Dehumidifier, clothing drying function, 3 years warranty £129.99 @ ALDI
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Dehumidifier, clothing drying function, 3 years warranty £129.99 @ ALDI

£129.99ALDI Deals
200
Found 4th Oct 2014
Not sure how good this is or how it compares to others, but I like buying from Aldi because of their excellent return policy (45 days hassle free returns) and the 3 years warranty.

Prevents many kinds of fungi and keeps rooms free from mildew and damp, so they stay dry, cosy and easy to keep clean.

6 function settings
Air dehumidifying performance max. 20 litres in 24 hours
Continuous use possible
Automatic switch-off function if the water tank is full
Timer function
Water tank capacity approx. 5.5 litres
38.5 x 29 x 59.5cm

200 Comments

Not an amazing price tbh.

anyone used this one? I've got a 10L that could do with replacing ahead of winter

Original Poster

Nad_84

Not an amazing price tbh.anyone used this one? I've got a 10L that could … Not an amazing price tbh.anyone used this one? I've got a 10L that could do with replacing ahead of winter


How much did you pay for the 10L one? This is double the capacity. I assume is a classic system, not a desiccant one (which is a good thing, as desiccant ones produce some odours)
Edited by: "MaximusRo" 25th Oct 2014

mod

Thanks for posting. I’ve added the price to the title.
Here’s a ‘Help’ link which gives tips and advice on thread posting.

Are these not for damp homes! Those who really need them probably can't afford this price.
Please correct me if I'm wrong.

I bought a meaco one from john lewis. Last yr I payed £99 this yr it's £129. 5yr guarantee. It has a dry function for washing. It works great. Kept my home mould free all winter ( I had environmentle health out as not one wall in the house was free from mould so really bad )

Says 2 yr guarantee now on john lewis. Mine had a 5 yr guarantee.

Original Poster

chrsinne

Are these not for damp homes! Those who really need them probably can't … Are these not for damp homes! Those who really need them probably can't afford this price.Please correct me if I'm wrong.


You should buy a cheap (around £5) humidity sensor and see if your house needs it.
Anything over 60% relative humidity is not healthy. Is not up to the house, but to the weather outside.

If you have damp you need to find the cause & remedy it, not run these all the time.

guttering, checks for cracks in outer skin of building, wet walls helped out by some brick waterproofer NOW.

move as much furniture et al away from outer walls (reorganise living space), crack windows to let steam out etc.

ventilate.

Original Poster

MR GUS

If you have damp you need to find the cause & remedy it, not run these … If you have damp you need to find the cause & remedy it, not run these all the time.guttering, checks for cracks in outer skin of building, wet walls helped out by some brick waterproofer NOW.move as much furniture et al away from outer walls (reorganise living space), crack windows to let steam out etc.ventilate.


Only if you want to be re-active and not pro-active. You advise people to wait until they actually take notice visually of the damp.
I am advising anyone to buy a cheap humidity sensor and check, anything about 60% is an issue, but I would say you have to aim for 50%-55%. If you have or had 60% for a few days, even if you do not notice it now, some damp has developed somewhere and will be there until you find it.

I would say if you buy a dehumidifier you definitely can afford a humidity sensor as well. And can also measure how well the dehumidifier is doing it's job, although the water in the tank will be quite visual too... I wonder what is the humidity reading in your house right now.
Edited by: "MaximusRo" 4th Oct 2014

MaximusRo

You should buy a cheap (around £5) humidity sensor and see if your house … You should buy a cheap (around £5) humidity sensor and see if your house needs it. Anything over 60% relative humidity is not healthy. Is not up to the house, but to the weather outside.



I had a quick look for 'humidity sensor' but I seem to get machine parts or the All in one Weather station type things. What else can I search for term wise?

MaximusRo

How much did you pay for the 10L one? This is double the capacity. I … How much did you pay for the 10L one? This is double the capacity. I assume is a classic system, not a desiccant one (which is a good things, as desiccant ones produce some odours)



I paid 89 I think for a 10L with a 2L tank.
I was kind of hoping for the usual jaw dropping aldi prices I guess.

