Decathlon Triban 500 SE Road Bike £249
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Decathlon Triban 500 SE Road Bike £249

58
Found 24th Apr
Summer is upon us and Decathlon are offering this bike at a great price. If it's a road bike that you're after you can't go wrong with this bike.
Lifetime guarantee on frame, handlebar and stem, fork and parts 2 years.

9/10 rating given by Cycling Weekly.
cyclingweekly.com/rev…0se
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RRP £299

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husna200051 m ago

I wish I knew how to ride a bike


I learned at 35.
Was always embarrassed so didn't try.

It took me 20 minutes until I was pedalling.

Find a quiet area will a tiny slope and practice rolling down and balancing. Push it back up and keep trying. It'll come really quick (that's what she said!). Then gradually try pedalling once you can balance. It's also easier on a slightly smaller bike.
Edited by: "Toffee82" 24th Apr
58 Comments
Only 63cm frame left online.
Great price though
brand new bike for used beater money.
fallout5115 m ago

Only 63cm frame left online. Great price though



If they'd had a 53 I'd have one for a winter beater.
Edited by: "cirian1975" 24th Apr
fantastic bike. Bought one a few years ago for £300 and can't recommend highly enough..
carling832 m ago

fantastic bike. Bought one a few years ago for £300 and can't recommend …fantastic bike. Bought one a few years ago for £300 and can't recommend highly enough..


Same here, purchased when they first came out so managed to get one with the sora chainrings. Think I paid about £380 but its been used for the last four years as my commuter bike (both summer and winter) with hardly any problems.
Im unsure on the sizing. i'm 6ft 2, will this bike be too big for me?

Cheers
Decathlons are or were small fitting so 63 is perfect for 6' and up.
Edited by: "LadyEleanor" 24th Apr
LadyEleanor20 m ago

Decathlons are or were small fitting so 63 is perfect for 6' and up.


With them running small would it be too small for someone 6' 4"?
A flat bar version would be great.
Amazing value for money
mdentz31 m ago

With them running small would it be too small for someone 6' 4"?


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nice bike without pedals?
kirk284 m ago

nice bike without pedals?



That's usually the rider's choice, do you want to clip in, flat pedal, road or MTB pedals etc
kirk288 m ago

nice bike without pedals?



Technical Information says " Pedals Platform pedals with toe clips." So I presume they supply a basic set of pedals with the bike.
I also bought this bike at this price over Xmas was £300 then £250 so its come back around , great 1st road bike it’s quick and light for the price , only needed to fit the pedals , seat and handle bars . You also get included rear front light and a bell (the front light is pants) only issue is the deraileer catches the chain on the higher gears dispite many slight adjustments .
Great bike for the money. Matches or beats most £500 road bikes.
Got this bike myself. Never had any problems, it's great!
awesome price paid 300 for it couple of years back
I've got a triathlon coming up (sprint distance) and wondering if it would be a better option to buy this, rather than doing it on my hybrid bike as I'd planned to do. Not sure how much of a difference it'll make in terms of speed/time.
Edited by: "mdentz" 24th Apr
look to have all gone online, but still avaliable for store collection
Shame there appears to be no available 57 stock
I wish I knew how to ride a bike
husna200051 m ago

I wish I knew how to ride a bike


I learned at 35.
Was always embarrassed so didn't try.

It took me 20 minutes until I was pedalling.

Find a quiet area will a tiny slope and practice rolling down and balancing. Push it back up and keep trying. It'll come really quick (that's what she said!). Then gradually try pedalling once you can balance. It's also easier on a slightly smaller bike.
Edited by: "Toffee82" 24th Apr
Toffee8228 m ago

I learned at 35.Was always embarrassed so didn't try.It took me 20 minutes …I learned at 35.Was always embarrassed so didn't try.It took me 20 minutes until I was pedalling.Find a quiet area will a tiny slope and practice rolling down and balancing. Push it back up and keep trying. It'll come really quick (that's what she said!). Then gradually try pedalling once you can balance. It's also easier on a slightly smaller bike.


Thanks for the advice
I had originally considered the 500SE, however noticed the clearance to support larger tyres etc wasn't as good as the 500.

Ended up with the 500 and it's been amazing, mainly due to the customer service from Decathlon them selves. I took the bike in to be repaired after I had come off in the rain and because the frame has a lifetime warranty, they replaced the whole bike when they couldn't remove the bottom bracket.

