampo3 h, 54 m ago

I'm after a mens hybrid bike or light MTB at around the £300 mark thorugh …I'm after a mens hybrid bike or light MTB at around the £300 mark thorugh Cycle 2 Work scheme. You sound like you know your stuff, so what bikes would you recommend? Cheers.


Hi. Thanks for the compliment but I wouldn't put myself forward as an expert; I've just bought and sold a number of bikes (mostly used ones) since returning to cycling when I retired and enjoy working on them so I've picked up a bit of knowledge along the way.

Your budget is a good one for a decent bike which doesn't get into 'silly money' territory.

I suggest the key factor is what you want to use it for. All on-road or some (light) off road (eg towpaths)? Leisure and/or commuting? Distances? If you wanted a true 'mountain bike' worthy of the name you'd have to spend MUCH more, but I don't think that's what your suggesting. At your budget keep it simple: probably no suspension for example as it won't be necessary or any good, it just adds weight, absorbs energy and won't work well or for long!

It sounds like some sort of hybrid is likely to suit but hybrid is a pretty broad term which really covers what's left after you've taken out all the specialist stuff (mountain, road, etc.) and runs from 'near mountain bike' to 'flat bar road bike'.

Anyway, depending on your use there's plenty out there. Like so much stuff these days RRP should be a start point only and you should be able to get much more for your money on one of the many deals in a competitive market (though much of the 2017 stuff has probably gone by now?).

Finally: size/fit is critical. The best bike in the world will be horrible to ride if it's the wrong fit whereas you can get away with a mediocre bike that fits nicely. This probably leads you to a bike shop rather than mail order if you're not sure.

People are very dismissive of Halfords, which may be justified sometimes, but I think you could do a lot worse than going to browse their ranges. Clearly a specialist bike shop is likely to be more consistent but your budget probably doesn't work well there.

Go and have a look at the Carrera stuff in Halfords: generally decent bikes (if properly assembled and set up by the shop) and your budget is at the centre of their range (though unfortunately most have suspension). Don't buy without a big discount from RRP though (they play games with pricing and each model seems to be discounted at some time)! Boardman would be even better but probably beyond what you want to spend (though see below). Avoid Apollo at all costs!

If you can stretch your budget a bit what about this:
halfords.com/cyc…mes


I'm sure plenty of other HUKD members will have ideastoo.
Edited by: "Besford" 28th Mar
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