Good for drying clothes indoors in the winter when you're unlikely to have your windows open.

Original Poster

Meathotukdeals

I had a quick look for 'humidity sensor' but I seem to get machine parts … I had a quick look for 'humidity sensor' but I seem to get machine parts or the All in one Weather station type things. What else can I search for term wise?


Sorry, should have said humidity meter (or hygrometer).
Here's a list on Amazon, starting from £3

Edited by: "MaximusRo" 5th Oct 2014

MaximusRo

Sorry, should have said humidity meter (or hygrometer).Here's a list on … Sorry, should have said humidity meter (or hygrometer).Here's a list on Amazon, starting from £3



Ah OK now I see. Reminds me of a a couple of things I got a while back for the greenhouse though. I could tests the temp accuracy of them with a good ref thermometer and it was not that accurate so I'd be very iffy about a reading for humidity. I remeber the old way of reading it with wet bulb and dry bulb thermometer and chart (can't help but feel wind speed should be in there also). If they can't get temp accurate then I doubt they can get something more complex right.

MaximusRo

Sorry, should have said humidity meter (or hygrometer).Here's a list on … Sorry, should have said humidity meter (or hygrometer).Here's a list on Amazon, starting from £3



I will loook into it anyway - see if anyone has tested accuracy of the humidity reading. Cheers.

MaximusRo

Only if you want to be re-active and not pro-active. You advise people to … Only if you want to be re-active and not pro-active. You advise people to wait until they actually take notice visually of the damp.I am advising anyone to buy a cheap humidity sensor and check, anything about 60% is an issue, but I would say you have to aim for 50%-55%. If you have or had 60% for a few days, even if you do not notice it now, some damp has developed somewhere and will be there until you find it.I would say if you buy a dehumidifier you definitely can afford a humidity sensor as well. And can also measure how well the dehumidifier is doing it's job, although the water in the tank will be quite visual too... I wonder what is the humidity reading in your house right now.



I have temp & humidity digital hygrometer readings in every room of the house, including the stair / landing area what would you like!? ...also use a woodburner with well seasoned wood, good dry heat. (don't forget a decent one for the logs, including a temp & moisture reading for the freshly split logs (species selector within that too).

My point is that some "thicky twins" within this sceptred isle, will buy this, stick it on yet not change their approach to lifestyle which more often than not contributes to the overall problem.

Daytime is rapidly disappearing, winterising needs to be approached now before frost & nasty weather set in for the common contributors that often ramp up the damp, mould, etc.

Folks, running a decent hepa filtration unit will also assist if you have it (spores), ..every little bit helps if you have a dodgey cold room, look at additional insulation too & take time to seal up air gaps ( & mouse access) around your wet rad pipes, with a bit of silicone.

One big source of condensate migration as mentioned in another thread (screwfix halogen fittings) is wet air movement from kitchens (cooking without adequate ventilation) which rises & go's through your light fittings & the like moving upward into the next floor (unless you live in a bungalow of course).

& don't renovate a bathroom & put more darn plasterboard back in, just asking for trouble, ..air that sucker well / consider a single room heat recovery & ventilation unit (but don't take the recovery %'s as written in stone) .. take a look here to get your heads around the basics. navitron.org.uk/for…tml
vent-axia.com/hrv…ery
airflow.com/pro…ans

Might get this for drying out a house that we are about to buy that has a lot of damp

Thoughts?????

ian18

Might get this for drying out a house that we are about to buy that has a … Might get this for drying out a house that we are about to buy that has a lot of dampThoughts?????



I am looking at this one- quiet enough to have on overnight on those really freezing nights. Won't run all the time just when needed and gives off heat which is nice. Plus it "is" quicker to heat a dryer room so heating bills should drop.

amazon.co.uk/dp/…c=1

Original Poster

chapchap

I am looking at this one- quiet enough to have on overnight on those … I am looking at this one- quiet enough to have on overnight on those really freezing nights. Won't run all the time just when needed and gives off heat which is nice. Plus it "is" quicker to heat a dryer room so heating bills should drop.http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00474K8SY/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=1CEVPBK07DLJ4&coliid=I20ZY5SD3K0TWC&psc=1


That is desiccant type, some people don't like the smell they give out (from the chemical reaction).