Took it in again a few weeks ago for some maintenance and they only charged me £9.99 to remove, check and refit my bottom bracket, true my rear wheel and give it a once over.
Has been this price for a little while (at least a month), as part of their clearance. I know cos I have been double checking if an 57 size ones come back in, but no, it's the 63 only still.

I actually had one of these when they first came out a few years ago, but because of moving to a small place with no room to keep it I hardly got to use it so sold it. It's a terrific piece of work, SO light, and I was flying around the street's when I did get to use it.

I am 5'11 and I think that I had the 57 before (would double check though if it did become available), the 63 I think is for at least 6"1'+ people. (I have relatively shorter legs than avg I think).
Good thing with decathlon is you can have a good ride around the store on any of their bikes to check size and feel, etc.
Edited by: "DonkeyKonk" 24th Apr
I bought this same bike in a 63cm a while ago but ended up returning as it was too small. I'm 6'5" with 35" leg. With the seat post extended a few cm beyond the max marker it was still too small. Decathlon offered a convertor so I could buy a longer seat post but I returned it and bought this Cannondale which has been much better for me:
rutlandcycling.com/bik…873
husna20002 h, 52 m ago

I wish I knew how to ride a bike


I never had a bike til I was in my late 40s. Never learned as a teenager and had to learn aged about 48 when my brother suggested I get a bike - for exercise if nothing else. Just find a quiet spot , if possible a sympathetic experienced biker and spend a few minutes each day balancing and freewheeling. Eventually you get the pedals going, look ahead not at your legs/feet and just practice - little but often.
Still not a super confident rider in heavy traffic so I avoid, but can get around eg to work, if I avoid the main roads and roundabouts. Wish I'd got a bike years ago specially as I don't drive.
Decathlon sell decent cheap bikes, I got a Rockrider for £150 back then, soon after I started , which I still use.
Posted months ago when the had all frame sizes in stock.

Only one frame size size now in stock and you need to be 6’3” to ride it.

Cold - until sensible sizes come back in stock
danieltruman3 h, 12 m ago

Shame there appears to be no available 57 stock


Never was.

Been OOS in every size bar 63cm for month now. So, don’t feel like you’ve just missed ou
mdentz6 h, 4 m ago

I've got a triathlon coming up (sprint distance) and wondering if it would …I've got a triathlon coming up (sprint distance) and wondering if it would be a better option to buy this, rather than doing it on my hybrid bike as I'd planned to do. Not sure how much of a difference it'll make in terms of speed/time.


Impossible to say without more information but if your hybrid's decent (ie lightweight) and has suitable geometry (ie that allows you to get down into a comfortable aero position) then you might fare better attaching some aerobars to that, and looking at better (ie lighter) wheels and (ie lighter and faster rolling) tyres...
Edited by: "Garnett" 24th Apr
mdentz6 h, 5 m ago

I've got a triathlon coming up (sprint distance) and wondering if it would …I've got a triathlon coming up (sprint distance) and wondering if it would be a better option to buy this, rather than doing it on my hybrid bike as I'd planned to do. Not sure how much of a difference it'll make in terms of speed/time.


What sort of hybrid is it you have? The term is very general as it can describe a bike that's pretty much a mountain bike with an upright frame, bigger tyres and front suspension to the other end of the scale where they're pretty much road bikes with flat bars (instead of drop bars) with a rigid frame and narrow tyres.

Even at the road bike end of the hybrids, the road bikes have the advantage of usually a more aggressive riding position making it easier particularly when pushing into a head wind and the drop bars also have the advantage of giving you a few different positions to put your hands which I find makes longer rides more comfortable..

That said over a short distance I don't think you'd see much difference over a hybrid bike unless it's a bit of a tank, if it has quite knobbly tyres then it's certainly worth considering getting some slicker tyres that can be run at high pressure as that can make a big difference.
It's a great price, but it's been this price for 18 months.
Toffee825 h, 50 m ago

I learned at 35.Was always embarrassed so didn't try.It took me 20 minutes …I learned at 35.Was always embarrassed so didn't try.It took me 20 minutes until I was pedalling.Find a quiet area will a tiny slope and practice rolling down and balancing. Push it back up and keep trying. It'll come really quick (that's what she said!). Then gradually try pedalling once you can balance. It's also easier on a slightly smaller bike.