Original Poster

Meathotukdeals

Ah OK now I see. Reminds me of a a couple of things I got a while back … Ah OK now I see. Reminds me of a a couple of things I got a while back for the greenhouse though. I could tests the temp accuracy of them with a good ref thermometer and it was not that accurate so I'd be very iffy about a reading for humidity. I remeber the old way of reading it with wet bulb and dry bulb thermometer and chart (can't help but feel wind speed should be in there also). If they can't get temp accurate then I doubt they can get something more complex right.


You might over complicate it a bit, if you buy a £3 meter, you cannot go wrong really.
After that you can buy a more expensive one.
Either one of them will give you a good understanding of the humidity in your house, even if it is not accurate (against what?) it will show the trend.

Anyway, seems that this dehumidifier has a hygrometer itself... it displays the humidity on a LED display and starts working automatically if needed and then stops by itself... not bad at all!
Edited by: "MaximusRo" 6th Oct 2014

chapchap

I am looking at this one- quiet enough to have on overnight on those … I am looking at this one- quiet enough to have on overnight on those really freezing nights. Won't run all the time just when needed and gives off heat which is nice. Plus it "is" quicker to heat a dryer room so heating bills should drop.http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00474K8SY/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=1CEVPBK07DLJ4&coliid=I20ZY5SD3K0TWC&psc=1



Am having loads of carp with my net connection and can't get the item page to load but be aware that the dehumidifiers that work by cooling air can have a minimum working environmental temp.

Original Poster

Meathotukdeals

Am having loads of carp with my net connection and can't get the item … Am having loads of carp with my net connection and can't get the item page to load but be aware that the dehumidifiers that work by cooling air can have a minimum working environmental temp.


Relax, it can work down to 5 Celsius. It is designed for enclosed spaces (obviously) so that's a non issue.
If it worked lower than 5, you would probably see the water in the tank freezing. I am sure that would be an issue for any type of dehumidifier.
Edited by: "MaximusRo" 6th Oct 2014

Original Poster

It shows exactly the same reading as my hygrometer:
http://i57.tinypic.com/jl743t.jpg
Edited by: "MaximusRo" 6th Oct 2014

Original Poster

http://i61.tinypic.com/333cqvt.jpg

MaximusRo

Relax, it can work down to 5 Celsius. It is designed for enclosed spaces … Relax, it can work down to 5 Celsius. It is designed for enclosed spaces (obviously) so that's a non issue.If it worked lower than 5, you would probably see the water in the tank freezing. I am sure that would be an issue for any type of dehumidifier.



Was just that a few years ago I looked into getting one for a small unheated room we had and the ones that fitted the bill size and price wise ended up being unsuitable due to their min temp needs. I can't remeber what that was (maybe around 18 degrees C) but was not warmer than the room, so ended up getting no where. 5 degrees C sounds fine though.

Original Poster

Meathotukdeals

Was just that a few years ago I looked into getting one for a small … Was just that a few years ago I looked into getting one for a small unheated room we had and the ones that fitted the bill size and price wise ended up being unsuitable due to their min temp needs. I can't remeber what that was (maybe around 18 degrees C) but was not warmer than the room, so ended up getting no where. 5 degrees C sounds fine though.


18 minimum operating temp seems weird.

I used the dehumidifier yesterday, in just 2 hours got the humidity from 64 to 57%... incredible... It is rather big so I suspect it is very effective for the medium sized rooms I got.

Can anyone confirm how many watts of energy this dehumidifer uses per hour?

whatsThePoint

says on the box



durrrrrr! How did i miss that

MaximusRo

That is desiccant type, some people don't like the smell they give out … That is desiccant type, some people don't like the smell they give out (from the chemical reaction).



They don't smell all the time though do they? Maybe at the beginning and then occasionally after that.

chapchap

They don't smell all the time though do they? Maybe at the beginning and … They don't smell all the time though do they? Maybe at the beginning and then occasionally after that.


Never, ever noticed any kind of smell with a desiccant dehumidifier. Far more efficient than the compressor type at lower temperatures, too. Had both, but wouldn't go back to compressors.

Newbold

Never, ever noticed any kind of smell with a desiccant dehumidifier. Far … Never, ever noticed any kind of smell with a desiccant dehumidifier. Far more efficient than the compressor type at lower temperatures, too. Had both, but wouldn't go back to compressors.



I am looking now for one....waiting as long as I can before buying...hoping to get a bargain! But it is getting colder and the windows won't be open for much longer I reckon.

Original Poster

Newbold

Never, ever noticed any kind of smell with a desiccant dehumidifier. Far … Never, ever noticed any kind of smell with a desiccant dehumidifier. Far more efficient than the compressor type at lower temperatures, too. Had both, but wouldn't go back to compressors.


I researched and seen countless reviews about smell and people saying the manufscturers explained it is normal as it is a chemical reaction.
I didn't had one myself though.

MaximusRo

I researched and seen countless reviews about smell and people saying the … I researched and seen countless reviews about smell and people saying the manufscturers explained it is normal as it is a chemical reaction. I didn't had one myself though.


I've seen the comments - though the general view seems to be that it's caused more by the retransmission of odours collected from the house than any chemical reaction per se.

If you don't have a house that smells of tobacco etc there probably won't be a problem. I've used one of these (an excellent Meaco) for some time now and there's never been one hint of a smell from it.

Original Poster

Newbold

I've seen the comments - though the general view seems to be that it's … I've seen the comments - though the general view seems to be that it's caused more by the retransmission of odours collected from the house than any chemical reaction per se.If you don't have a house that smells of tobacco etc there probably won't be a problem. I've used one of these (an excellent Meaco) for some time now and there's never been one hint of a smell from it.


You say general view, but I didn't see that opinion.
What model do you have? Would you buy a compressor one? I think the desiccant ones tend to warm up the air, which is handy in the winter

MaximusRo

You say general view, but I didn't see that opinion. What model do you … You say general view, but I didn't see that opinion. What model do you have? Would you buy a compressor one? I think the desiccant ones tend to warm up the air, which is handy in the winter


Meaco DD8L - one for us and one for a relative. Had the compressor sort before, but these work far more efficiently, and the heat they give out is a bonus. Would thoroughly recommend it if they still sell them (or similar). Well reviewed, as I recall.

These tend to use 2 units a day, the desiccant ones 8 units a day. (HEAT). But what is the minimum working temperature on this. Its the low quality refrigerants that only work at 10C+ . I want one to also use ina garage so I need 5C, but I do not not want the heater kind.

Original Poster

LadyEleanor

These tend to use 2 units a day, the desiccant ones 8 units a day. … These tend to use 2 units a day, the desiccant ones 8 units a day. (HEAT). But what is the minimum working temperature on this. Its the low quality refrigerants that only work at 10C+ . I want one to also use ina garage so I need 5C, but I do not not want the heater kind.


The manual states it works at a minimum temp of 5C

Original Poster

Newbold

Meaco DD8L - one for us and one for a relative. Had the compressor sort … Meaco DD8L - one for us and one for a relative. Had the compressor sort before, but these work far more efficiently, and the heat they give out is a bonus. Would thoroughly recommend it if they still sell them (or similar). Well reviewed, as I recall.


I would not be so sure about the efficiency of the dessicate type.
They eat twice as much energy (as you probably know, you cannot generate heat without eating a lot of electricity).
They are also less effective in removing moisture, so they will run double the time to do the same job. If you look at them, they only come with small water tanks, while compressor once come with huge tanks. This unit from Aldi works surprisingly well, it runs about 30 mins and then shuts itself off for about 4 or 5 hours, because in just 30 min it manages to take the moisture down a lot. It then completely automatically starts itself again for 30 min and so on. Maybe not even 30 min sometimes... it is incredibly good. I have to measure the time it is actually on, but like I said it is very effective. Looking at Meaco ratings, this would be one of the largest they advertise, suitable to be used for house with up to 6 rooms.