To add to this don't feel down if it takes you longer - just keep at it. Took me 3 hours (took the others I was with around the same time) at age 22 and now I cycle everywhere.
Garnett1 h, 26 m ago

Impossible to say without more information but if your hybrid's decent (ie …Impossible to say without more information but if your hybrid's decent (ie lightweight) and has suitable geometry (ie that allows you to get down into a comfortable aero position) then you might fare better attaching some aerobars to that, and looking at better (ie lighter) wheels and (ie lighter and faster rolling) tyres...


Johnmcl71 h, 22 m ago

What sort of hybrid is it you have? The term is very general as it can …What sort of hybrid is it you have? The term is very general as it can describe a bike that's pretty much a mountain bike with an upright frame, bigger tyres and front suspension to the other end of the scale where they're pretty much road bikes with flat bars (instead of drop bars) with a rigid frame and narrow tyres. Even at the road bike end of the hybrids, the road bikes have the advantage of usually a more aggressive riding position making it easier particularly when pushing into a head wind and the drop bars also have the advantage of giving you a few different positions to put your hands which I find makes longer rides more comfortable..That said over a short distance I don't think you'd see much difference over a hybrid bike unless it's a bit of a tank, if it has quite knobbly tyres then it's certainly worth considering getting some slicker tyres that can be run at high pressure as that can make a big difference.


Thanks for the replies, the hybrid I’ve got is a second hand Giant Escape 2 2017. It has 32mm tyres, which I was thinking of changing to 25mm before the triathlon.

The ride itself is ‘only’ 18.9k, so I guess it’s best to get this one out of the way, and if I enjoy it I can look into spending money on a road bike. It’s so difficult not wanting to get the best time you can after all the research, training and preparation.

I was also thinking about some clipless pedalsand tri specific shoes, but that would come in around £160-£200, and it’s not worth it if I don’t stick with it.
Edited by: "mdentz" 24th Apr
Fantastic bike for the money but I'm wondering if Decathlon are not replacing it in the range. The Triban 100 is best avoided with junk components at £249 and no signs of a new £299 bike with decent components to replace the 500SE. Hopefully we will see the slightly better 500 model discounted to £299 occasionally.

Don't forget sometimes zeek has discounted decathlon giftcards available and you can earn topcashback on buying zeek gift cards too. Can help knock down the price a bit.
kirk289 h, 1 m ago

nice bike without pedals?


All bikes have to ship with pedals. It's common practice not to install them so you can chose your own. Never once have inrifdem the supplied pedals
Decent price for a decent road bike
mdentz2 h, 49 m ago

Thanks for the replies, the hybrid I’ve got is a second hand Giant Escape 2 …Thanks for the replies, the hybrid I’ve got is a second hand Giant Escape 2 2017. It has 32mm tyres, which I was thinking of changing to 25mm before the triathlon.The ride itself is ‘only’ 18.9k, so I guess it’s best to get this one out of the way, and if I enjoy it I can look into spending money on a road bike. It’s so difficult not wanting to get the best time you can after all the research, training and preparation.I was also thinking about some clipless pedalsand tri specific shoes, but that would come in around £160-£200, and it’s not worth it if I don’t stick with it.


That looks a reasonable hybrid and over such a short distance I don't think you'd see a huge improvement with a road bike unless you're planning doing longer rides.

If the tyres are mostly slicks then I don't think you'll see a huge difference going down from 32mm to 25mm as I've just done the opposite and don't notice any loss of speed.

I think clipless pedals are overrated, for those that like the feel of them then people can be faster but the performance benefits are usually hugely exaggerated, I spent a while trying different clipless pedal systems but never liked the feel of them and back to flats. Either way you don't need clipless pedals to do a decent distance or speed.

John
Toffee829 h, 31 m ago

I learned at 35.Was always embarrassed so didn't try.It took me 20 minutes …I learned at 35.Was always embarrassed so didn't try.It took me 20 minutes until I was pedalling.Find a quiet area will a tiny slope and practice rolling down and balancing. Push it back up and keep trying. It'll come really quick (that's what she said!). Then gradually try pedalling once you can balance. It's also easier on a slightly smaller bike.



Fair play to you! Never too late and really admire the attitude
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