I looked at Meaco and I don't like them, they falsely advertise the power consumption (their "efficient" 355W is actually rated at 370W in the tech description), and they advertise their own "intelligent" logic, that turns the device on every 30 min for 5 minutes to measure the moisture??? I don't want it switching on and off next to me all day and night. I think Aldi is way more intelligent since it shows the moisture reading all the time and only starts when needed! Why would it need to start every 30 min to check when moisture meters are cheap and effective.

Your model, Meaco DD8L, is capable of a max 8l/day extraction, while the Aldi one is capable of 20l/day! Huge difference.

Anyway, even with Meaco power ratings, they still quote Power consumption 30/330/650 watts. No explanation why there are 3 different ratings. The Alsi one is max 380W. 650W is almost double for less then half extraction.

Edited by: "MaximusRo" 9th Oct 2014

MaximusRo

I would not be so sure about the efficiency of the dessicate type.They … I would not be so sure about the efficiency of the dessicate type.They eat twice as much energy (as you probably know, you cannot generate heat without eating a lot of electricity).They are also less effective in removing moisture, so they will run double the time to do the same job. If you look at them, they only come with small water tanks, while compressor once come with huge tanks. This unit from Aldi works surprisingly well, it runs about 30 mins and then shuts itself off for about 4 or 5 hours, because in just 30 min it manages to take the moisture down a lot. It then completely automatically starts itself again for 30 min and so on. Maybe not even 30 min sometimes... it is incredibly good. I have to measure the time it is actually on, but like I said it is very effective. Looking at Meaco ratings, this would be one of the largest they advertise, suitable to be used for house with up to 6 rooms.I looked at Meaco and I don't like them, they falsely advertise the power consumption (their "efficient" 355W is actually rated at 370W in the tech description), and they advertise their own "intelligent" logic, that turns the device on every 30 min for 5 minutes to measure the moisture??? I don't want it switching on and off next to me all day and night. I think Aldi is way more intelligent since it shows the moisture reading all the time and only starts when needed! Why would it need to start every 30 min to check when moisture meters are cheap and effective.Your model, Meaco DD8L, is capable of a max 8l/day extraction, while the Aldi one is capable of 20l/day! Huge difference.Anyway, even with Meaco power ratings, they still quote Power consumption 30/330/650 watts. No explanation why there are 3 different ratings. The Alsi one is max 380W. 650W is almost double for less then half extraction.



I think you misunderstand the capability of the Aldi machine. The 20 litre per day is a theoretical maximum which is almost impossible to achieve, and it's the way people get drawn into buying dehumidifiers by misleading advertising.

The 20 litres, as you'll see above, depends on there being a humidity of at least 80% and a temperature of at least 30 degrees Celsius. That will not remotely happen, or anywhere near happen, over a 24 hour period.

The Meaco operates at 3 levels - you choose which. I've tried compressor and desiccant, and I find the latter much more effective (and much quieter). The heat produced isn't wasted either, as they're mainly used in winter.

Personal choice, though - depends what you're looking for.

Original Poster

Newbold

I think you misunderstand the capability of the Aldi machine. The 20 … I think you misunderstand the capability of the Aldi machine. The 20 litre per day is a theoretical maximum which is almost impossible to achieve, and it's the way people get drawn into buying dehumidifiers by misleading advertising.The 20 litres, as you'll see above, depends on there being a humidity of at least 80% and a temperature of at least 30 degrees Celsius. That will not remotely happen, or anywhere near happen, over a 24 hour period.The Meaco operates at 3 levels - you choose which. I've tried compressor and desiccant, and I find the latter much more effective (and much quieter). The heat produced isn't wasted either, as they're mainly used in winter.Personal choice, though - depends what you're looking for.


The Meaco 8l/day figure is measured in certain conditions as well. So what did I misunderstood? These are the facts, desiccant are not as effective (limitation of the technology, You can also easily see that large capacity dehumidifiers are all compressor type), they eat more energy (almost double) and need to run more to give the same results. I also posted the numbers, if you disagree with them, please post back your findings.

I didn't say the heat is wasted, did I ?

I also dislike Meaco specifically because of that "intelligent" silly way of functioning.
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